Weissman School of Arts and Sciences

Fall 2013 – Special Topics

AAS 3085 CMWA� Ethnic Literature - Asian American
This course in Asian American Literature will survey Asian-American writers from 1950s to today. Through literature, class will examine such issues as ethnic identity, acculturation, response to racism. Readings include Toshio Mori, Bienvenido Santos, Ha Jin, Chang-rae Lee, and Gish Jen (Baruch’s fall writer-in-residence) and one or two films.

AAS 3085 ETRA� Modernization and Westernization in Asia
The year 1800 serves as the point of departure for the course. The major problem dealt with is what has been termed the response to the West. Using a comparative topical approach, the course examines how the West affected East Asia; why Japan succeeded in rapid industrialization; and why China is still in the process. Among topics dealt with are the Restoration movements, revolutions vs. evolution, imperialism, democracy in the Asian setting, and the rise of Communism. (Note: Same course as HIS 3852
)

AMS 4900 MTA � Searching for Identity in American Art and Culture: Theresa Bernstein and her Contemporaries, 1910-1950
This course will focus on Bernstein's art on view at the Sidney Mishkin Gallery at Baruch and the James Gallery at the Graduate Center from November 2013-January 2014 in the context of the events that shaped her world and some of the artists and luminaries who either influenced her work or intersected with it. Bernstein depicted Albert Einstein, Louis Armstrong, John Sloan, and Martha Graham, among many others. The events that shaped her life include the two world wars, the Woman's Suffrage movement, the Great Depression, and the founding of the State of Israel.

ART 3040 MTA � Searching for Identity in American Art and Culture: Theresa Bernstein and her Contemporaries, 1910-1950
This course will focus on Bernstein's art on view at the Sidney Mishkin Gallery at Baruch and the James Gallery at the Graduate Center from November 2013-January 2014 in the context of the events that shaped her world and some of the artists and luminaries who either influenced her work or intersected with it. Bernstein depicted Albert Einstein, Louis Armstrong, John Sloan, and Martha Graham, among many others. The events that shaped her life include the two world wars, the Woman's Suffrage movement, the Great Depression, and the founding of the State of Israel.

ART 3041 FMW Three-Dimensional Digital Design
This course examines the creation of three-dimensional forms (including construction, rendering, and output) using digital tools. Investigation of the fundamental principles of three-dimensional design (line-plane-volume-mass-space-light). Applied study of computer-aided design (CAD) programs and rapid prototyping (RP) technologies for three-dimensional visualization. Readings, case studies, and hands-on projects emphasize the development of critical skills and their application to design issues of the present. Potential applications for packaging, product, and industrial design as well as architecture, art, and new media.  Pre-requisite: ART 2050 or NMA 2050 or departmental permission.

ART 3041 VRA � Advertising Design and History 
The class will cover core components of advertising, including conceptual and creative thinking, art direction, copywriting and branding strategy, demonstrating how all these components translate into a visual solution. With an emphasis on print, this course will teach students how to conceive and design advertising for sophisticated consumers.

BLS 3085 ATRA � Imperialism, Colonialism, and Post-Colonialism
The course will explore a political, cultural, and economic analysis of imperialism, colonialism, and neo-colonialism in the Atlantic world with a particular focus on the Caribbean and Latin America.�� Why did western European empires form colonial and imperial empires? What was the United States policy toward imperialism and colonialism in the nineteenth and twentieth century? How did colonial subjects resist colonialism and imperialism? Also what were the cultural and economic legacies of colonialism and imperialism?


BLS 3085 CMWA The Haitian Revolution and Its Afterlives
In 1804 a group of military leaders gathered on the Caribbean island-colony of St. Domingue to declare the island’s independence from France and the birth of a new nation: Haiti. This class explores the events leading up to this momentous declaration, starting with an examination of the sugar-slave colony of St. Domingue in the late eighteenth century and the radical revolution that ultimately led to the overthrow of slavery and colonialism on the island. During the second half of the semester we will examine the legacy of the Haitian Revolution, considering both the response of the United States and Europe to the New World’s first successful slave revolt and the ways that international pressures and domestic problems combined to shape Haiti’s troubled history during the nineteenth, twentieth, and twentieth-first century.

