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College Now

Summer 2016 Application



The 2016 Summer Liberal Arts Institute is open to Sphomores & Juniors in any NYC Public High Schools with the following qualifications:

  • PSAT/SAT Verbal Section (Min. 480) OR English Lanagauge Arts Regents (Min. 75), OR ACT (Min. 20).
  • PSAT/SAT Math Section (Min. 480) OR Mathematics Regents (Min. 75).
  • Students who use PSAT scores to qualify for admission to the program, must have an overall GPA of 85.

Online Application for the Summer 2016 application deadline has passed.

Students will be notified by May 1st the latest as to whether or not they have been accepted into the program.

  • Note: Incomplete applications will not be processed. Prospective participants MUST email, fax or mail Transcript and/or PSAT/SAT scores.
Course Descriptions

These are descriptions of the courses which are being offered for the 2016 Summer semester.

 
BUS 1000: Introduction to Business (Entrepreneurship Focus), 3 credits
Students are given an overview of the study of business early in their college studies so that they can decide which field to major in and how the world of business works. The class is broken in four distinct parts - finance, marketing, management and an introductory section that covers ethics, global business and economics. Each of these parts covers the basic concepts found in one of the areas a student might select as a major. Each section also covers the current issues in today's business world. These are the kinds of topics likely to be encountered in the current business press. Lectures are supplemented with real world case histories designed to highlight a specific topical, and often controversial, issue.
  • BUS 1000 Afternoon Workshop: “The Business of Planning” Students will apply principles of the morning course to create a business plan. By the completion of the course students will be able to describe their business, including its products, its markets, the people involved and their financing needs.
 
BUS 1000: Introduction to Business (Marketing focus), 3 credits
Students are given an overview of the study of business early in their college studies so that they can decide which field to major in and how the world of business works. The class is broken in four distinct parts - finance, marketing, management and an introductory section that covers ethics, global business and economics. Each of these parts covers the basic concepts found in one of the areas a student might select as a major. Each section also covers the current issues in today's business world.
  • BUS 1000 Afternoon Workshop: “Cornering the Market” Students will apply principles of the morning course to study an industry in the “Inverted Pyramid” form and its top two competitors therein. By the completion of the course students will create a competitive strategy supported by a marketing message and creative integrated marketing campaign (ads, PR, sales and promotion).
 
JRN 3050: Journalistic Writing, 3 credits
This course is designed to teach students the fundamentals of journalism - reporting, researching, and writing news and feature articles, with a focus on fairness, accuracy, balance, and thoroughness. Students will cover stories on a range of topics, most of which will be culled from their own communities. Assignments are designed to give students an introduction to reporting on both individuals and institutions. Interviewing techniques, database research, and writing style will be developed during the semester.
  • JRN 3050 Afternoon Workshop: “Here and Now” Students will apply principles from the morning course to create an online newspaper. Students will learn about the role of the press in society, how the media has evolved and what are the rights and responsibilities of the audience. The workshop will include visits from Journalists and field trips to various media outlets.
 
ANT 1001 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology 3 credits
An introduction to the historical and comparative study of what it means to be human, emphasizing both the shared conditions and the unique characteristics of the world's peoples. Included among the topics covered are questions of human origins and races, the nature of culture, relations between language and culture, and cross-cultural approaches to economics, politics, religion, gender, and social organization.
  • The ANT 1001 afternoon workshop will focus on the Changing New York; students will research and explore the changes occurring in several neighborhoods throughout New York City; this includes the Harlem, Williamsburg and the South Bronx. Students along with the Instructor will tour the changing neighborhoods; culminating into several group research projects that will present on how these neighborhoods have changed over the past decade.