Course Description Detail Page

POL 1101 American Government: Practices and Values
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

An analysis of democratic ideas and practices, with special reference to the American Constitution and the democratic process in the United States.

Baruch Common Core (for students who entered Baruch prior to Fall 2013): This course satisfies the Tier II Politics and Government requirement.

CUNY Pathways at Baruch (for students who entered Baruch Fall 2013 or later, or who “opt-in” to CUNY Pathways): This course satisfies the “U.S. Experience in its Diversity” requirement of the Flexible Core.

Prerequisite: None

POL 1101H Hon Amer Gov Prac
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This course presents an analysis of democratic ideas and practices, with special reference to the American Constitution and the democratic process in the United States.

This course satisfies the Tier II Politics and Government requirement of the Baruch Common Core Curriculum (for students who entered Baruch prior to Fall 2013).

This course satisfies the “U.S. Experience in its Diversity” requirement of the CUNY Pathways Flexible Core (for students who entered Baruch Fall 2013 or later, or who “opt-in” to CUNY Pathways).

Prerequisite: None

POL 2001 The United States in an Age of Globalization
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This course presents the United States in the context of globalization, and considers the structures and processes integrating the world. The course examines two basic questions: How does the United States affect these structures and processes, and how does the rest of the world shape American politics and society?

Baruch Common Core (for students who entered Baruch prior to Fall 2013): This course satisfies the Tier II Politics and Government requirement.

CUNY Pathways at Baruch (for students who entered Baruch Fall 2013 or later, or who “opt-in” to CUNY Pathways): This course satisfies the “World Cultures and Global Issues” requirement of the Flexible Core.

Prerequisite: ENG 2100 or its equivalent.

POL 2001H Hon U.S. Age of Glob
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This course presents the United States in the context of globalization, and considers the structures and processes integrating the world. The course examines two basic questions: How does the United States affect these structures and processes, and how does the rest of the world shape American politics and society?

This course satisfies the Tier II Politics and Government requirement of the Baruch Common Core Curriculum (for students who entered Baruch prior to Fall 2013).

This course satisfies the “World Cultures and Global Issues” requirement of the CUNY Pathways Flexible Core (for students who entered Baruch Fall 2013 or later, or who “opt-in” to CUNY Pathways).

Prerequisite: ENG 2100 or its equivalent.

POL 2220 State and Local Government
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

A study of the legislative and administrative process of states, counties, municipalities, and special districts. This course analyzes the increasing importance of the administrative and the executive in modern government; the relationship between the administrative, the legislative, and judicial branches of the government; and the influence of political parties, pressure groups, and public opinion upon legislation and administration.

Prerequisite: ENG 2100 or its equivalent.

POL 2240 Introduction to International Relations
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

An introduction to the study of the dynamics of national power; the state system, nationalism and imperialism, and the quest for a cooperative international society; diplomacy, international law and organization, and defining the national interest of a country.

Prerequisite: ENG 2100 or its equivalent.

POL 2260 Introduction to Comparative Government
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

An introduction to the comparative study of policy formation and execution in contemporary governments from the perspectives of governmental structures and political processes. Emphasis is on developing concepts of comparative government.

Baruch Common Core (for students who entered Baruch prior to Fall 2013): This course does not satisfy any requirements.

CUNY Pathways at Baruch (for students who entered Baruch Fall 2013 or later, or who “opt-in” to CUNY Pathways): This course satisfies the “World Cultures and Global Issues” requirement of the Flexible Core.

Prerequisite: ENG 2100 or its equivalent.

POL 2280 THE GREAT POLITICAL DEBATES: THE INDIVIDUAL AND SOCIETY
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This course examines the oldest problem in politics, the relation between the individual and society, by analyzing ancient and modern texts. Among the topics considered are citizenship and its obligations, tolerance, and the scope of public authority.

ENG 2100 or equivalent

POL 2313H Hon Constitut Law
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This course focuses upon major constitutional problems in the United States, e.g., federalism, separation of powers, the commerce clause, judicial review, and equal protection of the laws (principally, regarding questions of race). Supreme Court decisions are analyzed, as well as appropriate other material.

Prerequisite: ENG 2100 or its equivalent.

POL 2314H Hon Civil Liberty
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This course focuses upon the relation of the judicial process and constitutional law to individual freedom in the United States, chiefly to the context of freedom of expression and privacy. Court decisions and other appropriate materials are analyzed.