BLS 3085 DMWA � Race and Gender in Contemporary Brazil
This course examine the role and tensions of gender, ethnicity and class issues between peoples and cultures in Brazil today. By reviewing a wide range of the country's cultural and artistic production, such as music, film, literature, politics and sports, as well as significant historical events and personalities, the challenges of a multicultural society will be explored.

CHI 4999 CMWA - Contemporary Chinese Short Stories

COM 4101 PTRA - Contemporary Issues in Digital Media
This course offers students a survey of topics and issues surrounding digital media. The first half of the course provides an introductory informative and historical perspectives on today’s digital media platforms, from the Internet to Facebook, Twitter, Wikipedia and Google. Through analysis and critical discussions, we aim to discuss the ways each of these technologies changes our understanding of what media are. The second half of the course examines the literature engaging the impact of these technologies across a wide array of issues, including: technopobia, privacy, data mining, digital activism, freedom and diversity of expression, hacking and more. Course materials are drawn from various academic fields spanning law, internet studies, globalization and social theory. The overall aim of the course is to provide a critical media literacy for students through the development of the necessary lexicon and critical framework than can aid them in thinking about these crucial developments and issues that redefine how we understand media and communications.

COM 4101 UMA - Diversity & Leadership
What is diversity and inclusion? What is leadership? What happens when you end up blending both of them together? These are the questions that we’ll address this semester in COM 4101. Over the past few decades, this country and organizations have seen a huge shift in how we look at groups and the workplace. Our workplaces are complex, diverse and less traditional. There are several generations working in one place; more women are in the workplace; we work with people next to us and also across the world; technology has changed how we do business. So how do we prepare for this complex system? In this course, students are encouraged to use lessons learned in other courses. The underlying concept is that there are always different ways to approach a task. During this term students will have opportunities to look at how strong leaders communicate; how to ensure that all individuals are fully included in the workplace.

COM 4900 AMWA - Language and Social Interaction
This course introduces an ethnographic approach to language and interpersonal communication. Such an approach tries to understand the bases for social relations and social interaction based on the observation of, and the participation in, actual instances of interpersonal communication. Concerns of face, speech acts, person-referring forms, terms for talk, relational dialectics, narrative, and rules and norms are introduced as theoretical frameworks for the analysis of interpersonal communication. We will turn our attention to moments of intercultural communication since different cultural communicative patterns for interpersonal communication are active there. These often result in miscommunication, negative stereotyping, injustices, discrimination, and the like.

COM 4900 ETRA - Conflict Resolution
This course explores conflict resolution in interpersonal, intergroup, intercultural, and international communication. Topics include causes and manifestations of conflict, the concept of emotional intelligence, effects of violence in the media, interpersonal conflict resolution techniques, non-violence and peace education, sources of intercultural conflict and intercultural conflict management styles, as well as current international conflicts and resolution efforts.

COM 4900 FMWA - Ethics of Professional Communication
This course explores the complexities, challenges, and goals of management communication, both the personal management of one’s responsibilities and welfare within an organization and larger communication-management issues.� Assignments range from applications involving individual communication issues as well as organization-wide strategic planning and improvement efforts.� The global goal of the course is to motivate individual and collective commitment to best practices.

COM 4900 PMWA - Conflict Resolution
This course explores conflict resolution in interpersonal, intergroup, intercultural, and international communication. Topics include causes and manifestations of conflict, the concept of emotional intelligence, effects of violence in the media, interpersonal conflict resolution techniques, non-violence and peace education, sources of intercultural conflict and intercultural conflict management styles, as well as current international conflicts and resolution efforts.

COM 4900 PTRA - Internal Communication
This capstone course introduces the role and value of strategic internal communication within today’s global business organizations and reviews the evolution of the practice from a one-way mode of communication to a valuable, strategic business function impacting organizational effectiveness. Special topics in internal communication will be explored, such as internal branding, the CEO’s role in the internal communications process, the importance of research as the foundation for communications strategy development, and effective methods of communicating with employees during change situations. We will also discuss challenges and issues communicators face in trying to reach employees at all levels and examine strategies and tools for developing a united, engaged and productive workforce.

