Course Description Detail Page

PAF 1250 Citizenship and Public Affairs
3.0 Hours, 3.0 Credits

The course is an examination of the historical, institutional, political, and social context of civic life in the United States. The place of the individual in a democratic society is explored. The course will examine government structures and how businesses and advocacy groups interact with public officials. Constitutional principles are identified and applied to civil liberties, civil rights, and property rights.

Baruch Common Core (for students who entered Baruch prior to Fall 2013): This course satisfies the Tier II Politics and Government requirement.

CUNY Pathways at Baruch (for students who entered Baruch Fall 2013 or later, or who “opt-in” to CUNY Pathways): This course satisfies the “U.S. Experience in its Diversity” requirement of the Flexible Core.

(This course was previously PUB 1250, and students may receive credit for only one of the courses.)

Prerequisite: None

PAF 3005 Public Service in New York City
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

Events, personalities, and popular culture have shaped public service in New York City. This course examines the impacts of events such as the Draft Riots and 9/11, the influences of prominent mayors and administrators, and the effects of New York-focused movies, music, and television shows. It identifies models of public service to emulate.

Prerequisite: ENG 2150

PAF 3010 Policy and Politics
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

The class provides an overview of the politics of the policy process. A summary is provided of a wide range of public problems and solutions. The class considers the influence of government institutions and advocacy groups in the policy process. The course examines the creation of political coalitions and public-private partnerships.

Prerequisite: ENG 2150

PAF 3015 Qualitative Studies of Communities
3.0 Hours, 3.0 Credits

Whether defined by geography, religious or political ideals, or socioeconomic, circumstance, communities are a central building block of American public life and public affairs. This class will equip students with the tools to study various communities with qualitative methods such as participant-observation, intensive interviewing, and content analysis.

Prerequisite :ENG 2150

PAF 3020 Ethics and Civic Engagement
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

The course identifies the nature of ethical problems faced by citizens and those entrusted with the public interest. It explores alternative forms of ethical analysis. Students will have the opportunity to apply these analytic frames to specific problems related to public policy.

Prerequisite: ENG 2150

PAF 3040 Information and Society
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This course surveys the nature, production, values, and uses of information in historical perspective; the latest developments in information technology; the ways information is produced and disseminated, and how they affect business, politics, media, science, arts, and culture; the growth of the ?information society?; and major information policy issues in contemporary society.

Cross-listed with COM 3040 and LIB 3040.

Prerequisite: ENG 2100

PAF 3100 Nonprofit Administration
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

The purpose of the course is to provide an understanding of the nature and function of management in nonprofit organizations. Emphasis is placed on the processes of defining goals and objectives, organizing and staffing for maximum productivity, and dealing with the important aspects of the nonprofit environment.

Prerequisite: ENG 2150

PAF 3101 Public Finance / Managing Public Resources
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This course examines the role and economic impact of government intervention in the market. The core consists of an examination of how government obtains and spends revenue. The primary objective is to help students develop a critical perspective on current debates over the proper role of the public sector in the economy. Using economic theory, it examines the functions of government, interests served by government, and the process that determines what government does.

Prerequisite: PUB 1250, ECO 1001, PAF 3102, and pre-public affairs core or pre-business core or pre-arts and sciences core.

PAF 3102 Economic Analysis of Public Policy
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This is a course in economic theory and its use for understanding and addressing public problems. Applications are drawn from current policy debates in areas such as the environment, health, and labor markets. Relevant analytical tools, including benefit-cost analysis, are introduced. Students analyze and write from an economic perspective through in-class activities and out-of-class assignments.

Prerequisite: ECO 1001 and ENG 2150

PAF 3103 Economics of the Public Sector
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

The focus of this course is on the role of the government in the economy. It addresses the reasons for and consequences of government intervention, including the theoretical and empirical examination of whether and when intervention improves economic efficiency and social welfare. Students will learn about and analyze education and environmental policies, social insurance programs such as Social Security, social welfare, income and property taxation, and other means of financing government activities.

Prerequisite: PAF 3102

PAF 3105 Principles of Survey Research
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

The course explores the history and fundamentals of survey research, including the survey research process and its uses by government, business, nonprofits, and the media. Different methodologies are covered, including telephone and web surveys. It reviews how to evaluate questionnaires, put research findings to use, and get hands-on experience designing, executing, and analyzing an online survey.

Prerequisite : ENG 2150

PAF 3106 Public Opinion Polling
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This course is an examination of public opinion in the American constitutional and political framework. The emphasis is on the public’s capacity for expressing its political views, the place of attitudinal research in the social sciences, and the uses of opinion polls in public, nonprofit, and private decisionmaking. The class will learn about the role of public opinion in the advocacy and analysis of public policy.

Prerequisite: ENG 2150

PAF 3108 Public Campaigns and Advocacy
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

Students will create and manage persuasive campaigns for a range of public causes. The course focuses on theories of persuasion and social influence, and classic media campaigns such as public service announcements against drunk driving and ads for political candidates. Through such studies, class members will learn how to apply persuasion principles and advocacy strategies to influence diverse audiences in contemporary contexts involving issue advertising, election drives, cultural activism, new media, and movement communication.

Prerequisites or Co-requisite: ENG 2150

PAF 3201 Public Communication and Organizations
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

Students are taught in this course to understand and apply communication skills in public affairs. The class provides cutting-edge tools for deliberation and speech in organizational environments, focusing on: professional styles and habits, audience analysis, institutional adaptation, political argument, rhetoric, media training, and the innovative use of technologies. New perspectives and practical skills will be acquired for engaging public issues.

Prerequisite: ENG 2150

PAF 3301 Models of Service Delivery
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

The principles and problems of delivering urban services and the design of alternative service delivery systems are introduced in this class. The particular focus is on how well government serves the public, what kind of information is needed to answer questions about the effectiveness, efficiency, equity, and quality of services, and how to make service delivery more responsive to the public.

Prerequisite : ENG 2150

PAF 3342 Cities and Sustainability
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

An analysis of ongoing and current public policies and programs that affect the greening of cities. The focus is on the historical evolution of land uses in New York City and the environmental sustainability of its neighborhoods and economy.

Prerequiste: ENG 2150

PAF 3343 Building Cities: Markets and Government
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This course introduces the major concepts behind the public regulation of urban land use. The course examines how market forces and the public sector shape every aspect of urban development, through policies, plans, regulations, and investment. It considers the tension between the market and government regulation. Students will learn how to analyze a community's land use structure and assess its strengths and weaknesses in order to develop policies that improve public welfare.

Prerequisite : ENG 2150

PAF 3375 Housing and Community Development Policy
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

Examines the housing and community development system and its problems, including neighborhood change. Traces the evolution of government programs and policy-making with a focus on New York City. Housing needs, homelessness and community reinvestment issues are considered. Case studies of housing revitalization and neighborhood redevelopment accompany course readings and lectures.

Prerequisite: ENG 2150

PAF 3401 Quantitative Methods for Policy and Practice
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This course focuses on the use of quantitative information and analysis to understand, interpret, promote, critique, and inform the implementation of programs and policies. Real world cases are examined throughout. A statistical software package will be employed to analyze selec ted data using various methods, such as simple regression.

Prerequisite:ENG 2150 and either STA 2000 or PSY 2100 (equivalent to STA 2100)

PAF 3402 Policy Analysis
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This course examines the arguments and analysis used to identify problems, develop policy solutions, and make decisions in the public and nonprofit sectors. Students consider the range of policy goals, alternative policy approaches, and various analytic methods for determining the impacts of policy proposals and for making recommendations.

Prerequisite: ENG 2150

PAF 3403 Advanced Quantitative Analysis
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This course expands students’ ability to understand, apply and produce quantitative analysis in aid of policy and practice. Real world cases are examined throughout, with an emphasis on developing and applying critical thinking skills. Students use Excel and a statistical software package to analyze data with various methods, such as multiple regression.