Prerequisite: ENG 2100 or its equivalent.

POL 2321 Urban Government
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

Survey of important approaches to the study of urban political systems. The course concentrates on the nature of cities, their contemporary problems, and the political structures used to solve these problems.

Baruch Common Core (for students who entered Baruch prior to Fall 2013): This course satisfies the Tier II Politics and Government requirement.

CUNY Pathways at Baruch (for students who entered Baruch Fall 2013 or later, or who “opt-in” to CUNY Pathways): This course does not satisfy any CUNY Pathways requirements.

Prerequisite: ENG 2100 or its equivalent.

POL 2332 American Political Thought
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

A study of significant political ideas in the American experience, from their European origins to the present, with attention given to the influence of these ideas in the development of American political institutions.

Baruch Common Core (for students who entered Baruch prior to Fall 2013): This course satisfies the Tier II Politics and Government requirement.

CUNY Pathways at Baruch (for students who entered Baruch Fall 2013 or later, or who “opt-in” to CUNY Pathways): This course satisfies the “U.S. Experience in its Diversity” requirement of the Flexible Core.

Prerequisite: ENG 2100 or its equivalent.

POL 2353 Public Policy
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

An examination of the role and impact of major forces and institutions that affect formation and reformation of American public policy. A variety of public policy issues, such as busing, educational finance, the women's movement, civil rights, crime, abortion, and budgeting, are examined from different theoretical perspectives. Attention is given to comparable issues arising in other nations.

Baruch Common Core (for students who entered Baruch prior to Fall 2013): This course satisfies the Tier II Politics and Government requirement.

CUNY Pathways at Baruch (for students who entered Baruch Fall 2013 or later, or who “opt-in” to CUNY Pathways): This course does not satisfy any CUNY Pathways requirements.

Prerequisite: ENG 2100 or its equivalent.

POL 3001 Women: Politics and Policy
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This course examines the modern women's movement and its impact on key policy areas: employment, family policy, education, reproductive rights, pornography, and criminal justice.

Prerequisite: POL 1101 or 2353.

POL 3005 Social Welfare Policy
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

Focusing on the development of U.S. social welfare policy, the course examines the U.S. system in cross-national perspective, addresses historical developments since 1900, and explores several contemporary challenges, including the underclass, the feminization of poverty, and welfare reform.

This course is cross-listed as HIS 3005. Students may receive credit for either POL 3005 or HIS 3005, not both.

Prerequisite: One course in political science, history, or sociology; ENG 2100 or equivalent.

POL 3008 Religion And Politics In The United States
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This course investigates the role of religion in American political life from the nation's founding to the present era. Church-state issues will be addressed from the perspectives of political theory and constitutional law. Cultural cleavages on such issues as prohibition, Sunday observance, the teaching of evolution, and, more recently, on abortion, school prayer, parochial school aid, civil liberties and the gay rights will be explored. The implications of religious divisions for the American political party and electoral systems will also be examined using historical and political science studies.

This course is equivalent to HIS 3008 and REL 3008. Students will receive credit for only one of these courses. These courses may not substitute for each other in the F grade replacement policy.

Prerequisite: ENG 2150 and one of the following: HIS 1004, 1005,2050, or 2053; POL 1101,2332, 3310, 3313, or 3314.

POL 3008H Hon Rel & Pol in US
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This course investigates the role of religion in American political life from the nation's founding to the present era. Church-state issues will be addressed from the perspectives of political theory and constitutional law. Cultural cleavages on such issues as prohibition, Sunday observance, the teaching of evolution, and, more recently, on abortion, school prayer, parochial school aid, civil liberties and the gay rights will be explored. The implications of religious divisions for the American political party and electoral systems will also be examined using historical and political science studies.

This course is equivalent to HIS 3008 and REL 3008. Students will receive credit for only one of these courses. These courses may not substitute for each other in the F grade replacement policy.

Prerequisite: ENG 2150 and one of the following: HIS 1004, 1005,2050, or 2053; POL 1101,2332, 3310, 3313, or 3314.

POL 3062 Political Sociology
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

A cross-disciplinary course focusing on the substantive concerns of political science and employing theoretical perspectives developed in sociology, including the analysis of political movements, political structures, political behavior, and contemporary issues.

This course is cross-listed as SOC 3062. Students will receive credit for either POL 3062 or SOC 3062, not both.

Prerequisite: POL 3310 or 3333 or 3340 or SOC 1005 or departmental permission.