Throughout the course, we’ll read and discuss articles, research reports and case studies that support our understanding and application of strategic internal communication. You will apply what you’ve learned to independent and group projects. Several practicing internal communication professionals will also be speaking with us to bridge classroom and workplace practice.

COM 4900 URA - Conflict Resolution
This course explores conflict resolution in interpersonal, intergroup, intercultural, and international communication. Topics include causes and manifestations of conflict, the concept of emotional intelligence, effects of violence in the media, interpersonal conflict resolution techniques, non-violence and peace education, sources of intercultural conflict and intercultural conflict management styles, as well as current international conflicts and resolution efforts.

COM 9660 UTA - Corporate Representation in Film, Television, Advertising, and New Media
This course critically explores how corporations and the people who work in them have been represented in film, television, advertising and new media and what corporate communication specialists can learn from this rich visual history.  We begin with some of the earliest cinematic representations of business, including Employees Leaving the Lumi�re Factory (1895), A Corner in Wheat (1912), King Vidor’s The Crowd (1928), Strike (Sergei Eisenstein, 1925), Modern Times (1936), The Man in the Gray Flannel Suit (1956), Wall Street (1987), Office Space (1999), Boiler Room (2000), The Apartment (1960), Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps (2010), and Margin Call (2011).  In the case of non-fiction films such as The Corporation (2003), Capitalism:  A Love Story (2009), Enron, The Smartest Guys in the Room (2005) and Inside Job (2010), we will consider how documentary representations serve the dual function of being both whistle blowers and flame fanners.  From the world of television we will examine such examples as Patterns, The Office (BBC and NBC), and Mad Men (AMC).  Case studies from new media include and fan-based corporate web pages, blogs, and social media.  No previous background in film studies is necessary, although students will be required to pre-screen certain films (available streaming via Baruch library's website) prior to the class meeting.  Course readings will integrate film, visual, cultural, and corporate communication studies theory.  Assignments include close textual analysis of screenings, in-class presentations, take-home midterm, and a final-15 page research paper.

ENG 3032 CMWA - Ethnic Literature:  Asian American Literature
Survey of Asian-American writers from 1950s to today. Through literature, class will examine such issues as ethnic identity, acculturation, response to racism. Readings include Toshio Mori, Bienvenido Santos, Ha Jin, Chang-rae Lee, and Gish Jen (Baruch’s fall writer-in-residence) and one or two films.

ENG 3610 NW - Harman Fiction Writing Workshop
Now There's a Story:� The Art of Narrative - / Gish Jen
The Fall Harman Fiction Honors workshop will be taught by the distinguished fiction writer Gish Jen, author of World and Town, Typical American, Mona in the Promised Land and The Love Wife as well as a collection of stories entitled, Who’s Irish?

This workshop will focus on the molding of stories.� We will begin by telling the stories we all have -- stories about our dreams, our origins, our loved ones, our enemies.� We will tell stories about what we believe; what we remember; what we want to remember; and what we want to forget.� And then we will focus on retelling them -- on trying to give them form, on trying to give them resonance, on trying to get to their ache and meat and life.� We will not confine ourselves to "what really happened"; neither we will not confine ourselves to what we know, or our own point of view.� Rather, we will try and use our stories as vehicles of exploration and discovery, even as we consider just what makes a story a good story.� Our reading will range from F.C. Bartlett's Remembering to William Fleisch's Comeuppance -- as well, of course, as some whopping good stories.

ENG 3610H NWH - Honors Harman Fiction Writing Workshop
Now There's a Story:� The Art of Narrative / Gish Jen
The Fall Harman Fiction Honors workshop will be taught by the distinguished fiction writer Gish Jen, author of World and Town, Typical American, Mona in the Promised Land and The Love Wife as well as a collection of stories entitled, Who’s Irish?

This workshop will focus on the molding of stories.� We will begin by telling the stories we all have -- stories about our dreams, our origins, our loved ones, our enemies.� We will tell stories about what we believe; what we remember; what we want to remember; and what we want to forget.� And then we will focus on retelling them -- on trying to give them form, on trying to give them resonance, on trying to get to their ache and meat and life.� We will not confine ourselves to "what really happened"; neither we will not confine ourselves to what we know, or our own point of view.� Rather, we will try and use our stories as vehicles of exploration and discovery, even as we consider just what makes a story a good story.� Our reading will range from F.C. Bartlett's Remembering to William Fleisch's Comeuppance -- as well, of course, as some whopping good stories.