Prerequisite: PAF 3401

PAF 3442 Cities and Sustainability
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

An analysis of ongoing and current public policies and programs that affect the greening of cities. The focus is on the historical evolution of land uses in New York City and the environmental sustainability of its neighborhoods and economy.

Prerequisite: ENG 2150

PAF 3451H Hon Sel Top in Paf
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

Topics will vary from offering to offering. Topics offered will provide an application of concepts developed in the introductory courses. This honors course is open only to students in an official honors program and to other qualified students with a minimum 3.4 overall GPA. This is the same course as POL 3451/3451H. Students will receive credit for PAF 3451 or POL 3451, not both. (Not open to students who have completed pub 3451.)

Prerequisites: PUB 1250 or HIS 1005 or POL 1101.

PAF 3501 Advanced Statistical Analysis for Public Policy and Management
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

Introduces students to advanced statistical methods used in policy analysis, program evaluation, and quantitative management. Building on the basic regression model, the course extends students' understanding of the application of regression analysis and time series analysis to policy and management data. Topics include multiple regression, regression with dummy variables, nonlinear relationships, time series analysis, interrupted time series analysis, and path analysis. Emphasis on students' ability to build and test their own models using real-world policy and management data and to critically interpret the models of others.

Prerequisite: PUB 1250 or POL 1101, 2001, 2321, 2332, 2353 and pre-public affairs core or pre-business core.

PAF 3550 Analytical Skills in Real Estate
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This course exposes students to two major aspects of real estate analysis. The first is an understanding of key concepts that are needed to conduct commercial real estate analysis, including issues of policy and financial feasibility and the appreciation of the key issues of risk assessment and present value. The second major component of this course is an understanding of the use of major quantitative analysis tools, including the ability to perform basic calculations. The course makes use of standard spreadsheet software to facilitate the understanding and calculation of the value of an investment. The class includes real data examples as well as computer laboratory assignments. This course offers students a grounding in analytic and quantitative techniques of real estate financial analysis.

RES 3550 is crosslisted with PAF 3550. Credits will not be granted for both PAF 3550 and RES 3550. Students may take only one of these courses.

Prerequisite: FIN 3000.

PAF 3710 Reforming Education
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This course examines the history and politics of American school reform. Students will consider the competing purposes often ascribed to public schools and study educational policies at local, state, and federal levels. Particular attention will be paid to urban education and issues of race and class.

Prerequisites or Co-requisite: ENG 2150

PAF 3801 Real Estate Construction, Planning and Execution
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

Presents the process of designing and building residential and commercial structures within the New York context. The course includes a focus on design, costing, construction site management, building code and clearance issues, and issues leading to the certificate of occupancy. The course will include case examples from the New York area.

This course is cross listed with RES 3800. Credits will not be granted for both PAF 3801 and RES 3800. Students may take only one of these courses.

Prerequisite: PUB 1250, FIN 300 and pre-public affairs core or pre-business core or pre-arts and sciences core courses

PAF 3810 Arts and Public Life
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

Students will explore how art and arts organizations function in the political, economic, and cultural context of the United States. Through a variety of innovative learning experiences, including field work at museums and other venues, students will grapple with the challenges of leading, funding, and promoting art in public life.

Prerequisites or Co-requisite: ENG 2150

PAF 4199 Selected Topics
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

Issues of special interest will be examined. The subject matter is determined by instructor.

Prerequisite: ENG 2150

PAF 4199H Hon Spec Top in PAF
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

Issues of special interest will be examined. The subject matter is determined by instructor.

Prerequisite: ENG 2150

PAF 4401 Capstone
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

Students will apply advocacy and analysis concepts and skills learned as Public Affairs majors to produce a project or paper on a policy solution or topic of interest.

Prerequisite: 18 PAF credits

PAF 4402 Survey Research Practicum
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

Combining the knowledge and methods learned in prior classes with hands-on interviewing experience in the telephone/CATI lab, the course will give students the opportunity to conduct their own survey research project. The class will design, administer, analyze, and present the results of a survey.

Prerequisite or Corequisite: PAF 3105 and PAF 3106

PAF 4701 Real Estate Development: Principles and Guidelines
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This semester-long course includes a broad survey and overview of real estate as development processes, as markets, and in terms of investment options and development choices. Market and financial feasibility issues are assessed, as they are critical for real estate development projects. The course includes an examination of development trends in the New York region as they affect real estate development options and decisions. Central to the course will be case studies of actual development projects and decisions including meetings with key stakeholders to review and understand their choices, costs, and decisions. The course focuses the students upon the stages of real estate development in residential and nonresidential real estate.

This course is cross listed with RES 3900. Credits will not be granted for both PAF 4701 and RES 3900. Students may take only one of these courses.

Prerequisite: at least three PAF courses at the 3000-level or above that are required for the B.S. in Real Estate and Metropolitan Development, and three REA or real estate LAW courses; or department permission.

PAF 4702 Real Estate Development: Case Development
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This semester long course is an analysis of real estate development from the perspective of investors and developers. It includes a case specific development proposal that each student prepares as their final capstone project. These real estate development proposals based upon real development prices are then presented to a panel of outside development professionals as part of the final class project.

This course is cross listed with RES 4900. Credits will not be granted for both PAF 4702 and RES 4900. Students may take only one of these courses.

Prerequisite: At least three real estate courses in real estate and metropolitan development, PAF 4701 or RES 3900, or departmental permission.

PAF 5000 Independent Study
Hours and credits to be arranged

This course is an individualized course of study under the direction of a professor. By application only.

Prerequisite: ENG 2150

PAF 5001 New York State Legislature Internship
Hours to be Arranged; 15 credits,

This course introduces students to lawmaking and constituent services. Each intern is assigned to an elected member of the New York State Senate or Assembly. Students must reside in Albany for a full semester, attend classes taught by professors-in-residence, prepare a research paper, contribute to policy forums, and participate in a mock legislative session. By application only.

Prerequisite: ENG 2150

PAF 5452 Public Affairs Internship
Hours to be Arranged; 3.0 Credits

This course requires students to work in an approved public or nonprofit organization. It bridges the gap between theory and practice. By application only.

Prerequisite: ENG 2150

PAF 5453 Public Affairs Internship in Nonprofit Agencies
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This course is a bridge between academia and the professional nonprofit world, supporting and supplementing students in non-profit internships. It is an active student-centered learning experience that prepares professionals in nonprofit. This experience affords students the opportunity to demonstrate the skills and knowledge they have acquired during the formal academic process and to gain professional skills that will enhance their employability. The nonprofit organization benefits from the student's expertise and abilities and the student benefits from exposure to a real world laboratory that allows her/him to apply theoretical knowledge and gain practical experience.

This course meets the requirement for American Humanics Nonprofit Leadership Certificate Program.

Prerequisite or Corequisite: Two public affairs (PAF) or public administration (PUB) courses; pre-public affairs core or pre-business core; and permission of the Office of Student Services in the School of Public Affairs.

PAF 6001H Hon Thesis
3.0 Credit 3.0 Hours

The honors thesis is a major research project accomplished under the direction of a professor.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum of 18 credits in public affairs at the 3000 level or above. Open only to students who have earned at least a 3.5 GPA in public affairs and a 3.5 cumulative GPA and who have submitted an application prior to the fall semester of their senior year that has been approved by the prospective mentor, the associate dean of the School of Public Affairs, and the chair of the Committee on Undergraduate Honors.

PAF 6002H Hon Thesis
3.0 Credit 3.0 Hours

The honors thesis is a major research project accomplished under the direction of a professor.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum of 18 credits in public affairs at the 3000 level or above. Open only to students who have earned at least a 3.5 GPA in public affairs and a 3.5 cumulative GPA and who have submitted an application prior to the fall semester of their senior year that has been approved by the prospective mentor, the associate dean of the School of Public Affairs, and the chair of the Committee on Undergraduate Honors.