POL 3086 The Modern Middle East and North Africa
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

A study of the region from the beginnings of modernization in the nineteenth century to the present. The course focuses on two themes: the history of development and various conflicts generated between rival nation-states, especially Israel and the Arab countries.

This course is identical to HIS 3086. Students will receive credit for either POL 3086 or HIS 3086, not both.

Prerequisite: ENG 2100 or its equivalent.

POL 3101 Political Psychology
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

The exploration of political behavior from a psychological perspective, with special attention devoted to selected topics, such as aggression and violence, prejudice and discrimination, obedience and conformity, and personality and psychopathology.

This course is cross-listed as PSY 3101. Students will receive credit for either POL 3101 or PSY 3101, not both. Note: In order to receive credit for PSY 3101, students must have PSY 1001 as a prerequisite.

Prerequisite: POL 3310 or 3333 or 3340 (2340) or PSY 1001 or departmental permission.

POL 3102 American Conservatism: Origins, Development, And Contemporary Controversies
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This course examines through the use of theoretical, historical, and empirical analyses the conservative movement in the United States. The emphasis will be on post-World War II conservatism with the focus on conservative intellectuals, McCarthyism, the Goldwater phenomenon, neo-conservatism, the rise of the religious right, and the culture wars. Divisions in contemporary conservatism with respect to the issues of immigration, trade policy, abortion, gun control, and foreign policy will be examined. The impact of conservatism on the American political party system will also be explored.

This course is equivalent to HIS 3102. Students will receive credit for either POL 3102 or HIS 3102, not both. These courses may not substitute for each other in the F grade replacement policy.

Prerequisite: One of the following: POL 1101, POL 2332, HIS 1004, HIS 1005, HIS 2053, PUB 1250, or permission of the department.

POL 3103 Political Economy
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

The course examines the role of government in securing prosperity and economic development in the context of free market, socialist, and mixed economic systems. The management of enterprises and of entire economies and their impact on the political system will be considered.

Prerequisite: ENG 2100 or equivalent and ECO 1001 or 1002 or departmental permission.

POL 3104 The Politics of the Third World
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This course examines the political process in the developing nations of Latin America, Africa, and Asia from a developmental and comparative perspective, with particular attention to the types of political systems in the Third World and to such issues as nation building, governmental legitimacy, economic development, coups and revolutions, and elections.

Prerequisite: ENG 2100 or its equivalent.

POL 3201 Topics in Politics and Literature
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This course examines the relation of politics to literature, focusing in different semesters on such questions as, What can literature teach us about politics?; What literatures emerge from politics?; and What is the impact of politics on literature? Fiction, poetry, and drama on such themes as political commitment, domination and totalitarianism, tradition, leadership, democracy, racism, colonialism, and revolution are read, along with critical writings.

This course is identical to ENG 3201. Students will receive credit for either POL 3201 or ENG 3201, not both.

Prerequisite: ENG 2100 or its equivalent.

POL 3220 POL 3220 State and Local Government
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This course examines the legislative and administrative process of states, counties, municipalities, and special districts. Students analyze the increasing importance of the administrative and the executive in modern government; the relationship among the executive, legislative, and judicial branches of the government; and the influence of political parties, pressure groups, and public opinion upon legislation and administration.

Prerequisite: ENG 2100 or equivalent, and one of the following: POL 1101 or 2353; or departmental permission.

POL 3233 Political and Administrative Research
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

An introduction to the foundations of political and administrative research, with special emphasis placed on the philosophy of social science, research design, measurement, data collection procedures, and data analysis and interpretation. Students may participate in field research activities.

This course is identical to PUB 3233. Students will receive credit for either POL 3233 or PUB 3233, not both.

Prerequisite: POL 1101 and one additional course in political science or departmental permission.

POL 3310 Political Opinion
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This course introduces the student to the nature and role of public opinion in contemporary America. It focuses on the formation and measurement of opinion, the distribution of opinion among key social groups, and the linkages between public opinion and government action on race relations, welfare and abortion.

Prerequisite: ENG 2100 or equivalent, and one of the following: POL 1101, 2321, 2332, or 2353.

POL 3311 Political Parties and Elections
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This course examines the American political party and electoral system from their beginnings to their present status. Topics include the origins and characteristics of the American party system, winning the right to vote, elections and voting behavior, and political parties in government.

