Spring 2014 – Special Topics

AAS 3085 DMW– Contemporary Asian Literature
From Asia comes some of the most interesting literature being written today: Japan and China, each with a Nobel Laureate in literature in the past decade, and great writing from India, Indonesia, Singapore, Hong Kong, and more. We will read in translation short stories, plays, and novels from some of these countries and ask two key questions: can the past be seen in the present? and what is the relation among literature, consumerism and commercialism today?

AAS 3085 FMWA – History of Southeast Asia 
Southeast Asia is remarkable for its linguistic, cultural, social and religious diversity, and is often called the “crossroads of the world. This course introduces students to the key historical themes in the history of Southeast Asia as a region from the eighteenth century to the present, while exploring the national political narratives of its largest countries—Indonesia, Vietnam, Thailand, the Philippines, and Burma. Particular attention will be paid to the following topics: the coherence of Southeast Asia as a discrete historical region; European imperialism and the growth of colonial capitalism; the emergence of anti– colonial movements including nationalism and communism; World War II and Japanese occupation; the Vietnam War and other wars of independence and decolonization; the impact of the Cold War and the rise of authoritarian/military regimes; and finally, globalization and the geo– political and economic organization of these countries into the bloc called ASEAN.  The course focuses on interactions between states, elites and mass society in ways that attempt to link broad political and economic changes to everyday social and cultural experiences.

 ART 3040 DMW– Art and War
What is war art? Is it a specific genre? What purpose does it serve? Is it propaganda? Is it cathartic for the creator? How does art influence war and how does war influence art? Does war art serve as a warning? As remembrance? This course will explore the relationship between the visual arts and war. The course will cover conflicts from the nineteenth through the twenty– first centuries. We will examine various aspects of visual culture including, but not limited to, print cycles, paintings, sketches, the creation of and the destruction of memorials, posters, sculptures and depictions of war narratives. The course will include on– site visits to war memorials and the place of war remembrance in contemporary culture.            


ART 3041 HTR – Creating a Personal Brand; Self– Promotion for Graphic Designers  
This class will introduce you to the business of graphic design–from the creation of a graphic design resume, business card, and portfolio to standard graphic design business practices such as pricing, negotiating contracts, writing proposals, and invoicing. Students will learn about ethical responsibilities of graphic designers through the exploration of design problems presented when working with non– profit companies, environmental and political organizations as well as major corporations. We will also cover the history and use of copywrights, fonts and image usage, ad placement and self– promotion.  Prerequisites:  ART 2050 plus any ART 3000 level course AND department permission [please call 646-312-4052] 

BLS 3085 EMWA – Cuba in Post–Cold War Latin America
The course examines Cuba's role within the context of Latin America's new political and economic order. With the US unilateral Cold War policies of militarization coming to an end, Latin America is rapidly devising strategies for reunification and cooperation, and forming regional trade and labor alliances, in order to meet the challenges of neoliberalism, free trade, privatization, the IMF, immigration and globalization. In view of these hemispheric developments, and as the sole surviving government of the Cold War era, Cuba's model of socialism will be studied as either effective and influential or as incongruous and obsolete for the continent's future.

BLS 3085 FTRA – The Civil Rights Movement
The course examines the socio– economic roots and origins of the civil rights movement and the major international and domestic processes that fueled the movement’s development, including the demographic transfer of black southerners, Puerto Ricans, Chicanos and Native Americans out of rural economies and into urban spaces and the rise of de– colonization movements in Asia, Latin America, and Africa during WWII.   Major topics include the decline of the cotton economy in the south and the rise of the southern civil rights movement, the early northern civil rights movement, the relationship between the cold war and the struggle for civil rights, the impact of third world revolutionary struggles on the politics of the movement, Martin Luther King, Malcolm X, urban revolt, SNCC, the Black Panthers, the women's movement and the Vietnam War. Guiding questions include:  What social and economic forces led to the rise of the movements? What was the relationship between domestic and international politics and struggles? What was the relationship between formal government policies and the social movements? Who changed society? Why did the aims of the civil rights movement change over time?  How did the civil rights and black power era re– define the meaning of American freedom and how did this movement transform American history and life?