ENG 3950 BTRA - James Baldwin
James Baldwin (1924-1987), the author, child evangelist, civil rights activist, and social critic wrote a range of essays, poems, plays and novels that continue to spark debate about the United States, American identity, race, democracy, sexuality, gender, freedom and God.  In this course, we will study his writing including Go Tell it on the Mountain (1953), Giovanni’s Room (1956), Another Country (1962), The Fire Next Time (1963), Blues for Mister Charlie (1964), and Notes of a Native Son (1955) We will explore his craft as a writer to analyze his tremendous influence as a social and cultural critic within his contemporary contexts of New York, Paris, and Istanbul.

ENG 4230 BTRA - Topics in Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Literature: The Eighteenth-Century British Novel
In 1740, a novel about a young servant girl took Britain by storm. Samuel Richardson's Pamela, widely regarded as the first bestseller, provoked both great acclaim and scathing criticism. It also drew increasing attention to the genre of the novel itself--at the time still a nebulous set of fictional practices rather than a coherent, recognizable form. How did the novel (at first considered silly or even illicit) become a respectable art form? Why, after such a tumultuous early history, are we still reading novels today? This course will consider the early novel in all its formal variety, while asking larger questions about the political, cultural, and historical phenomena that catalyzed its emergence. In addition to Richardson, authors will include Daniel Defoe, Eliza Haywood, Henry Fielding, Frances Burney, and Jane Austin.

FLM 4900 NFA- Hollywood Goes to War: The Films of World War II
Like the rest of the country, Hollywood did not go to war until December 7, 1941, after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor.� This was the day, said FDR, that would “live in infamy.”� A woefully unprepared country suddenly had to gear up for war, and with allies like the Soviet Union, which had not enjoyed widespread support in America.� Now everything changed: In films like The North Star (1943), the Russian peasant suddenly became the salt of the earth worth supporting in the fight alongside Germany, as exemplified in Hangman Also Die (1943), which exposed Nazi terror in occupied countries like Czechoslovakia.� Other films such as The Purple Heart (1944) exposed the atrocities of the Japanese. Still other films like A Walk in the Sun (1945) explored the fighting spirit of American soldiers on the battlefield.� This course will explore these films and others�mostly made during the war�to show what Hollywood contributed to American morale and to the ideology of a nation fighting to liberate a world in danger of succumbing to tyranny.� To put these films in perspective, later films such as Saving Private Ryan (1998) will be screened to reveal how American reactions to World War II have evolved.�

HIS 3460 CMWA - Anglo-American Legal History
Legal history is the study of the history of law -- its roots, the historical foundation for its structure, and the evolution of important legal concepts.� In this course, we will consider the historical development of law in Great Britain and the United States, including some of the major historical debates over how law could best serve the interests of society.� Topics to be considered will include the rule of law, due process of law, liberty, and others.� This course would be great background for students considering a legal career.

HIS 3460 CTRA�(Friedman Seminar)- World War II
This course examines the most destructive war in the history of mankind, a conflict that cost more than 55 million lives, brought about a fundamental restructuring of global affairs, hastened the decline of European influence in the world, and precipitated the growth of American and Soviet power that shaped global affairs for the remainder of the twentieth century.

Designated a Friedman seminar, it introduces students to advanced modes of historical analysis, develops their ability to understand and critique historiographical controversies, and furthers their ability to conduct primary source research. Tracing cause-and-effect relationships that led to the outbreak of global conflict in 1939-1941, it examines the origins of World War II in the larger context of European, American, and Asian history since 1918. It also explores controversies among historians who have offered a variety of different (and sometimes conflicting) interpretations of the war’s origins and its ultimate outcome. In addition to advanced secondary sources, students will read a variety of primary documents, reconstruct their meanings and biases, develop their context, and utilize them to explain key events and developments of World War II.