Prerequisite: ENG 2100 or equivalent, and one of the following: POL 1101, 2321, 2332, or 2353.

POL 3312 Congress and the Legislative Process
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

A study of legislative figures, norms, structures, and processes and the role of legislative bodies, with special reference to the United States Congress, relations between the Senate and House, and members of Congress and their clienteles.

Prerequisite: ENG 2100 or its equivalent.

POL 3313 Constitutional Law
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This course focuses upon major constitutional problems in the United States, e.g., federalism, separation of powers, the commerce clause, judicial review, and equal protection of the laws (principally, regarding questions of race and gender discrimination). Supreme Court decisions are analyzed, as well as appropriate other material.

Prerequisite: ENG 2100 or its equivalent.

POL 3314 Civil Liberties
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This course focuses upon the relation of the judicial process and constitutional law to individual freedom in the United States, chiefly to the context of freedom of expression and privacy. Court decisions and other appropriate materials are analyzed.

Prerequisite: ENG 2100 or its equivalent.

POL 3315 Government and the American Economy
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

The relationship of government to various economic forces and entities. The role of the government as promoter, regulator, and stabilizer of the economic system, as viewed from a political perspective.

Prerequisite: POL 1101 or departmental permission.

POL 3316 The Presidency
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

Analysis of the role of the presidency in American government. Includes an examination of the development of the office; its relationship to other political, social, and economic institutions; and the duties of the President as chief executive, chief legislator, commander in chief, party leader, head of state, and shaper of foreign policy.

Prerequisite: ENG 2100 or its equivalent.

POL 3317 The Politics of Energy and the Environment
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

An analysis of politics and policies relating to energy, resources, and the environment, including consideration of current problems and policy responses, principal political actors, and future prospects.

Prerequisite: POL 1101 or ENV 1020 (ECL 1020) or ENV 3001 or departmental permission.

POL 3318 Immigration and Integration in the United States
3.0 Hours, 3.0 Credits

This course examines how governmental institutions, political actors, and socio-political processes have both shaped and responded to immigration to the United States, with an emphasis on the post-1965 period. The course covers the politics and policies of immigrant admission to and deportation from the United States as well as the politics and policies related to the societal integration and exclusion of immigrants residing in the United States.

Prerequisite: POL 1101

POL 3321 Urban Politics
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

Survey of important approaches to the study of urban political systems. The course concentrates on the nature of cities, their contemporary problems, and the political structures and processes used to solve these problems.

Prerequisite: ENG 2100 or equivalent, and one of the following: POL 1101; POL 2220; POL 2353; PAF 1250; or departmental permission.

POL 3323 Politics and Government of New York City
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This course analyzes the politics and government of New York City, including city-state relations; the role of the city in the region, the nation, and the world; the municipal government's institutions and procedures; and the city's evolving political culture.

Prerequisite: ENG 2100 or equivalent, and one of the following: POL 1101, 2321, 2332, or 2353.

POL 3333 Political Behavior
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

An investigation of psychological and sociological factors influencing individual and group political behavior by leaders and non-leaders.

Prerequisite: ENG 2100 or its equivalent.

POL 3334 American Radicalism
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This course examines leading themes in American radicalism, placing them in a historical and comparative context and considering their policy implications.

Prerequisite: POL 1101 or departmental permission.

POL 3335 Early Political Theory
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

A study of the principal political philosophers from ancient Greece to the Renaissance. Major political philosophers are examined in relation to the historical and institutional developments in their own time and for the understanding they provide of the traditions at work in twenty-first-century politics.

Prerequisite: ENG 2100 or its equivalent.

POL 3336 Modern Political Theory
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

A study of the major political philosophers of the modern Western world, from the seventeenth century to the present, including Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Hegel, Marx, Bentham, J.S. Mill, and Freud. Attention is devoted to the historical and institutional environments within which these theorists worked and the understanding they provide of the problems of contemporary politics.

Prerequisite: ENG 2100 or its equivalent.

POL 3337 Contemporary Political Ideologies
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

The course focuses on major systems of political ideas that are fundamental to the politics of the twentieth century. Topics include the nature of ideology, classical and welfare state liberalism, conservatism, Marxism, socialism, fascism, liberation ideologies, and environmentalism. Prospects for the future of ideological discourse will be analyzed.

Prerequisite: ENG 2100 or its equivalent.

POL 3340 Political Socialization
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

A survey of research and theory on the process by which individuals become members of their political system and learn about its fundamental values, beliefs, and symbols.

