BIOLOGY PROFESSORS:    
Lea K. Bleyman, Professor Emerita
- General Biology and Genetics
Joel L. Brind
- General Biology and Endocrinology
Emil Gernert, Jr.
- General Biology and Physiology
Mary Jean Carey Holland
- General Biology and Microbiology
Joan Japha
- Biology and Cell Biology
  Valerie Schawaroch
- General Biology and Genetics
Seymour Schulman
- General Biology and Developmental Biology
Edward B. Tucker
- General Biology
John H. Wahlert
- General Biology and Anatomy
     
     
BIOLOGY COURSE DESCRIPTIONS  
These course descriptions, copied from the Undergraduate Bulletin, have no official standing and are repeated here for convenience only. Official course descriptions are posted by the College under the Schedule of Classes.  
   
1003 (6) Survey of the Living World
2 lecture hours; 4 lab. Hours; 4 credits
This course is a general survey of the diversity, adaptation, and evolution of life. Fundamental principles underlying the science of biology are studied to convey an appreciation of the evolutionary trends among the kingdoms and of the interaction of organisms with the environment. In the laboratory, students examine monerans, protists, fungi, plants, and animals, both living and preserved. (Not open to students who have taken BIO 2003. This course may not be taken with the Pass/Fail option.).
1005 (5) General Biology—Structure and Function—A Human Orientation
2 lecture hours; 4 lab. Hours; 4 credits
This is an introductory course in modern biology. Fundamental biological principles are studied and applied to an appreciation of the organization and operation of human beings. Laboratory exercises include dissection of specimens such as the frog and fetal pig and examination of prepared slides of many vertebrate organs and tissues. (Not open to students who have completed BIO 2003. This course may not be taken witht the Pass/Fail option).
   
2010 Principles of Biology I
2 lecture hours; 1 recitation hour; 3 lab Hours; 4.5 credits
This course introducs the student to biological science. Topics include the chemistry of life, cellular organization in prokaryotes and eukaryotes, metabolism, and animal anatomy and physiology: nutrition, circulation and gas exchange, immunity, nervous control, neuroendocrine integration, homeostasis, excretion and osmoregulation, and reproduction and development. Laboratory exercises include observation, dissection, and experimentation. Written laboratory reports are required. This course is especially recommended for students who are considering future study in biology and may wish to take BIO 3001 (2020), Principles of Biology II. (Not open to students who have completed BIO 1005) Prerequisite: high school biology and departmental permission.
3001 (2020) Principles of Biology II
2 lecture hours; 1 recitation hour; 3 lab Hours; 4.5 credits
This course is a continuation of BIO 2010. Topics include Mendelian genetics, molecular genetics, regulation of gene expression, evolution by natural selection, speciation and branching evolution, diversity of organisms and their classification; plant physiology, reproduction, and classification; and ecology of populations, communities, and ecosystems. Laboratory exercises include observation, dissection and experimentation and independent group research. Written laboratory reports and an oral presentation are required. Recitation includes oral reports on assigned readings. (Not open to studetns who have completed BIO 1003). Prerequisite: BIO 2010 or departmental permission.
   
2040 The Biology of Cells
2 lecture hours; 3 lab hours; 1 recitation hour; 4.5 credits
This course introduces the student to molecular and cellular biology. Lecture topics include cell structure and organization, intergration of structure and function in the living cell as a biological system, cellular aspects of inheritance, interactions of cells and viruses, recombinant DNA technology, and applications of biotechnology. Labortory studies include observation and experimentation employing biochemical systems, unicellular organisms, and a variety of differentiated cell types. Prerequisites: high school chemistry and departmental permission or one semester of college chemistry. This course will be offered if there is sufficient demand.
3005 (4011) Molecular and Cellular Biology
2 lecture hours; 4 lab. Hours; 4 credits
The biology of cells is examined with emphasis on the relationship between organelle structure and function. Activity of the nucleus, building and fueling the cell, and tools for studying genes will be discussed. Laboratory experiments are performed with isolated organelles or intact cells. Techniques include tissue culture, cell fractionation, biochemical assays for metabolic products, DNA isolation and modification, and cell transformation. Prerequisite: CHM 2003 (2100). Corequisites: CHM 3001 (3100) and departmental permission.
   