BLS 3085 PMWA – Race, Class and Gender in Brazil
This course examines the poly-cultural history of Brazil by using a theoretical framework that emphasizes the role of race, gender and ethnicity--and how these variables have affected socio-economic mobility in Brazil. The course will in particular explore the significance of Portuguese colonialism, and the role of African/Indigenous heritage people in Brazil.  Also the course will focus on other European immigrants that came in the late nineteenth century and early twentieth century such as the German, Italians, and Spanish. There will also be special attention paid to the large populations of Japanese and Middle-eastern people that came to Brazil as well.  Furthermore the course will explore how these various ethnic groups have produced hybrid cultures in art, music, dance, cuisine as well in other cultural idioms that have shaped a poly-cultural Brazilian community.

COM 4101 CMWA – Contemporary Issues in Digital Media
This course offers students a survey of topics and issues surrounding digital media. The first half of the course provides an introductory informative and historical perspectives on today’s digital media platforms, from the Internet to Facebook, Twitter, Wikipedia and Google. Through analysis and critical discussions, we aim to discuss the ways each of these technologies changes our understanding of what media are. The second half of the course examines the literature engaging the impact of these technologies across a wide array of issues, including: technopobia, privacy, data mining, digital activism, freedom and diversity of expression, hacking and more. Course materials are drawn from various academic fields spanning law, internet studies, globalization and social theory. The overall aim of the course is to provide a critical media literacy for students through the development of the necessary lexicon and critical framework than can aid them in thinking about these crucial developments and issues that redefine how we understand media and communications.

COM 4101 DMWA – Leadership and Organizations
This course is about effective and ineffective leadership.  Using narratives -- fiction, films, and history -- it will explore ways leaders can inspire and guide their organizations, cope with competing interests and conflicting values, and maintain their energy and integrity.  It will ask how power and authority are best acquired, how and why they are so often abused, and how supporters and even opponents can shape what leaders do.

COM 4101 FMWA – Leadership and Organizations
This course is about effective and ineffective leadership.  Using narratives -- fiction, films, and history -- it will explore ways leaders can inspire and guide their organizations, cope with competing interests and conflicting values, and maintain their energy and integrity.  It will ask how power and authority are best acquired, how and why they are so often abused, and how supporters and even opponents can shape what leaders do.

COM 4101 MTA – Computer Mediated Communication & Contemporary Culture
This course examines the impact of computers on culture and situates the current ubiquity of computers in everyday life within larger histories of technological and scientific change. Using a range of texts from the humanities and social sciences, as well as work by filmmakers and visual artists, the course provides an overview of key aspects of computer-mediated life in our digital age. In addition to working toward a deep understanding of our required texts, the course also examines other topics, including new media art practices, debates about the real and the virtual, media convergence, surveillance, open source culture, activism and social networking. Central to our efforts will be a consistent examination of the ways social identities, as informed by gender, race, class, sexuality and other vectors of difference, shape and are shaped by media, science, and technology.  

COM 4101 UWA –   New Media and the Attention Economy
This course focuses on the interface of the economic and everyday cultural convergence of newer digital (especially social) media and older broadcast media and its effects on our emotions, our ways of processing information, perceiving and knowing the world and communicating in it. Changes in journalism, politics, and business will be considered.           

COM 4900 AMWA – Studies in Language and Social Interaction
This course introduces an ethnographic approach to language and interpersonal communication. Such an approach tries to understand the bases for social relations and social interaction based on the observation of, and the participation in, actual instances of interpersonal communication. Concerns of face, speech acts, person-referring forms, terms for talk, relational dialectics, narrative, and rules and norms are introduced as theoretical frameworks for the analysis of interpersonal communication. We will turn our attention to moments of intercultural communication since different cultural communicative patterns for interpersonal communication are active there. These often result in miscommunication, negative stereotyping, injustices, discrimination, and the like.