HIS 3460 MFA - American Politics and Society Since Vietnam
This course will examine the major political, economic, and social trends in American life in the years since the end of the Vietnam War. Beginning with the energy crises, stagflation, and economic uncertainty of the Ford and Carter years, we will continue into the 1980s, studying the Reagan administration's transformative social and economic policies, before concluding in the 1990s with a consideration of globalization and the digital revolution. Topics will include deindustrialization, deregulation, foreign policy, "trickle down" economics, the Wal-Mart business model, "culture wars," and the dot com crash.

HIS 3860 CMWA The Haitian Revolution and Its Afterlives
In 1804 a group of military leaders gathered on the Caribbean island-colony of St. Domingue to declare the island’s independence from France and the birth of a new nation: Haiti. This class explores the events leading up to this momentous declaration, starting with an examination of the sugar-slave colony of St. Domingue in the late eighteenth century and the radical revolution that ultimately led to the overthrow of slavery and colonialism on the island. During the second half of the semester we will examine the legacy of the Haitian Revolution, considering both the response of the United States and Europe to the New World’s first successful slave revolt and the ways that international pressures and domestic problems combined to shape Haiti’s troubled history during the nineteenth, twentieth, and twentieth-first century. 

JWS 4900 MTA � Searching for Identity in American Art and Culture: Theresa Bernstein and her Contemporaries, 1910-1950
This course will focus on Bernstein's art on view at the Sidney Mishkin Gallery at Baruch and the James Gallery at the Graduate Center from November 2013-January 2014 in the context of the events that shaped her world and some of the artists and luminaries who either influenced her work or intersected with it. Bernstein depicted Albert Einstein, Louis Armstrong, John Sloan, and Martha Graham, among many others. The events that shaped her life include the two world wars, the Woman's Suffrage movement, the Great Depression, and the founding of the State of Israel.

IDC 4050H CMWH - Humor Matters  
This course takes a deep and broad exploration of humor as a pervasive feature of human existence. The class covers types of humor and comedy, including wit, wordplay, satire, parody, irony, and more�and theories of why we laugh, why humor is a learnable skill, and how the art and science of humor benefits the body and soul. The course will use New York City as a vibrant laboratory for exploring the comic side of life, including outings to watch stand-up comedy performances and shows like The Book of Mormon. The class will also cover how humor has been applied across many areas of human endeavor, for example, the therapeutic uses of humor in healthcare and social service settings. Additionally, the course will focus on the use of humor in cross-cultural communication, especially in breaking down taboos, and issues related to race, ethnicity, and religion. Course materials will include academic and professional works on humor, clips from a variety of media, and collaborative, practical assignments. In examining what makes people laugh and why, the course attempts to connect participants with many of the things that make us most fully human.

IDC 4050H ETRH - Animal Communication/Human Conversation
“Birds do it, bees do it, even educated fleas do it” as songwriter Cole Porter wrote.� He wasn’t referring to language and communication � but he could have been. Is language unique to humans or do other organisms have their own languages? How do animals communicate without speech? Is intelligence a prerequisite for language?� Can language be acquired at any age? Does written language change the way people think? Explore these questions with an evolutionary biologist and a linguist and determine for yourself what constitutes language.� Topics we plan to examine include: bacterial quorum sensing, bee dances, bird songs, primate communication, feral children, and human language development, oral and written.� We will screen relevant videos including Project NIM, Animal Einsteins and Animal Minds and read a variety of articles drawn from the scientific literature and relevant books, including Steven Pinker, The Language Instinct and Susan Curtiss, Genie: A Psycholinguistic Study of a Modern Day “Wild Child”. Students will be expected to participate actively and to produce independent research

IDC 4050H PTRH - War and the Arc of Human Experience
In this seminar we aim to examine some of the social, psychological, and cultural forces that predispose young men and woman to join the military and seek out combat and other forms of military service; the nature of war and its effects on those caught up in it (including both warriors, noncombatants and their families); and the impacts war has on the later lives of those who survive it. Much of Glenn Albright’s current work as a psychologist is on Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and war trauma and he is deeply involved in developing support services for veterans at Baruch. Glenn Petersen is a Vietnam vet, has recently been writing on war-related issues, and teaches on the anthropology of peace and war. We will draw on materials from our respective fields as well as on literature and the other humanities and social sciences. We are eager to have some of Baruch’s veterans participate in this seminar.