PAF 9100 Introduction to Public Affairs
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

The course is an introduction to politics, government, and public policy in the U.S. It provides a rigorous, scholarly, yet practical view of governmental institutions, policy making, administration, and contemporary public policy. Attention is given to the role of governmental and nongovernmental actors, as well as the influence of history, culture, public opinion, and political economy. Students develop skills in thinking critically and writing clearly about issues of public importance.

Prerequisite: none

PAF 9103 Communication in Public Settings
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

Introduces students to communication in public settings and provides extensive opportunities for practice with basic written and oral forms. Interrelationships among communicative activities and organizational goals. Internal and external messages are given equal weight. Argumentative structures necessary for constructing sound policy and persuasive techniques relevant to funding, regulation, client, and public constituencies. Topics will vary somewhat from semester to semester depending on the instructor's and students' interests. The course follows a workshop/laboratory format with intensive attention to student work as a fulcrum for the application of theory and refinement of skills.

Prerequisite: none

PAF 9104 Media, Politics, and Public Culture
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This course identifies how the media advances or limits democratic values. Students will examine how policy leaders work with media systems to influence public opinion, and the domestic and global policies that shape media diversity. The course also covers the ways individuals and groups monitor, preserve, or challenge the power of the media. Open to Austin W. Marxe School of Public and International Affairs students; others with Marxe School permission.

Prerequisites or Co-requisite: None

PAF 9109 Government Contracting
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This course reviews the principles and practices of government contracting and analysis of the major types of government contracts. Administration and management problems of the government procurement function are identified and analyzed. Major policy questions, including societal implications of large-scale government contracting, are explored. Open to Austin W. Marxe School of Public and International Affairs students; others with Marxe School permission.

Prerequisite: none

PAF 9110 Ethics and Public Decision Making
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This course concerns the relationship of ethics and public service. Those in public service face a broad array of ethical problems and dilemmas ranging from simple matters of public trust through the application of ethical reasoning in policymaking. The course examines the limits of self-interest in public service, the differing ethical concerns of elective and appointive officials, the conflict between responsibility to hierarchical authority and personal conceptions of the right, bureaucratic responsibility for the ethical content of public policies, and the possibility of necessary evil. A significant portion of this course focuses on ethical theories that may help resolve these dilemmas.

Prerequisite: none

PAF 9111 American Public Law and the Administrative State
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

Introduction to the American legal system and its role in the development and control of the modern administrative state. The course also emphasizes the legal context within which public and nonprofit agencies operate.

Prerequisite: none

PAF 9115 Intergovernmental Relations
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This course focuses on the vertical and horizontal relations among American governmental jurisdictions. It examines the theory and history of American federalism and its emergence into an intergovernmental system. The emphasis is on the changing nature of constitutional, fiscal, and non-fiscal relationships. Open to Austin W. Marxe School of Public and International Affairs students; others with Marxe School permission.

Prerequisite: none

PAF 9117 Public Personnel and Human Resource Management
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

Analysis of problems and issues dealing with public sector personnel. Topics covered include selection, training, employee evaluation, and promotion policies and practices. Managerial, legal, and political aspects of human resource management are also considered.

Prerequisite: none

PAF 9118 Labor Relations in the Public Sector
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

Development and growth of public employee unionism. Topics covered include collective bargaining laws and procedures, government organization of labor relations, the dynamics of the bargaining process, the impact of collective bargaining on civil service systems, and current trends in public sector collective bargaining.

Prerequisite: none

PAF 9119 Organization Theory
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This course is about the study and application of theories of organization, with special emphasis on public organizations. The topics include bureaucracy and the nature of organizations, organization environment, interface, organization goals, authority and power in organizations, communications, participation, and problems of alienation. Open to Austin W. Marxe School of Public and International Affairs students; others with Marxe School permission.

Prerequisite: none

PAF 9120 Public and Nonprofit Management I
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This course introduces the fundamental concepts and techniques for managing government and nonprofit organizations. It focuses on structural models; individual behavior, including group dynamics and leadership; effective use and management of human resources; and political and cultural frameworks. It considers questions of effectiveness, responsibility, and professional relations. Open to Austin W. Marxe School of Public and International Affairs students; others with Marxe School permission. Not open to students who have completed PAF 9302, PAF 9309, MGT 9300, or PSY 9788

Prerequisite: None

PAF 9125 Human Resources Policy
3.0 hours; 3.0 credits

Analysis of government policies aimed at altering income levels and life opportunities of individuals. Issues are chosen from the human services area (e.g., education, disability programs, employment and training).

Prerequisite: Grad 8 status in MPA program or permission of the Office of Student Affairs and Graduate Admissions of the School of Public Affairs.

PAF 9126 Human Services Administration
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

Examination of management approaches and perspectives relevant to client-centered, public and nonprofit organizations (e.g., social services, health care services, employment and training programs, corrections). Special attention is given to administrative structures, institutional perspectives, needs assessment, program management, and the integration of human services.

Prerequisite: None

PAF 9127 Managing Cultural Diversity in the Workplace
Credits 3.0; Hours 3.0

Managing Cultural Diversity in the Workplace explores selected problems and opportunities organizational leaders encounter as they lead, interact with and make decisions about employees from diverse cultural backgrounds. The course interrogates the rhetoric of understanding and valuing workplace diversity and explores why it has become such an important managerial imperative in the United States and abroad.

Prerequisites: None

PAF 9129 Animal Rights and Welfare
Credits 3.0, Hours 3.0

The course will look at public policy in its application to other species. It will focus on the assumptions behind those policies, inconsistencies in the values represented, and the lessons learned about ourselves from considering the perspective of other animals. It will also consider how climate change might impact our understanding of the rights and welfare of other animals.

Pre/Co Requisites:None

PAF 9130 Economic Analysis and Public Policy
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This course is an introduction to the concepts and analytic tools necessary to analyze and understand the economic behavior of individuals and firms and the causes and consequences of public sector intervention in the economy. Open to Austin W. Marxe School of Public and International Affairs students; others with Marxe School permission. Not open to students who have completed ECO 9705, PAF 9415, and PAF 9760

Prerequisite: None

PAF 9132 Governing New York City
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

Examination of the structure and dynamics of New York City government, with special emphasis on the development and delivery of city services.

Prerequisite: none

PAF 9133 Economics of the Public Sector and Public Finance
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This course assesses the role of government in the modern economy. The course examines the reasons for government intervention in the economy, consequences of that intervention, and issues pertaining to the public financing of those interventions. An important part of this class is the study of public finance, tax incidence, and fiscal federalism. The course has two main goals: to build and refine skills of microeconomic policy analysis, and more important, to apply these skills to contemporary policy problems. Open to Austin W. Marxe School of Public and International Affairs students; others with Marxe School permission.

Prerequisite: PAF 9130 or PAF 9415

PAF 9136 Urban Economic Development
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This course introduces students to the major features of the field of urban economic development. The course reviews the principles by which economic activity is organized in an urban setting, focuses on methods of analyzing the existing economic structure of a community, and examines examples of successful business development, human resource development, community-based employment, and physical development programs.

Prerequisite: none

PAF 9137 Telecommunications Policy
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This course focuses on the communications industry and government regulation. It examines policy issues including growth of conglomerates, the impact of computers and the Internet, the scope and impact of the digital revolution, new technologies in wired and wireless transmission, allocating the spectrum, and the future of the electronic highway.

Prerequisite: none

PAF 9138 Urban Services Delivery
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

Review of the principles and problems in the design and evaluation of urban service delivery. Service areas covered include fire services, police services, health care and social services, waste disposal services, and justice system services.

Prerequisite: none

PAF 9139 Communication Strategy
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

In this class, students learn to design communication campaigns that will change or modify key behaviors; promote a cause, service, or program; or enhance the brand and fundraising capacity of an organization. Course topics will cover areas such as fear appeals, message fatigue, working with diverse audiences, and online and social media advocacy. Students will develop message strategies using techniques drawn from social marketing, persuasion, and political communication. Open to Austin W. Marxe School of Public and International Affairs students; others with Marxe School permission.