Prerequisite: one course in political science.

POL 3341 International Relations in the Middle East
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

An application of the theories of international relations to the history of great power and regional rivalries in the Middle East. The course will analyze international conflicts, particularly between Israel and the Arab states, Turkey and Greece, and Iran and Saudi Arabia.

Prerequisite: ENG 2100 and one course in political science.

POL 3342 American Foreign Policy
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

A study of how American foreign policy is formulated and implemented. Includes a consideration of the influence of the military-industrial complex and the media upon foreign policy. Also includes a discussion of training for foreign service.

Prerequisite: POL 1101 or departmental permission.

POL 3343 International Relations in Selected Areas of the World
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

The application of concepts developed in the introductory course to the foreign policy and interrelations of nations in selected areas of the world. The group of nations to be considered is identified as a part of the course title as the time the course is scheduled, e.g., European powers. The course may be repeated with new content.

Prerequisite: POL 2240 or departmental permission.

POL 3344 The United Nations in World Politics
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This course examines the United Nations, its history, structure, specialized agencies, and its roles in peace keeping, human rights, and economic development. Students will also participate in a Model UN, in which the class will represent a designated state.

Prerequisite: POL 2240 or departmental permission.

POL 3345 Contemporary International Conflict
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

An analysis of the source and structure of conflict among states in the world, the means of coping with and resolving conflicts, and trends in the world politics.

Prerequisite: POL 1101 or departmental permission.

POL 3346 The Rise of Asia in World Affairs
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This course presents the cultures, recent histories, and current conditions of the Asian countries in the context of global politics and economics. Through an examination of economic growth in the context of the world economy and political developments both within countries and among them, the course will provide a basis for understanding the Asian region in contemporary affairs.

This course is equivalent to AAS 3346 and HIS 3346. Students will receive credit for either POL 3346, AAS 3346, or HIS 3346. These courses may not substitute for each other in the F grade replacement policy.

Prerequisite: One of the following: POL 1101, 2101, 2240, or 2260 or HIS/AAS 3080.

POL 3346H Hon The Rise of Asia in World Affairs
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This course presents the cultures, recent histories, and current conditions of the Asian countries in the context of global politics and economics. Through an examination of economic growth in the context of the world economy and political developments both within countries and among them, the course will provide a basis for understanding the Asian region in contemporary affairs.

This course is equivalent to AAS 3346 and HIS 3346. Students will receive credit for POL 3346, AAS 3346, or HIS 3346. These courses may not substitute for each other in the F grade replacement policy.

Prerequisite: One of the following: POL 1101, 2101, 2240, or 2260 or HIS/AAS 3080.

POL 3347 Seminar on Political Globalization
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

The goal of this course is to introduce and critically discuss questions, processes, and ideas that are central to the study of political globalization – defined as the process or set of processes through which policy-making responsibilities have increasingly shifted from national governments to both sub-national and supranational institutions. Due to transnational movements of people, goods, capitals, information, and ideas, state borders have become increasingly permeable, and politics no longer takes place simply in and through the state but beyond its confines and through new political actors. In this course, we will introduce the concepts of global and multi-level governance, and examine the impact of intergovernmental organizations, international institutions, and non-governmental organizations both on state sovereignty and national policy-making. We will also analyze globalization in relation to political identity by discussing the idea of global citizenship and cosmopolitanism, and the resurgence of nationalism as a form of resistance to globalization. Finally, we will devote some time to the discussion of regional integration. Is regionalism an antidote against globalization or are the two processes interlinked and mutually reinforcing? In order to answer such a question, we will study the nature and the significance of the European Union as the most advanced case of regional integration.

Prerequisite: ENG 2150

POL 3361 Comparative Politics in Selected Areas of the World
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

The application of concepts developed in POL 2260 to governmental structures and processes in selected groups of countries, e.g., the underdeveloped countries.

Prerequisite: POL 2260 or departmental permission.

POL 3362 European Political Systems
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

Analysis of politics in representative parliamentary democracies in Europe. Special attention is given to the mechanics of parliamentary systems and how they illustrate contemporary theories of democracy.

Prerequisite: One course in political science.

POL 3364 Latin American and Caribbean Political Systems
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This course examines contemporary political systems in selected Latin American and Caribbean countries. It emphasizes the common problems of state-building, political-economic development, political party development, political instability, revolution, dictatorship, and democracy in these nations. Special attention is paid to the current and historical relations between these countries and the United States and other nations in the hemisphere.