JRN 3610 NWA - Harman Fiction Writing Workshop
Now There's a Story:� The Art of Narrative - Gish Jen
The Fall Harman Fiction workshop will be taught by the distinguished fiction writer Gish Jen, author of World and Town, Typical American, Mona in the Promised Land and The Love Wife as well as a collection of stories entitled, Who’s Irish?

This workshop will focus on the molding of stories.� We will begin by telling the stories we all have -- stories about our dreams, our origins, our loved ones, our enemies. �We will tell stories about what we believe; what we remember; what we want to remember; and what we want to forget.� And then we will focus on retelling them -- on trying to give them form, on trying to give them resonance, on trying to get to their ache and meat and life.� We will not confine ourselves to "what really happened"; neither we will not confine ourselves to what we know, or our own point of view.� Rather, we will try and use our stories as vehicles of exploration and discovery, even as we consider just what makes a story a good story.� Our reading will range from F.C. Bartlett's Remembering to William Fleisch's Comeuppance -- as well, of course, as some whopping good stories.

JRN 3610H NWH � Honors Harman Fiction Writing Workshop
Now There's a Story:� The Art of Narrative - Gish Jen

The Fall Harman Fiction Honors workshop will be taught by the distinguished fiction writer Gish Jen, author of World and Town, Typical American, Mona in the Promised Land and The Love Wife as well as a collection of stories entitled, Who’s Irish?

This workshop will focus on the molding of stories.� We will begin by telling the stories we all have -- stories about our dreams, our origins, our loved ones, our enemies.� We will tell stories about what we believe; what we remember; what we want to remember; and what we want to forget.� And then we will focus on retelling them -- on trying to give them form, on trying to give them resonance, on trying to get to their ache and meat and life.� We will not confine ourselves to "what really happened"; neither we will not confine ourselves to what we know, or our own point of view.� Rather, we will try and use our stories as vehicles of exploration and discovery, even as we consider just what makes a story a good story.� Our reading will range from F.C. Bartlett's Remembering to William Fleisch's Comeuppance -- as well, of course, as some whopping good stories.

JRN 3900 ETRA - Creating and Producing an Online Magazine
This course will prepare students to create their own magazine or contribute in a variety of ways to online publications. Among the topics that will be covered are strategic planning, identifying audiences, scheduling assignments to reflect the calendar and the seasons, managing a staff, editor-reporter interactions and effective use of multimedia, including photography, audio and video. While technology experts will provide tutorials in the necessary tools, the course is not about technology but about what makes a good publication, focusing on content and staffing. The course is lab-based and hands-on, but with many discussions.

 JRN 3900 MFA  - The Art and Practice of Biography
This seminar begins with readings in the history of biography, then shifts to assignments about the current practice of writing biographical narratives and short profiles. The class will include visits from important biographers and investigate the uses of biography in the media. Students will have option of writing biographical narratives or producing multimedia projects. All students will be required to contribute to the class blog.

LTS 3085 ATRA � Imperialism, Colonialism, and Post-Colonialism
The course will explore a political, cultural, and economic analysis of imperialism, colonialism, and neo-colonialism in the Atlantic world with a particular focus on the Caribbean and Latin America.�� Why did western European empires form colonial and imperial empires? What was the United States policy toward imperialism and colonialism in the nineteenth and twentieth century? How did colonial subjects resist colonialism and imperialism? Also what were the cultural and economic legacies of colonialism and imperialism?

LTS 3085 CMWA The Haitian Revolution and Its Afterlives
In 1804 a group of military leaders gathered on the Caribbean island-colony of St. Domingue to declare the island’s independence from France and the birth of a new nation: Haiti. This class explores the events leading up to this momentous declaration, starting with an examination of the sugar-slave colony of St. Domingue in the late eighteenth century and the radical revolution that ultimately led to the overthrow of slavery and colonialism on the island. During the second half of the semester we will examine the legacy of the Haitian Revolution, considering both the response of the United States and Europe to the New World’s first successful slave revolt and the ways that international pressures and domestic problems combined to shape Haiti’s troubled history during the nineteenth, twentieth, and twentieth-first century.