Prerequisite: PAF 9103 or PAF 9420

PAF 9140 Budgeting and Financial Analysis I
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This course focuses on the budget cycle and budget decision-making. It includes tools for developing, implementing, and controlling a budget within a, typically, public organization. Topics include development of operating budgets, cash budgets, break-even analysis, cost behavior, the time value of money, capital budgeting, long-term financing, and variance analysis. Basic budget accounting concepts are studied. The course includes development of spreadsheet skills for budgeting. Open to Austin W. Marxe School of Public and International Affairs students; others with Marxe School permission.

Prerequisite: None

PAF 9141 Community Development: History, Present, and Future
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

Community development is an approach to addressing poverty and its related social problems, such as poor-quality housing, unemployment, lack of education, and crime. Students will examine the complex economic, political, and social context that gave rise to the idea of community development, and then follow the successes and challenges in the field over its nearly fifty-year history.

Prerequisite: None

PAF 9142 Housing Policy
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

The course serves as a gateway to the field of housing and community development, giving students the background necessary to become informed participants in policy analysis and debates about the future of housing policy. Topics to be covered include: housing markets and policies; the evolution of federal, state, and local housing programs, with emphasis on low-income rental housing; as well as several longstanding and thorny housing policy topics.

Prerequisite: None

PAF 9143 Greening and Growing Cities: Sustainability and Public Policy Choices
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

The course focuses on the theory and practice of urban sustainability policies and programs. It addresses public policies as they helped shape the growth and uses of urban land within 20th and 21st century cities in the United States, within context of supporting or contesting long-term sustainable practices. The concentration will be on the historical evolution of land uses in New York as they affect the overall sustainability of its communities and economy.

Prerequisite: None

PAF 9144 Budget and Financial Analysis II
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This course extends Budget and Financial Analysis I by examining financial management of buildings, bridges, roads, and other long-term capital assets and liabilities of state and local governments, nonprofit institutions, and other public entities. It addresses why these assets merit special consideration, how they are financed, and how the capital markets operate. This course also examines pension funds, with specific attention paid to how these liabilities are calculated, how entities fund them, and their fiscal implications for an organization.

Prerequisites or Co-requisite: PAF 9140

PAF 9145 Poverty and Social Policy
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This is a course about the poor and anti - poverty programs in the United States. It focuses on measurement, extent, and distribution of poverty; causes of poverty; tradeoffs faced by policy -makers in reducing poverty and economic insecur ity; and the spatial concentration of poverty. It covers major social policies intended to reduce poverty and inequality, and the evidence on policy effectiveness.

Prerequisite: none

PAF 9150 Introduction to the Nonprofit Sector
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This course examines historical and contemporary perspectives on nonprofit organizations and the nonprofit sector in the United States. The course will emphasize the size, scope, and functions of the nonprofit sector as they have evolved, with particular emphasis on relations with the public and business sectors and current issues affecting the environment in which nonprofit organizations operate. Open to Austin W. Marxe School of Public and International Affairs students; others with Marxe School permission.

Prerequisite: none

PAF 9151 Administration of the Nonprofit Sector and Voluntary Agencies
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

In this class, students study management techniques and strategies applicable to nonprofit agencies. The topics include agency interaction with governmental and political institutions, planning and control systems, the role of the governing board, and the role of the executive director . The course pays special attention to the needs of community service/social welfare and cultural/arts organizations. Open to Austin W. Marxe School of Public and International Affairs students; others with Marxe School permission.

Prerequisite: none

PAF 9152 Fund Raising and Grants Administration in Nonprofit and Voluntary Organizations
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This course examines the strategies and techniques for acquiring voluntary and governmental support for local nonprofit agencies. The course focuses on the role that fundraising plays in the economics of the nonprofit organization and its relationship with government agencies, foundations, and other donor/granting institutions. Open to Austin W. Marxe School of Public and International Affairs students; others with Marxe School permission.

Prerequisite: none

PAF 9153 Budgeting and Finance for Nonprofits
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This course is for students whose career path is the nonprofit world and aspire to hold senior level positions in nonprofits. The course provides the tools for budgeting in a nonprofit, and the tools of financial analysis and managerial control. Open to Austin W. Marxe School of Public and International Affairs students; others with Marxe School permission.

Prerequisite: PAF 9140 or permission of instructor.

PAF 9156 Emergency Preparedness, Response and Recovery
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

The purpose of the course is to introduce students to policy, planning and management of human services issues that arise in preparing for and responding to disasters and emergencies that have broad effects on people, property, and communities. The course includes the role of both government and nonprofit organizations in responding to disasters and in providing services for relief and recovery. The course also addresses issues of readiness and planning by public and community organizations. Recent and historical events provide examples for students to examine and compare. Open to Austin W. Marxe School of Public and International Affairs students; others with Marxe School permission.

Prerequisite: None

PAF 9157 Introduction to Philanthropy
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This course considers the complex system of private giving that supports civil society, examining the ways in which private funds are given and the vehicles through which they are administered. It emphasizes the philanthropic motivations, strategic frameworks, and practices of individuals and institutions in the U.S. and other regions, as well as the public impact of these private activities. It also examines the current legal and regulatory framework within which philanthropy operates and emerging controversies about philanthropic institutions and activities. Open to Austin W. Marxe School of Public and International Affairs students; others with Marxe School permission.

Prerequisites or Co-requisite: PAF 9120, or PAF 9150, or PAF 9151

PAF 9158 Religion, Nonprofits, Politics, and Policy
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

Religious bodies are the largest component of the nonprofit sector in terms of numbers of organizations, giving, and volunteering, providing essential education, health, and human services. This course offers an overview of the role of religion in American public life, focusing its relationship to government, engagement in politics and policy, and provision of services.

Prerequisites: none

PAF 9159 Privatization and Market-Based Government
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

Market-based government, an important feature of The New Public Management, involves competition, privatization, public-private partnerships, competitive sourcing,, outsourcing, divestment, withdrawal, displacement, deregulation, citizen choice, vouchers, transferable permits, franchises, user charges, pricing strategies, voluntarism, and civil society-including faith-based institutions. Using a combination of theory, cases, and practice, the course prepares students to use these tools in the real world.

Prerequisite: none

PAF 9160 Public and Nonprofit Management II
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

Managing public agencies and nonprofit organizations. The course addresses concepts, strategies, and techniques for effectively planning, organizing, directing, and controlling agencies, programs, and projects. The objective of the course is to prepare students for practical managerial assignments in government and in the nonprofit sector.

Prerequisite: PAF 9120, PAF 9302, or PAF 9310

PAF 9161 Business and Public Policy
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

Analysis of the interrelations between business and governmental policy making. The focus is on the role played by business interests in specific policy arenas (e.g., defense, energy, trade) as well as the general policy environment.

Prerequisite:none

PAF 9163 Leadership and Strategy in Public Affairs
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

Leadership and Strategy in Public Affairs examines the personal, institutional and strategic circumstances that public (and nonprofit and business) leaders confront as they conduct their work. The course focuses on the exercise of leadership, particularly the development and execution of strategy, particularly within the context of politics and government. Students will explore the strategic calculi employed by leaders as they attempt to mobilize support, achieve personal influence, and exercise institutional authority to accomplish objectives.

Prerequisite: none

PAF 9170 Research and Analysis I
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

The first course in a two-course sequence (the second course is PAF 9172) that provides an introduction to research and analytical methods as applied to public policy and management. Students will develop expertise as consumers of research findings and learn methods for designing and conducting research. This first course provides an introduction to data analysis and statistical inference, with an emphasis on policy and management applications. Topics include graphing and numerical summaries, normal distributions, descriptive correlation and regression, basic probability and sampling distributions, confidence intervals, significance tests, chi-square tests, and inference for regression. Students learn these techniques through hands-on work with real data and statistical software. Open to Austin W. Marxe School of Public and International Affairs students; others with Marxe School permission. Not open to students who have received credit for PAF 9317.