3010 (2013) Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy
2 lecture hours; 4 lab. Hours; 4 credits
The structure and function of vertebrate organ systems are discussed with reference to evolutionary and developmental history. Laboratories include macroscopic study of systems through dissection of shark and cat and microscopic examination of selected histological preparations of tissues An individual written report combines laboratory observation with literature and internet research. Prerequisites: BIO 3001 (2020) and departmental permission.
3012 Endocrinology
2 lecture hours; 4 lab hours; 4 credits
Consideration is given to the biosynthesis, secretion, regulation, and actions of the major bioactive chemical messengers, hormones, and neurotransmitters. Both classical and modern approaches to the study of endocrine tissues and substances are discussed, including replacement therapy, bioassay, immunohistochemistry, plasma membrane receptors, and radioimmunoassay. Laboratory exercises include studies of the microscopic anatomy of endocrine organs and their target tissues, determination of hormone concentrations using radioimmunoassay, and analysis of data from published scientific research on topics in endocrinology. Prerequisites: CHM 2003 (2100) and either BIO 1005 or 2010 and departmental permission.
   
3015 (2016) Principles of Genetics
2 lecture hours; 4 lab. Hours; 4 credits
This course provides a brief review of Mendelian genetics and emphasizes current topics of molecular, population and quantitative genetics. the laboratory exercises employ a variety of model organisms, such as corn, flies, bacteria, and mold. Classic experiments as well as modern molecular techniques including DNA isolation, PCR amplification and bacterial transformation will be performed. Prerequisites: BIO 3001 and departmental permission.
  4004 (3014) Microbiology
2 lecture hours; 4 lab. Hours; 4 credits
This course includes a general survey of the microbial world with emphasis on evolutionary relationships; a detailed study of the biology of bacteria, i.e., their morphology, growth, metabolism, replication, genetic mechanisms, and ecological roles; and a brief review of current attempts to control harmful microorganisms through sterilization, disinfection, and chemotherapy. Laboratory exercises include staining, enumeration, and identification techniques and provide a firm background in basic microbiological technique. Students are required to undertake a library research project and to present their results in both an oral and written format. Prerequisites: CHM 3001 (3100) and BIO 3001 (2020) and departmental permission.
For students with two other upper-level (3000 or above) courses in natural sciences, this course may serve as the capstone for the Tier III requirement.
     
4010 (3025, 2015) Human Physiology
2 Lecture hours; 4 lab. Hours; 4 credits
The interrelationship of organ systems in maintaining homeostasis in man is examined. Laboratory includes studies of human cardiopulmonary functions, hematology, and excitable tissues, i.e., nerves and muscles. Students are required to write a review article based on primary resources from current research literature. Perquisites: CHM 2003 (2100) and BIO 3010 (2013) and departmental permission.
For students with two other upper-level (3000 or above) courses in natural sciences, this course may serve as the capstone for the Tier III requirement.
  4015 (3011) Developmental Biology
2 lecture hours; 4 lab hours; 4 credits
This course includes a descriptive and experimental analysis of the developmental processes involved in gametogenesis, fertilization, cleavage, and gastrulation of representative vertebrate and invertebrate embryos and the inductive, genetic, and morphogenetic factors controlling these processes. The laboratory exercises involve a practical study of embryonic development using prepared slides and live chick, frog, and sea urchin embryos. Written laboratory reports and an oral presentation based on a library research project will be required. Prerequisites: BIO 3015 and departmental permission.
For students with two other upper-level (3000 or above) courses in natural sciences, this course may serve as the capstone for the Tier III requirement.
     
5000-5004 Independent Study
Hours and credits to be arranged
  5051-5053 Special Problems
4 Credits
     
6001-6003 Honors
Credits flexible, usually 4 credits per term.
Honors theses may be viewed on the
Newman Library web site.