COM 4900 CMWA – Research Strategies in Communication
This class explores quantitative research methodology and its possibilities for creating insights into the study of communication. Throughout class and lab deliberations you should be asking this question: How do issues of research and methodology connect with the real world issues I confront in processes of intrapersonal communication, interpersonal communication, small group communication, mass mediated communication, public communication, and intercultural communication? To begin, some general orientations to research methodology within the discipline of communication studies will be discussed. The overall organization gives special attention to techniques of quantitative data analysis and asks: how are interpretive claims theoretically guided and formulated on the basis of empirical data? Whether you are, or hope to be working in a communication related industry, you will need to be competent and professional consumers and creators of information. Data analysis is the art of examining, summarizing, and drawing conclusions from data. Within the discipline of communication studies, knowing the right questions to ask, and how to best answer them, are important features of this research process.

COM 4900 DMWA – Ethics of Professional Communication
This course explores the philosophical and ethical issues related to the practice of professional communication. Class topics encourage the consideration of questions of ethics and values that are likely to arise for professional communicators in the course of their careers. Readings for the course establish an interdisciplinary foundation for exploring these questions, drawing on the disciplines of philosophy, rhetoric, psychology, and communication. The global goal of the course is to motivate individual and collective commitment to best practices.


COM 4900 EMWA    – Conflict Resolution         
This course explores conflict resolution in interpersonal, intergroup, intercultural, and international communication. Topics include theories of conflict, types and sources of conflict, strategies and tactics of conflict resolution, alternative dispute resolution, conflict resolution coaching, and problem– solving techniques.

The course is designed to provide a theoretical foundation as well as practices in how to apply the covered methods to a variety of personal and professional contexts. The course serves as a capstone for corporate communication minors; majors are also invited.

COM 4900 ETRA – Internal Communication
This capstone course introduces the role and value of strategic internal communication within today’s global business organizations and reviews the evolution of the practice from a one-way mode of communication to a valuable, strategic business function impacting organizational effectiveness. Special topics in internal communication will be explored, such as internal branding, the CEO’s role in the internal communications process, the importance of research as the foundation for communications strategy development, and effective methods of communicating with employees during change situations. We will also discuss challenges and issues communicators face in trying to reach employees at all levels and examine strategies and tools for developing a united, engaged and productive workforce. Throughout the course, we’ll read and discuss articles, research reports and case studies that support our understanding and application of strategic internal communication. You will apply what you’ve learned to independent and group projects. Several practicing internal communication professionals will also be speaking with us to bridge classroom and workplace practice.             

COM 4900 FMWA – Conflict Resolution          
This course explores conflict resolution in interpersonal, intergroup, intercultural, and international communication. Topics include theories of conflict, types and sources of conflict, strategies and tactics of conflict resolution, alternative dispute resolution, conflict resolution coaching, and problem– solving techniques.

The course is designed to provide a theoretical foundation as well as practices in how to apply the covered methods to a variety of personal and professional contexts. The course serves as a capstone for corporate communication minors; majors are also invited.

COM 4900 UWA – Conflict Resolution
This course explores conflict resolution in interpersonal, intergroup, intercultural, and international communication. Topics include theories of conflict, types and sources of conflict, strategies and tactics of conflict resolution, alternative dispute resolution, conflict resolution coaching, and problem– solving techniques.

The course is designed to provide a theoretical foundation as well as practices in how to apply the covered methods to a variety of personal and professional contexts. The course serves as a capstone for corporate communication minors; majors are also invited.

ENG 3950 DMWA – Contemporary Asian Literature
This course will read in translation the literature of three to five countries in Asia, choosing from China, India, Indonesia, Japan, Pakistan, Taiwan and others. Some are established writers who have won international prizes like the Nobel; others are emerging writers who have just recently been translated in electronic sources.

ENG 3950 EMWA - The Jazz Age
They were the beautiful people who made their world more beautiful with their art and wit. A core group of Americans in Paris included S. and G. Murphy, S. and Z. Fitzgerald, E. Hemingway, e.e. cummings, A, Macleish, J. Dos Passos, D. parker, S. Calder, G. Gershwin, C. Porter; with art and dance stars Picasso, Leger, Cocteau and others. The course celebrates the novels poems, plays, paintings, and music of this era.