Prerequisite: None

PAF 9171 Human Services Administration
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

Examination of management approaches and perspectives relevant to client-centered, public organizations (e.g., social services, health care services, employment and training programs, corrections). Special attention is given to administrative structures, institutional perspectives, needs assessment, program management, and the integration of human services.

Prerequisite: none

PAF 9172 Research and Analysis II
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

The second course in a two-course sequence (the first course is PAF 9170) that provides an introduction to research and analytical methods as applied to public policy and management. Students will develop expertise as consumers of research findings and learn basic methods for designing and conducting research. Topics include the use of theory or models, identifying causes, experiments and quasi-experiments, the logic of control variables and the interpretation of multiple regression, measurement concepts and methods, qualitative methods, and complex sampling. The emphasis is on learning these ideas through practice with many different examples of real-world research and empirical evidence. Open to Austin W. Marxe School of Public and International Affairs students; others with Marxe School permission.

Prerequisite: PAF 9170 or permission of instructor

PAF 9173 Program Auditing and Performance Measurement
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This course extends the student's knowledge of financially related decision-making techniques. It provides the student an understanding of management auditing, program auditing, and performance measurement. Key concepts include economy, efficiency, and effectiveness. From the retrospective perspective it examines how to determine whether a program has used its resources effectively and efficiently. From a concurrent perspective, it looks at what should be monitored and how. Prospectively it examines how to prepare an organization for performance measurement and auditing. From a holistic view it examines the decision to measure, monitor, and examine performance.

Prerequisite: None

PAF 9174 Program Evaluation
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

Examination of the process and techniques of program evaluation and the assessment of effectiveness of public sector policies. Various performance assessment criteria, problems of evaluation research, and the politics of program evaluation are reviewed.

Prerequisite: PAF 9170 and PAF 9172

PAF 9175 Advanced Analytical Methods
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

Advanced research methods and techniques utilized in public agencies for policy determination and administrative decision making. Course requirements include student projects and work exercises in the design and implementation of research studies and program evaluations.

Prerequisite: PAF 9170 and PAF 9172

PAF 9176 Public Policy and the Culture of Science
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

The course will review the impact on public policy of fundamental developments in science and mathematics that have challenged our assumptions of reality. We will examine the impact on our culture of evolution, quantum physics, relativity, chaos theory, and other radical departures from traditional perspectives on the human condition.

Prerequisite: none

PAF 9177 Advanced Quantitative Methods
Credits 3.0, hours 3.0

Intended for students interested in advanced quantitative research methods used in policy analysis, this course focuses on causal effects, especially of programs or policies. Topics include random assignment, multiple regression, instrumental variables, and difference-in-differences estimation. Students learn these approaches and techniques through hands-on projects and exercises on contemporary policy problems using real data and statistical software.

PAF 9170 and PAF 9172, or with permission of instructor

PAF 9180 Policy Analysis
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This course provides an overview of the use of analytic techniques in solving public sector problems and designing government programs. The topics include agenda setting, approaches to problem solving, the role of values in policy making and policy analysis, policy-relevant data collection and analysis, principles of benefit-cost analysis, techniques of policy analysis (e.g., queuing, simulations, formal modeling), strategies for policy adoption and implementation, and the politics of policy analysis. Open to Austin W. Marxe School of Public and International Affairs students; others with Marxe School permission.

Prerequisite: none

PAF 9181 Comparative Public Policy and Administration
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This course focuses on international variations in public affairs through a comparative analysis of the factors that drive policymaking and determine the configuration of the public and nonprofit sectors around the globe. It provides students with a basic toolbox of theories and methodologies needed to conduct comparative analyses of public policies and governance systems. Open to Austin W. Marxe School of Public and International Affairs students; others with Marxe School permission.

Prerequisite: none

PAF 9182 Development Administration
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

Introduction to the social, economic, political, and technological constraints, requisites, and institutions used in development programs both national and transnational. Open to Austin W. Marxe School of Public and International Affairs students; others with Marxe School permission

Prerequisite: none

PAF 9183 International Nonprofit Organizations
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This course examines the international dimension of the nonprofit world. It focuses on those nonprofit organizations that work across borders because: 1) they seek to influence global issues such as economic justice, human rights or the environment; 2) they deliver aid or capacity building programs in developing countries; or 3) they are the secretariat or headquarters of an international network of organizations. The course will explore international and cross-cultural management issues, relationships with national governments and supranational entities, and international advocacy strategies. Open to Austin W. Marxe School of Public and International Affairs students; others with Marxe School permission.

Prerequisites or Co-requisite: None

PAF 9184 International Institutions and Global Governance
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

In a world of globalization and glo bal threats—financial contagion, terrorism, proliferation, climate change, health crises—this course examines the role of international institutions and norms and asks w hether they can make the world a safer, more just place. Why did states create global institutions—and why in these forms? How does their structure limit or reinforce their ability to address problems? How do norms develop and change? What is the ro le of NGOs and of multinational corporations? How must the system adapt to new actors and challenges? Open to Austin W. Marxe School of Public and International Affairs students; others with Marxe School permission.

Prerequisites or Co-requisite: None

PAF 9185 Environmental Policy
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This course introduces students to the major features and debates in environmental policy, focusing primarily on the metropolitan environment in the United States. Students are introduced to environmental issues with respect to both the human and physical environments; the major interests groups that affect environmental policy; and the regulatory procedures under which environmental policy is implemented, particularly environmental impact analysis under NEPA and state and local environmental reviews. Open to Austin W. Marxe School of Public and International Affairs students; others with Marxe School permission.

Prerequisite: none

PAF 9186 Map Making for Public Policy
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

The course provides an introduction to basic map making skills and the use of maps and spatial data in policy applications. Students will learn how to create and interpret thematic maps, by hands-on experience with mapping software. Advanced topics will include spatial construction of data, and use spatial data in quantitative applications. Open to Austin W. Marxe School of Public and International Affairs students; others with Marxe School permission.

Prerequisite or Corequisite: PAF 9170

PAF 9190 Public Affairs Capstone Seminar
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This course is an advanced seminar in which students in their last semester before graduation produce a semester project drawing from the full course of study toward the Master of Public Administration (MPA). The project may involve policy research, intensive study of an organization, development of a rationale for new or changed service programs, or some combination of these. Special attention is placed on incorporating knowledge from the core MPA curriculum. Open with permission to Austin W. Marxe School of Public and International Affairs students.

Prerequisite: PAF 9172

PAF 9191 Mentorship in Public Affairs
20.0 Hours per week for 14 weeks or 35 hours per week for 8 weeks; 3.0 Credits

The completion of a mentorship assignment is a part of the National Urban Fellows program. Open only to students in the National Urban Fellows program. A pass/no-credit grade is assigned.

Prerequisite: none

PAF 9192 Public Affairs Fellowship
6.0 Hours; 6.0 Credits

This full-time internship is designed to allow students enrolled in specified MPA programs to have a more comprehensive and intensive policy and administrative experience. In addition to work at the internship site, students will be expected to keep journal records of their work, meet regularly with the course director in person or via distance learning, and submit a written summation of their experience at the conclusion of the course.

Prerequisite: Not open to students who have completed PAF 9191, PAF 9195, or PAF 9322.

PAF 9195 Public Affairs Internship
Work assignment requires 150 hours. Class sessions are determined by the instructor.

This course provides students with real-world administrative experience in a public or nonprofit organization.

It is required for Masters of Public Administration (MPA) students without at least one year of public administration work experience.
It may be used as an elective course for students with a public administration work history.
The work assignment requires 150 hours. Class sessions are determined by the instructor. The course is graded on a pass/no-credit basis. The internship pass/no-credit selection does not preclude the completion of another MPA elective course for pass/no-credit. PAF 9195 may be repeated, but only with the permission of the instructor and the Associate Dean of the School of Public Affairs.