LTS 3085 DMWA - Race and Gender in Contemporary Brazil
This course examine the role and tensions of gender, ethnicity and class issues between peoples and cultures in Brazil today. By reviewing a wide range of the country's cultural and artistic production, such as music, film, literature, politics and sports, as well as significant historical events and personalities, the challenges of a multicultural society will be explored.

NMA 3041 FMW Three-Dimensional Digital Design
This course examines the creation of three-dimensional forms (including construction, rendering, and output) using digital tools. Investigation of the fundamental principles of three-dimensional design (line-plane-volume-mass-space-light). Applied study of computer-aided design (CAD) programs and rapid prototyping (RP) technologies for three-dimensional visualization. Readings, case studies, and hands-on projects emphasize the development of critical skills and their application to design issues of the present. Potential applications for packaging, product, and industrial design as well as architecture, art, and new media.  Pre-requisite: ART 2050 or NMA 2050 or departmental permission.

NMA 3041 VMA � Intermediate Web Projects, Interactivity and Dynamic Content
Students will learn to create interactive and dynamic content for the web. Students will learn to exploit the latest and most powerful techniques by coding their own projects. This course is an intermediate-level course geared for students with prior experience in HTML and CSS.  Prerequisite:  ART 3057 or departmental permission.

 

PHI 4900 CMWA - Capstone: Personal Identity

PHI 4905 PMWA - Capstone: Global Warming

POL 4900 CMWA - Democratic Politics in Comparative Perspective

POL 4900 CTRA - Capstone:  Federalist Papers

POL 4900 DMWA - Capstone:  Demcracy & Private Property

POL 4900 EMWA - Democratic Politics in Comparative Perspective

POL 4900 PMWA - The Politics of the Global Economy

PSY 3036 CTRA � Psychology and Popular Culture

PSY 3040 CMWA - Sports Psychology

PSY 3040 EMWA - Psychology of Discrimination: Racism, Sexism and Other Isms
This course explores the psychological underpinnings of prejudice and discrimination using foundational theories in cognitive, social, personality and industrial organizational psychology. The course will cover well-recognized forms of prejudice and discrimination, such as racism, sexism, anti-Semitism, and heterosexism.

Note: This course cannot be taken if you have already taken PSY 3040 Psychology of Stereotypes and Prejudice.

PSY 3040 FMWA - Psychology of Discrimination: Racism, Sexism and Other Isms
This course explores the psychological underpinnings of prejudice and discrimination using foundational theories in cognitive, social, personality and industrial organizational psychology. The course will cover well-recognized forms of prejudice and discrimination, such as racism, sexism, anti-Semitism, and heterosexism.

Note: This course cannot be taken if you have already taken PSY 3040 Psychology of Stereotypes and Prejudice.

PSY 3040 FTRA - Psychology of Discrimination: Racism, Sexism and Other Isms
This course explores the psychological underpinnings of prejudice and discrimination using foundational theories in cognitive, social, personality and industrial organizational psychology. The course will cover well-recognized forms� of prejudice and discrimination, such as racism, sexism, anti-Semitism, and heterosexism.

Note: This course cannot be taken if you have already taken PSY 3040 Psychology of Stereotypes and Prejudice.

 PSY 9786 UTA - Employee Attitudes and Surveys

PSY 9786 URA - Interpersonal Skills in Organizations

PSY 9786 URB - Developing Leaders

SOC 3085 ETRA Sociology of the Internet
This course will examine how the Internet and its related new information and communication technologies (NICTs) have transformed society over the past 40 years.�

While the emergence of the Internet may seem uniquely revolutionary in how it alters contemporary social life, each previous innovation in telecommunications over the course of the 20th century (telephone, radio, film, and television) was also seen as uniquely revolutionary and emancipatory.�

However, while each technology changed society in fundamental ways, the larger context and social structure (monopolies, industries, laws, governments, regulations, etc.) largely dictated how each of these technologies would be channeled and experienced by individuals.�

Thus, we will view the emergence of the Internet as part of the history of telecom.�

SPA 4999 PMWA � A Century of Cuban Cinema


The City University of New York