ENG 3950 PMWA – Black British Writers
The black presence in Britain has a long history but until the second half of the twentieth century, it remained relatively unknown. Today, as former colonial subjects from Africa, the Caribbean, India and Pakistan settle into their new role as citizens of Britain, the once-colonizing nation is experiencing a cultural rebirth. We will focus attention in this course on the new writing by black writers emerging from contemporary Britain and discuss the historical contexts that have led to this moment – from slavery and migration to what Louise Bennett calls the “re-colonization” of Britain. We will read, discuss, and analyze important works by a variety of writers including Olaudah Equiano, Mary Prince (both whom wrote slave narratives), Ben Okri, David Dabydeen, Merle Collins, Caryl Phillips, Buchi Emecheta, and Zadie Smith. We will examine the ideas of a few notable critics such as by E.R. Braithwaite, C.L.R. James, and Paul Gilroy, and their influence on this new wave of writing.

This is an opportunity to encounter new writers and new histories and to expand your growing knowledge of the literatures of the world.

FLM 4900 MTA Critical Approaches Film:  Four American Directors
This film explores issues of authorship, genre, literary adaptation, and film and social history through the scrutiny of feature films by four diverse and distinctive directors:  John Huston, Martin Scorsese, Jim Jarmusch, and Steven Soderbergh.  Collectively, their careers span a half century of American cinema, and suggest the possibilities for personal expression within and outside traditional Hollywood genres and industry structures.  This is a writing-intensive class, and in-class exams, weekly film journals, and a research paper are required.  No previous course experience in film studies is required.

HIS 3360 BTRA – The Jews in the Ottoman Empire
This course introduces students to the history of the Ottoman Empire through the prism of its Jewish population from 1492 to present– day Turkey. While the course is organized chronologically, the approach is interdisciplinary: the readings include historical essays, anthropological studies, poetry, first– person testimonies and other genres. We will examine the messianic movement that arose in the 16th century, expressions of Zionism when Israel was under Ottoman rule, the development of two specific cities (Istanbul and Salonika), and Turkey’s ambivalent relationship to Jews in the last century. The course will focus on the political and religious impact of the Empire on its Jewish population and in turn, the ways in which the Jews shaped numerous aspects of the cultural and social in the Empire, in modern Turkey and beyond.

The goal is for students to learn about the rise and fall of the Ottoman Empire, its remarkable contribution to politics, law, arts and culture, and to appreciate the rich and diverse Jewish heritage that developed on Ottoman soil, particularly Sephardic culture, language and political aspirations.

HIS 3360 EMWA – The Holocaust in History and Memory
This course examines the destruction of European Jewry during World War II in a transnational context. Topics include: the emergence of modern anti– Semitism; the development of Nazism in Germany and pan– European fascist movements; Jewish responses to the crises of the 1930s; the organization of mass murder and machineries of destruction; collaboration and resistance; the concentration camp and ghetto system; gender and the holocaust; and the memorialization of the holocaust “after Auschwitz.

HIS 3460 DMWA - War and American Society Since The 1930s
Though the last war on American soil ended more than one hundred years ago, military conflict has left an indelible imprint on the nation’s social and economic structure, politics, and culture. This course explores key trends in American history since the 1930s have been profoundly shaped by war, from the rise of the national security state and America’s global economic dominance to the evolution of the high-tech sector.

HIS 3460 FTRA – The Civil Rights Movement
The course examines the socio– economic roots and origins of the civil rights movement and the major international and domestic processes that fueled the movement’s development, including the demographic transfer of black southerners, Puerto Ricans, Chicanos and Native Americans out of rural economies and into urban spaces and the rise of de– colonization movements in Asia, Latin America, and Africa during WWII.   Major topics include the decline of the cotton economy in the south and the rise of the southern civil rights movement, the early northern civil rights movement, the relationship between the cold war and the struggle for civil rights, the impact of third world revolutionary struggles on the politics of the movement, Martin Luther King, Malcolm X, urban revolt, SNCC, the Black Panthers, the women's movement and the Vietnam War. Guiding questions include:  What social and economic forces led to the rise of the movements? What was the relationship between domestic and international politics and struggles? What was the relationship between formal government policies and the social movements? Who changed society? Why did the aims of the civil rights movement change over time?  How did the civil rights and black power era re– define the meaning of American freedom and how did this movement transform American history and life?