Prerequisite: One course in political science.

POL 3365 Asian Political Systems
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

Analysis of politics in Asia, with special emphasis on its most populous nations: China, India, Indonesia, and Japan. Nations are analyzed in terms of political culture, governmental structure, interest groups, and political parties.

Prerequisite: One course in political science.

POL 3366 African Political Systems
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

An examination of contemporary political systems in selected African nations, emphasizing cultural environment, colonial legacies, problems of development and modernization, and intergovernmental relations.

Prerequisite: One course in political science.

POL 3367 Comparative Revolutions
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

A course examining general theories of how, when, and why revolutions occur. These theories are tested against various revolutions that have occurred since the seventeenth century in Europe, America, and Asia.

This course is cross-listed as HIS 3367. Students will receive credit for either POL 3367 or HIS 3367, not both.

Prerequisite: POL 2260; HIS 1002, 1003, or 1004; or departmental permission.

POL 3368 Communist Political Systems
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This course presents an analysis of politics in communist countries compared with communist party politics in noncommunist countries.

Prerequisite: One course in political science.

POL 3417 Case Studies in American Government
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

A series of case studies illustrating selected major problems that exist in the government and administration of the United States.

Prerequisite: POL 1101 or departmental permission.

POL 3422 Urban Public Policy
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This course examines the public policy process and policy outcomes in the urban context. Current social science approaches, including games and simulation, may be employed to elucidate the policy process (formulation, initiation, implementation, and evaluation). The policy areas examined are drawn from the following: urban crime and justice, welfare and equality, housing, education, transportation, and the federal role in urban policy. Case studies are drawn from a variety of urban areas.

Prerequisite: POL 1101, 2220, 2321, 2353, or 3323; ECO 2500; HIS 3472 or 3551; SOC 3051; or departmental permission.

POL 3456 American Intellectual History
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This course will expose students to important American intellectual movements from the Puritans to contemporary political, social, and cultural commentators. The focus of the topics may shift but will certainly include these important cultural and political issues: relations between the individual and the state, debates over economic and social systems, discussions of religion and science, and various ideological positions in American society.

This course is equivalent to HIS 3456. Students may receive credit for either POL 3456 or HIS 3456. These courses may not substitute for each other in the F grade replacement policy.

Prerequisite: ENG 2150 or equivalent and one course in history, preferably HIS 1004 or 1005.

POL 3500 Political Analysis
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

An introductory course in political data analysis. Students work with data made available through the Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR) in conjunction with an appropriate computer package. Examples are drawn from such areas as election studies, public opinion, political socialization, and political behavior.

Prerequisite: ENG 2100 or equivalent.

POL 3842 The Making of Modern India
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This course is designed to explore the dynamics of British colonialism and the making of the contemporary Indian nation-state (seventeenth to twenty-first century). It will examine the role of the entrepreneurs of the English East India Company in pioneering the building of an empire and the numerous strategies and institutions that sustained British power in the subcontinent for more than two centuries. The profound transformation of the economy and society and forms of collaboration and resistance generated by the British Raj will be charted, along with the formation of Hindu and Muslim political identities and the eventual emergence of India as a modern democracy and Pakistan as an Islamic dictatorship. The readings for this course include original sources and interpretive writings by Indian and Western scholars, novels, and films.

The course is cross-listed as AAS 3842 and HIS 3842. Students may receive credit for POL 3842, AAS 3842, or HIS 3842.

Prerequisite: One course in political science or history and ENG 2150 or permission of the instructor.

POL 3999 Special Topics in Political Science
1.0 to 3.0 Hours; 1.0 to 3.0 Credits

This course provides an opportunity to study aspects of Political Science not covered in other Political Science courses. Class topics will vary from semester to semester on the basis of instructor expertise. Students may enroll in this course multiple times if the topic is different, and the course can count multiple times toward fulfilling Political Science major and minor requirements. The course will not count toward fulfilling any of the particular subfield requirements of the major, unless explicitly approved by the chair as counting towards a specific subfield.