It is not open to students who have completed PAF 9191, PAF 9192, or PAF 9322.

Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

PAF 9198 Public Affairs Workshop
15.0 Class hours (total over the semester, offered in three intensive class sessions); 1.0 Credit

This one-credit course provides focused training in a range of public policy and public or nonprofit management topics. Offered at several points during the semester, the workshop will be taught by external practitioners and/or Baruch faculty with special expertise in the subject matter. Sample topics include Total Quality Management, Board Relations for Nonprofits, Proposal Writing, Media Relations, and Building an Agency Budget. The workshop format includes: (1) assignment of readings and other materials, mailed to students 2-3 weeks prior to the initial class, (2) an all-day Saturday meeting, followed by two to three weeks to work on written assignments, (3) a second all-day Saturday session, and (4) a final assignment completed after the second Saturday session and mailed or e-mailed to the instructor.

Prerequisite: Open to all School of Public Affairs students; others with School of Public Affairs permission. Students may take the workshop up to three times, with the permission of their advisor.

PAF 9199 Selected Topics in Public Affairs
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

Topic will vary from offering to offering.

Prerequisite: none

PAF 9299 Selected Topics in Nonprofit Management
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

The course focuses on major areas in nonprofit management. Course may be taken more than once if the topics are different and with permission of advisor.

Prerequisite or Corequisite: None

PAF 9301 Introduction to School Leadership
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This course introduces students to the fundamental concepts of school leadership. Students will learn skills for analyzing, diagnosing, and solving organizational problems as school building leaders. Students will also begin to develop their own leadership vision and apply leadership practices to class assignments and projects.

Open only to Master of Science in Education students. Students from other degree programs by permission only.

Prerequisite: None.

PAF 9302 Organization Behavior in Colleges and Universities
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This course applies the behavioral sciences to higher education administration. Human relations principles will be developed through an analysis of problems in formal and informal organizations, in communication and participation, and in the development of understanding, cooperation, and motivation.

Open only to Master of Science in Education students. Students from other degree programs by permission only.

Not open to students who have completed PAF 9120.

Prerequisite: None

PAF 9306 Human Resource Management in Education
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This course focuses on the methods used to effectively recruit, train, and evaluate administrative staff in schools. There is an emphasis on developing the role of the teacher in human resource decision-making.

Open only to Master of Science in Education students.
Students from other degree programs by permission only.

Prerequisite: None

PAF 9307 School Performance Measurement
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This course prepares administrators to effectively collect, measure, and evaluate school data. Students will learn how to use data to make strategic decisions that directly influence school improvement and student achievement. Provides information on survey and demographic data, how to evaluate pupil test scores, and teacher observations.

Open only to Master of Science in Education students.
Students from other degree programs by permission only.

Prerequisites or Co-requisite: None

PAF 9308 Administrative Services in Colleges and Universities
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This course exposes students to the functions and organization of a broad range of administrative offices, processes, and responsibilities. It places the shared governance culture of higher education in the context of modern management theory and practice. It will describe how the organizational design of various colleges and universities are used to compare and contrast structures, eadership, and institutional culture.

Prerequisite: None.

PAF 9309 Instructional Leadership in Schools
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This course addresses the critical role of the school leader to supervise and manage the quality of instruction and student achievement. It focuses on staff supervision, the cultivation of strategic plans and school culture, as well as the implementation of effective teaching methods.

Open only to Master of Science in Education students.
Students from other degree programs by permission only.

Prerequisite: None.

PAF 9310 School Leadership and Organizational Management
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This course introduces students to the theory of organizational management and systems-thinking. It focuses on school planning, implementation, and evaluation.

Open only to Master of Science in Education students.
Students from other degree programs by permission only.

Prerequisite: None.

PAF 9311 Community Relations in Education
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This course explores the relationship of the school to the communities that it serves, including nterrelationships with parents' associations, the community school board, community leaders, city-wide and neighborhood media, the business community, and other elements in the neighborhood. Strategies for citizen involvement and tactics for achieving coordinated teamwork among social, governmental, and community organizations, and the schools are examined.

Open only to Master of Science in Education students.
Students from other degree programs by permission only.

Prerequisite: None

PAF 9312 Legal and Policy Issues in Education
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This course examines the legal framework of educational governance in the United States. It focuses on the constitutional, legislative, labor, and administrative laws and policies that apply to public, private, and charter schools. Special emphasis is placed on New York State law.

Open to Master of Science in Education students.
Students from other degree programs by permission only.

Prerequisite: None

PAF 9313 Capstone Seminar for the School Building Leader
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This is an advanced seminar in which students produce a semester project drawing from the full course of study toward the Masters of Science in Education in Educational Leadership (MSED-EL). The project may involve policy research, intensive study of an organization, development of a rationale for new or changed service programs, or some combination of these. Special attention is placed on incorporating aptitudes introduced in the core curriculum.

Open only to MSED-EL students.

Prerequisite: PAF 9301, PAF 9309, PAF 9310, PAF 9312, PAF 9314, and PAF 9319.

PAF 9314 Strategies in Classroom Management
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This course provides leadership strategies for improving classroom instruction and student achievement in school settings. Topics include leading and organizing for curriculum development, guiding staff toward using multiple instructional strategies to meet the needs of all learners, and promoting the use of meaningful and frequent assessment of student learning.

Open to Master of Science in Education students.
Students from other degree programs by permission only.

Prerequisite: None.

PAF 9315 Charter School Administration
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

Examines the challenges of administering charter schools. The history of the charter school movement is explored, with a special focus on New York City. The courses explores problems in the management of charter schools, including the planning, organization, operation, and coordination of departments; services and facilities; finances; staff selection and assignment; pupil guidance; and performance measurement.

Open only to Master of Science in Education students.
Students from other degree programs by permission only.

Prerequisite: None.

PAF 9316 Urban School Problems
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This course examines school problems using case studies. The problems and cases are selected by the instructor.

Open only to Master of Science in Education students.
Students from other degree programs by permission only.

Prerequisite: None.

PAF 9317 Research for the Educational Administrator
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This course examines the tools and strategies used in educational research. Students learn to be intelligent consumers of research studies. All stages of the research process are addressed: the determination of a problem amenable to research, appraisal of techniques aimed at solution, construction of a research proposal, obtaining and handling data, and evaluation of findings.

Prerequisite: None

PAF 9318 Educational Policy
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This course is designed for MPA and MSED students interested in learning more about educational policy at the local, state, and federal levels. Students in this course will critically examine the social, political, and economic theories behind current educational policies and policy initiatives, and evaluate their consequences and effects on U.S. public schooling.

Prerequisite: none

PAF 9319 School Finance and Budgeting
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This course addresses major issues in educational finance and budgeting with a particular focus on New York State and New York City. Financial topics include federal, state and local tax structures and resource allocation rules. This course also offers instruction on how to find and access additional sources for school revenue, such as through grant writing.

Open only to MSED and MPA students.
Students from other degree programs by permission only.

Prerequisite: None.

PAF 9320 Educational Leadership Internship I
3.0 Credits; 3.0 Hours

Part I of this two-course internship provides students with real-world administrative experience in an educational organization. The internship in part I consists of 300 hours in a work assignment.

Open only to Master of Science in Education students.

Prerequisite: Instructor Permission.

PAF 9321 Educational Leadership Internship II
3.0 Credits; 3.0 Hours

Part II of this two-course internship provides students with real-world administrative experience in an educational organization. The internship in part II consists of 300 hours in a work assignment.

Prerequisite: PAF 9320

PAF 9322 Internship in Higher Education Administration
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This internship provides part-time administrative experience in higher education institutions. It is intended to extend administrative knowledge, skills, and sensitivity through a range of on-the-job tasks and duties.

