CHEMISTRY PROFESSORS:    
Linda M. Hoffman
- Organic Chemistry
Charles J. Malerich
- General Chemistry
Keith M. Ramig
- Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry
  Chandrika Kulatilleke
- Inorganic / Analytical Chemistry
David J. Szalda
- General Chemistry
     
     
CHEMISTRY COURSES DESCRIPTIONS  
These course descriptions, copied from the Undergraduate Bulletin, have no official standing and are repeated here for convenience only. Official course descriptions are posted by the College under the Schedule of Classes.  
   
1000 (1) Chemistry and the Environment
2 lecture hours; 4 lab. Hours; 4 credits
This course is a non-mathematical presentation of the chemical principles and analysis techniques as they relato to problems of air and water pollution and to an understanding of the nature and effect of chemical additives in foods, detergents, drugs, gasoline, and other consumer products. Students who may be interested in taking more chemistry courses and/or attending graduate or professional school in the health sciences should elect CHM 2003 in place of CHM 1000. (Not open to students who have completed CHM 2003 [2100].)
2003 (2100) General Chemistry I
2 lecture hours; 4 lab. hours; 4 credits
This course is a survey of the basic principles and laboratory techniques of chemistry. Topics covered include stoichiometry, electronic structure of atoms, chemical bonding, molecular structure, states of matter, and solutions. Recommended for science majors and students with strong chemistry backgrounds. (Not open to students who have taken CHM 2100.)
Prerequisite: high school chemistry or departmental permission.
   
3001 (2004, 3100) General Chemistry II
2 lecture hours; 4 lab. hours; 4 credits
This course is a study of chemical kinetics, chemical equilibrium, thermodynamics, acids and bases, ionic equilibria, oxidation and reduction reactions, electrochemistry, and coordination compounds. (Not open to students who have completed CHM 3100.)
Prerequisite: CHM 2003 (2100) or departmental permission.
3003 (4300) Principles of Organic Chemistry
2 lecture hours; 4 lab. hours; 4 credits
This course deals with the properties, reactions, and synthesis of the major classes of organic compounds and functional groups, with special reference to hydrocarbons, aliphatic alcohols, ethers, carbonyls, carboxylic acids, and their derivatives; principles and applications of resonance and orbital theories, stereoisomerism, and reaction mechanisms; spectral properties of organic compounds and their functional groups.
Prerequisite: CHM 3001 (2004,3100) or departmental permission.
   
3006 (5300) Organic Chemistry
2 lecture hours; 4 lab. hours; 4 credits
This course is a continuation of CHM 3003 (4300). The laboratory exercises include distillation, crystallization, extraction, synthesis, gas-liquid chromatography, and qualitative organic analysis.
Prerequisite: CHM 3003 (4300) or equivalent.
4003 Physical Chemistry I
2 lecture hours; 4 lab. hours; 4 credits
This course is a study of the principles and techniques of classical physical chemistry. The following topics are studied: First and Second Law of Thermodynamics; Real an dIdeal Solutions; Electrochemistry; Kinetic Theory of Gases; and Chemical Kinetics and Transport Properties. The laboratory program covers physical chemical measurements, the treatment of experimental uncertainty, electrical measurements, and computer data processing.
Prerequisites: CHM 2003-3001 (2004) (2100-3100) and MTH 2010, 2011, or 2006.
This course will be offered if there is sufficient demand.
   
4004 Physical Chemistry II
2 lecture hours; 4 lab. hours; 4 credits
This course emphasizes the study of the structure and properties of the microscopic world. The following topics are studied: Quantum Mechanical Principles; Quantum Mechanics of Simple Systems; Spectroscopy; Statistical Mechanics; Solid State; and Liquid State. The laboratory program covers physical and chemical measurements, the treatment of experimental uncertainty, electrical measurements, and computer data processing.
Prerequisite: CHM 4003. Recommended: MTH 3010.
This course will be offered if there is sufficient demand.
  4900 (5900) Biochemistry
2 lecture hours; 4 lab. hours; 4 credits
This course is a study of the regulation and interrelationships of the main biochemical pathways utilized by prokaryotes and eukaryotes in maintaining cellular and organismal homeostasis. Laboratory exercises include the isolation and purification of proteins, carbohydrates, nucleic acids, and lipids. The techniques employed are titration, chromatography ( paper, thin layer, and column), and electrophoresis. (Not open to students who have completed CHM 5900.)
Prerequisite: CHM 3003 (4300). Corequisite: CHM 3005 (5300) or departmental permission.
     
5000-5004 (900) Independent Study
Hours and credits to be arranged