Prerequisite:ENG 2100 or its equivalent and one course in POL, SOC, HIS, BLS, or LTS

POL 3999H Hon Special Topics in Political Science
1.0 to 3.0 Hours; 1.0 to 3.0 Credits

This course provides an opportunity to study aspects of Political Science not covered in other Political Science courses. Class topics will vary from semester to semester on the basis of instructor expertise. Students may enroll in this course multiple times if the topic is different, and the course can count multiple times toward fulfilling Political Science major and minor requirements. The course will not count toward fulfilling any of the particular subfield requirements of the major, unless explicitly approved by the chair as counting towards a specific subfield. Credit for this course will be variable - 1 credit, 2 credits, or 3 credits.

Prerequisite:ENG 2100 or its equivalent and one course in POL, SOC, HIS, BLS, or LTS

POL 4900 Political Science Capstone Seminar
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This course is designed to enable students to develop a sophisticated understanding of the concepts and theories employed in political science. The seminar combines extensive reading, in-depth research, oral student presentations, and intensive class discussion. Topics will be drawn from one of the following areas: American politics, urban politics, political theory, public policy, comparative politics, or international politics. Students will prepare class presentations and a substantial research paper as part of the course requirements.(POL 4900 may be repeated once for credit as an area elective within the major, provided the two courses cover different topics.)

Prerequisite: Two courses in political science at the 3000 level.

POL 5000 Ind Stud Pol I
Hours and credits to be arranged

Students interested in this course should see a department advisor.

POL 5001 Ind Stud Pol II
Hours and credits to be arranged

Students interested in this course should see a department advisor.

POL 5002
Hours and credits to be arranged

Students interested in this course should see a department advisor.

POL 5030-5031 Research Practicums in Political Science
credits 1.0 - 3.0, hours 3.0 -9.0

This course provides students with hands-on experience in political science research. Students work under the direct supervision of a single full-time faculty member. They participate in a variety of research activities pertaining to the collection and analysis of data and learn about emerging issues in specific areas of political science research. This is a course graded on a pass/fail basis. Students may take a total of up to 6 credits over two semesters, although completion of the two-semester sequence is not required and only one of the two courses may be taken each semester. A total of three, and only three, credits can be applied toward the Political Science major. The course cannot count as an elective course for the Political Science minor.

POL 1101, at least one 2000 or 3000-level POL course, instructor permission, and departmental approval

POL 5452 Field Work in Government and Politics
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

The student interested in a government career is afforded the opportunity to work under supervision in a public agency or political institution. The course is designed primarily to bridge the gap between the classroom and actual employment. Each student serves as an intern in a federal, state, or municipal agency appropriate to his or her major field of study.

May be repeated once for credit as an outside elective. Before registering, students must obtain the permission of the specialization advisor and the faculty member in charge of placement. This course is cross-listed as PUB 5452. Students may receive credit for either POL 5452 or PUB 5452, not both. In order to receive credit for PUB 5452, students must fulfill that department's prerequisites.

Prerequisite: POL 1101 and one of the following: POL 2220, 2321, 3312, 3323, or 3422; ECO 2500; HIS 3472 or 3551; SOC 3051; or departmental permission.

POL 6001H Hon Pol Sci I
Prerequisite: A minimum of four courses in Political Science, with at least two at the 3000 level or above. Open only to students who have earned at least 3.5 GPA in Political Science and also have a 3.5 cumulative GPA and who have submitted a written proposal that has been approved by the prospective mentor, the Chair of Political Science, and the Chair of the Committee on Undergraduate Honors.

This project involves in-depth and original research of an empirical and/or theoretical question in the field. The degree with honors is conferred upon acceptance of the honors project by the Committee on Undergraduate Honors.

The six credits earned from completing a thesis will be accepted as part of the 24 credit major.

Prerequisite: A minimum of four courses in Political Science, with at least two at the 3000 level or above. Open only to students who have earned at least 3.5 GPA in Political Science and also have a 3.5 cumulative GPA and who have submitted a written proposal that has been approved by the prospective mentor, the Chair of Political Science, and the Chair of the Committee on Undergraduate Honors.

POL 6002H Hon Pol Sci II
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits per semester

This project involves in-depth and original research of an empirical and/or theoretical question in the field. The degree with honors is conferred upon acceptance of the honors project by the Committee on Undergraduate Honors.

The six credits earned from completing a thesis will be accepted as part of the 24 credit major.

Prerequisite: A minimum of four courses in Political Science, with at least two at the 3000 level or above. Open only to students who have earned at least 3.5 GPA in Political Science and also have a 3.5 cumulative GPA and who have submitted a written proposal that has been approved by the prospective mentor, the Chair of Political Science, and the Chair of the Committee on Undergraduate Honors.