The work assignment requires 150 hours. Class sessions are determined by the instructor. This course is required for Masters of Science in Education in Higher Education (MSED-HEA) students with less than one year of work experience in higher education administration. It may be used as an elective course for students with higher education administration experience. The course is graded on a pass/no-credit basis. The internship pass/no-credit selection does not preclude the completion of another elective course for pass/no-credit. PAF 9322 may be repeated, but only with the permission of the instructor and the Associate Dean of the School of Public Affairs.

It is not open to students who have completed PAF 9191, PAF 9192, or PAF 9195.

Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

PAF 9323 Practicum I for School District Leaders
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This course is the first of a required two-course sequence for School District Leader (SDL) certification. The first part of the practicum sequence consists of 300 hours in a work assignment. This course is for students who have achieved School Building Leader (SBL) certification.

Open only to Master of Science in Education students.

Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

PAF 9324 Practicum II for School District Leaders
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This course is the second of a required two-course sequence for School District Leader (SDL) certification. The second part of the practicum sequence consists of 300 hours in a work assignment.

Prerequisites: PAF 9323.

PAF 9325 Institutional Research
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This course provides students wit h an overview of institutional research as both a profession and a m ode of inquiry. Students will review the fundamentals of the field in terms of conc epts, analytics and management. Additionally, they will also work directly wit h the analysis and reporting of data.

Prerequisite: PAF 9170

PAF 9330 Introduction to Higher Education Administration
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This course examines the structure and history of American higher education. The existing institutional structure of higher education will be studied, focusing on the main actors and their roles with respect to questions of governance and institutional decision-making. Key policy issues relating to the historical and structural development of higher education will be discussed.

Prerequisite: None

PAF 9331 The History of U.S. Higher Education
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

The origin, objectives, institutions, development, and societal relations of colleges, including community colleges and universities, will be explored. The historical factors influencing the current status of the American university will be emphasized.

Prerequisite: None

PAF 9332 Information Systems in Higher Education Administration
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This course examines information systems in institutions of higher education. It explores the processes for developing institutional objectives, identifying informational requirements, and analyzing systems. The course focuses on the information function and on an analysis of analytical and managerial tools available to the college, university, university system, and higher education government agency administrator.

Prerequisite: None.

PAF 9333 Curriculum and Instruction in Higher Education
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This course examines the academic programs and instructional systems in post-secondary education. The nature and interrelationship of general education and specialized education, liberal arts, and vocational education will be considered. The course looks at distance learning and the increasing globalization of higher education.

Prerequisite: None.

PAF 9334 Collective Bargaining in Higher Education
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This course will provide students with a working knowledge of collective bargaining in the United States. The various collective bargaining units found on a traditional college campus will be examined, such as faculty, administrative, trades, clerical, and graduate assistants. Historical events and future trends in higher education collective bargaining are covered.

Prerequisite: None.

PAF 9335 The Community College
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This course examines the structure and administration of community colleges, technical institutions, and adult education programs. It looks at the relationship between community colleges and four-year colleges.

Prerequisite: None.

PAF 9336 Student Affairs in Higher Education
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This course examines the theory and practice of student affairs in U.S. higher education institutions. It focuses on the history and theoretical foundations of student affairs, its organization and functions within a variety of institution types, and on the methods of supporting student success. The course builds professional competencies in student affairs practice and analyzes emerging issues.

Prerequisite: None

PAF 9337 Issues in Urban Higher Education
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This course focuses on issues and problems of higher education in cities. It will cover such subject areas as the role of education in development of the American city; the impact of immigration on schools; the debate over access and quality in neighborhoods; and the ways educational programs are employed in urban economic development.

Prerequisite: None.

PAF 9338 Higher Education, Politics, and Public Policy
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This course provides an in-depth examination of public policymaking for higher education in the United States. It emphasizes state-level policymaking for higher education but also surveys the role of federal and local governments. It explores the implications of the political setting of higher education for institutional leadership.

Prerequisite: None.

PAF 9339 The Financing of Higher Education
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This course provides an introduction for non-financial managers to the basic issues surrounding the financial management of colleges and universities. Topics to be covered include sources of revenue, such as tuition, research grants, and private gifts; working capital management; debt management; endowment management; and institutional expenditures.

Prerequisite: None.

PAF 9341 Special Education Administration
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

An examination of school programs and services for students with disabilities. Among the topics covered will be disabilities law, supervision of special education personnel, sources of program funding, and the mainstreaming of children in a variety of school settings.

Prerequisite: None.

PAF 9342 Political Policy Analysis in Education
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This course is designed for students interested in applying policy analysis tools to education. Students learn to assess the political feasibility as well as the technical attractiveness of policy alternatives in education.

Prerequisite: None.

PAF 9390 Capstone Seminar in Higher Education Administration
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

Advanced seminar in which st udents produce a semester project drawing from the full course of study towa rd the Masters of Science in Education, Higher Education Administration (MSED-HEA ). Special attention is placed on incorporating aptitudes introduced in the core curriculum. The project may involve policy research, intensive study of an organizati on, development of a rationale for new or changed service programs, or some combinat ion of these. Open only to MSED-HEA students.

Prerequisites or Co-requisites: PAF 9120, PAF 9308, PAF 9317 or PAF 9170, PAF 9330 and PAF 9336

PAF 9399 Selected Topics in Educational Administration
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This course examines policy and managerial issues in educational administration. The topics will be selected by the instructor.

Prerequisite: None.

PAF 9410 Global Economic Governance: Pacts, Actors, and Regimes
Credits 3.0, Hours 3.0

In the absence of global government, global economic governance organizations have emerged to coordinate, monitor, manage, and direct the economic and monetary activities of states and firms. This course will introduce students to the agreements and predominant institutions that compose global economic governance regimes, including the World Bank, International Monetary Fund, and World Trade Organization. It will examine organizational and voting structures, rules for legitimate state and non-state participants, compliance mechanisms, and agenda setting. Open to Austin W. Marxe School of Public and International Affairs students; others with Marxe School permission.

None

PAF 9415 International Economics
Credits 3.0, Hours 3.0

This course introduces students to the basic micro- and macro-economic principles that underlie international economic relations. Students will gain an understanding of international trade and finance and the effects of various international economic policies on domestic and world economic well-being. Open to Austin W. Marxe School of Public and International Affairs students; others with Marxe School permission. N ot open to students who have completed PAF 9130 or ECO 9704.

Prerequiste: None

PAF 9420 Global Communication
Credits 3.0, hours 3.0

In this class students will apply a comparative perspective to the communicative conditions that prevail in countries across the world, from everyday cultural practices (e.g., diplomatic ways of communicating in various societies) to organizational and policy considerations (e.g., free speech protections or restrictions). Students will sharpen their professional communication skills by speaking and writing on topics addressing issues of policy and administration in global contexts. Open to Austin W. Marxe School of Public and International Affairs students; others with Marxe School permission. Not open to students who have completed PAF 9103.

Prerequiste: None

PAF 9425 Western Hemisphere Affairs: Past, Present, and Future
Credits 3.0, Hours 3.0

This course will examine the contemporary policy agenda for political, economic, and social relations among countries in the Western Hemisphere. Among the contemporary cases under study will be: trade and regional economic integration; foreign investment and finance; energy; the environment; security and regional diplomacy; transnational migration; drug trafficking; and democratization and human rights. Open to Austin W. Marxe School of Public and International Affairs students; others with Marxe School permission.

Prerequiste: None

PAF 9426 Illicit Trade
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This course examines the role of illicit trade in the international system with a focus on its integration with other social, political, and economic processes. This class begins with an overview of the policy challenges associated with illicit trade and then examines a broad array of illicit trade activities. These activities include the drug trade, the arms trade, various forms of human trafficking, the trade in nat ural resources, and cyber -crime. Students should gain a knowledge of illicit trade broadly and its implications for international policymaking. Students will be expected to write policy related papers related to various illicit trade activities. Open to A ustin W. Marxe School of Public and International Affairs students; others with Marxe School permission.

Prerequiste: None

PAF 9430 Diaspora, Migration, and Transnational Life in the Western Hemisphere and Beyond
Credits 3.0, Hours 3.0

This course will examine the contemporary policy agenda for political, economic, and social relations among countries in the Western Hemisphere. Among the contemporary cases under study will be: trade and regional economic integration; foreign investment and finance; energy; the environment; security and regional diplomacy; transnational migration; drug trafficking; and democratization and human rights. Open to Austin W. Marxe School of Public and International Affairs students; others with Marxe School permission.

Prerequiste: None

PAF 9435 Security in the Western Hemisphere: A Multi-Dimensional Approach
Credits 3.0, Hours 3.0

This elective course examines the Western Hemisphere’s multidimensional security agenda, which encompasses traditional and non-traditional threats. Specifically, it takes an historical approach, analyzing at how “security” has been defined over time by primary state and non-state actors in the hemisphere. The course will also examine the region’s diverse multilateral forums for security cooperation, as well as “nontraditional” security issues, such as human trafficking, drug trafficking, and citizen security. Open to Austin W. Marxe School of Public and International Affairs students; others with Marxe School permission.

Prerequiste: None

PAF 9440 Trade Policy
Credits 3.0, Hours 3.0

This course focuses on the processes by which domestic and international actors shape trade policy. Protectionist, mercantilist, economic nationalist, and liberalist policies are addressed in the context of the international economy. Students will study trade law and the obligations and privileges established by treaty relationships. The role of the World Trade Organization and the significance of regional trade agreements will be discussed. Open to Austin W. Marxe School of Public and International Affairs students; others with Marxe School permission.

PAF 9415 or PAF 9130 or ECO 9704

PAF 9445 International Political Economy
Credits 3.0, Hours 3.0

This course analyzes the role that government plays in shaping production, investment, consumption, and allocation of resources through domestic economic policy as it interacts with other states and international institutions. Students will learn about important theories of international political economy including liberalism, realism, and Marxism and become familiar with the role and history of the major institutions that have been created by states to organize international economic relations. The course also addresses the way international economic policy impacts broader social forces and tries to manage the participation of civil society in formulating policy. Open to Austin W. Marxe School of Public and International Affairs students; others with Marxe School permission.

Prerequiste: PAF 9415 or PAF 9130 or ECO 9704 and PAF 9410

PAF 9450 International Development
Credits 3.0, Hours 3.0

The course provides an overview of the competing theories of economic development and growth, highlighting the importance of fundamental factors related to culture, geography, and institutions in shaping the prosperity of nations today. Students will learn about the challenges faced by governments, international organizations, and NGOs in addressing poverty and global income inequality, and the related approaches (successful and unsuccessful) taken. Open to Austin W. Marxe School of Public and International Affairs students; others with Marxe School permission.

Prerequiste: PAF 9415 or PAF 9130 and PAF 9170

PAF 9455 International Regulatory Policy
Credits 3.0, Hours 3.0

The course will address competitive regulatory regimes, through which governments seek to attract human capital, taxpayers, industries and jobs; the policy areas which governments alter to compose those regimes, including tax, trade, property rights, social welfare, and research policy; and how the areas which are subject to increasing international cooperation, intellectual property rights, accounting practices, movement of persons, and food safety, privilege the participation of different actors in formulating regulatory standards. Open to Austin W. Marxe School of Public and International Affairs students; others with Marxe School permission.

Prerequiste: PAF 9415 or PAF 9130

PAF 9490 International Affairs Capstone Seminar
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This course is an advanced seminar in which students in their last semester before graduation produce a semester project drawing from the full course of study toward the Master of International Affairs (MIA). The project may involve policy research, intensive study of an organization, development of a rationale for new or changed policy or programs, or some combination of these. Special attention is placed on incorporating knowledge from the core MIA curriculum. Open with permission to Austin W. Marxe School of Public and International Affairs students

Pre/ Co Requisites: PAF 9172

PAF 9610 Environmental Policy
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This course introduces students to the major features and debates in environmental policy, focusing primarily on the metropolitan environment in the United States. Students are introduced to environmental issues with respect to both the human and physical environments; the major interests groups that affect environmental policy; and the regulatory procedures under which environmental policy is implemented, particularly environmental impact analysis under NEPA and state and local environmental reviews.

Prerequisite: none

PAF 9627 Work-Life Communication
3.0 Hours, 3.0 Credits

This course is designed to explore the various communicative intersections between our work and family lives with special attention to issues of family, organizational, and political communication. Specific topics of discussion include: historical discourses, public policy debates, policy implementation processes, and executive/managerial/co-worker interactions. Theoretical connections, empirical research, and workplace application are explored.

Prerequisite: None

PAF 9699 Selected Topics in Public Policy
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

Focuses on major substantive areas of public policy. Course may be taken more than once if the topics are different and with permission of advisor.

Prerequisite: None

PAF 9710 Health And Health Care
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

Health care managers and policy makers seek to maximize the promise and minimize the problems associated with improving health and providing health services to all Americans. This involves understanding the determinants of population and individual health, the organizational structure and financing of the health care system, the public policy making process, and approaches to improved quality, performance and accountability.

Prerequisite: none

PAF 9715 Health Care Policy
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

The purpose of this course is to:

Prerequisite or Corequisite: PAF 9710

PAF 9720 Population Based Health Planning
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

Explores the history, rationale, and practice of population-based health care planning. Major features and issues in the total cycle of planning and control. Framework of classical population-based planning models and practice viewed from the perspective of marketplace scenario. The course assumes knowledge of the structure of the American health care system.

Prerequisite: PAF 9710

PAF 9725 Health Program, Policy and Performance Evaluation
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

This course applies generic skills in evaluation and performance measurement to the particular circumstances of health and medical care. Topics covered include defining the purpose of an evaluation; different organizational arrangements for evaluation; the specification of evaluation questions, selection of appropriate measures and data collection methods; analysis of evaluation data; and the maximization of the usefulness of evaluation findings. The course also addresses contemporary trends in health care quality measurement and improvement, and the role of performance measurements in creating a more accountable health care system.

Prerequisite: PAF 9710.

PAF 9730 Comparative Health Systems
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

Explores the salient features of health systems of several countries. In order to develop an ability to review and critique other systems, and to establish the relevance of the course, the U.S. system will be discussed first. The review of other systems will be done (1) by reviewing the systems descriptively and (2) by assessing how the systems comparatively address issues raised in the review of the U.S. system. Finally, the knowledge attained will be used to discuss possible future changes to the U.S. system. The course assumes a knowledge of the structure of the American health care system.

Prerequisite: PAF 9710.

PAF 9735 Health Politics and Policymaking
3.0 Hours, 3.0 Credits

This course examines the evolution of the major governmental programs involved with health insurance and health care in the United States. The goal is an understanding of the political dynamics that lead to successes and failures in health policymaking, and the development of strategies that can be used by governmental and non-governmental actors to accomplish policy change.

Prerequisite: PAF 9710 permission of instructor.

PAF 9760 Managerial Economics
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

Application of basic economic concepts to the decision problems of the firm. Demand, supply, cost and profit functions, and capital budgeting are analyzed conceptually and with the use of quantitative tools to give them empirical content.

Prerequisite: Open only to MPA in Health Policy and Administration students; not open to students who have completed PAF 9130.

PAF 9766 Health Care Costs and Financing
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

Description and analysis of health care costs and financing. Key topics include the factors and forces driving health care costs; demand for, operation of and side-effects of health insurance; health care cost-containment techniques; payment for physicians, hospitals and other providers; interaction of health care with the rest of the economy.

Prerequisite or Corequisite: PAF 9130, PAF 9710 or permission of instructor

PAF 9799 Selected Topics in Health Policy
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

Topics in health policy will vary from offering to offering.

Prerequisite: Grad 8 status and PAF 9710.

PAF 9999 Independent Study in Public Affairs
3.0 Hours; 3.0 Credits

Issues of special interest are examined. The subject matter is determined jointly by the student and instructor. An application is required. Hours to be arranged.

Prerequisite: none