HIS 3860 CTRA – The Arab Spring 
This course will examine the recent uprisings in the Middle East and North Africa.  It will explore the uprisings’ historical, political, social, and economic causes; their immediate sparks; and the reasons for their different outcomes. It will also explore their international repercussions—especially their effects on US policies throughout the region.

HIS 3860 FMWA – History of Southeast Asia 
Southeast Asia is remarkable for its linguistic, cultural, social and religious diversity, and is often called the “crossroads of the world. This course introduces students to the key historical themes in the history of Southeast Asia as a region from the eighteenth century to the present, while exploring the national political narratives of its largest countries—Indonesia, Vietnam, Thailand, the Philippines, and Burma. Particular attention will be paid to the following topics: the coherence of Southeast Asia as a discrete historical region; European imperialism and the growth of colonial capitalism; the emergence of anti– colonial movements including nationalism and communism; World War II and Japanese occupation; the Vietnam War and other wars of independence and decolonization; the impact of the Cold War and the rise of authoritarian/military regimes; and finally, globalization and the geo– political and economic organization of these countries into the bloc called ASEAN.  The course focuses on interactions between states, elites and mass society in ways that attempt to link broad political and economic changes to everyday social and cultural experiences.            

HIS 3860 PTRA – Drugs and Violence in Mexico
This course analyses the history of Mexico’s drugs war of the last two decades, taking a critical look at how the problem with drugs has fed into problematic images of Mexico. The course will examine Mexican politics in connection to the trade in drugs as one of the world’s largest businesses. Students in this course will read a variety of sources, including short stories, journalism, cartoons and films (all in English translation) to examine why the drugs war exists and what it means for contemporary Mexicans.

IDC 4050H CMWH – Political Literature from the Athenian Republic to the Global State
This course explores how pre-modern conceptions of sovereignty, agency, and freedom, inform our present-day negotiations—civic, personal, economic, and political—and condition our views of political agency and civic legitimacy.  Our texts may include Aristotle, Politics (excerpts); Plato, The Apology of Socrates; Boethius, The Consolation of Philosophy; St. Augustine, Confessions (excerpts); Niccolò Machiavelli, The Prince and the Discourses (excerpts); Thomas Hobbes, The Leviathan (excerpts); Thomas More, Utopia; Francis Bacon, “The New Atlantis;” and Christopher Marlowe, Tamburlaine I and II.  Each class session will be dually focused on the past and present, commencing with a discussion of a contemporary political document that engages the subject of sovereignty in today’s global age: the UN charter, the EU constitution, the Geneva Convention, the mission and bylaws of the American Red Cross, corporate white papers (for example, GE’s on best recycling practices or JP Morgan’s on Health Savings Accounts), vacillating between the present day and the social and intellectual histories that have given it shape. Students are expected to lead their peers in discussion through formal and informal presentations, and through their researched writing, which will be analytical and investigative in nature.

IDC 4050H CTRH – Translating Between Worlds: Anthropology and Literature
Whenever something moves from one cultural context into another -- a person, a religion, a literary text, an idea – it is profoundly altered by that shift. Both anthropology and literature scrutinize such transitions, studying the way meanings change as contexts do. In this class, anthropological texts and literary works will be read together for what they tell us about how we change when we move from one world to another. Readings will include Katherine Russell's memoir Dreaming in Hindi,  Vassilis Alexakis' Greek-French memoir-novel Foreign Words, Jorge Luis Borges's seminal essay The Translators of the Thousand and One Nights and anthropologist James Clifford's analyses of literary texts in Writing Culture. We will trace the translation history of texts such as the ancient Sanskrit Upanishads, translated into Persian in the 17th century, then into Latin, and from there coming to influence 19th-century American Transcendentalism which, in turn, plays a role in the popularity of yoga as a sort of latter-day transcendentalism in contemporary America. Guest lecturers will contribute perspectives from the related fields of folklore studies and history. For their coursework, students will have the opportunity to conduct research at the Rubin Museum, and those who are polylingual will be encouraged to pursue a translation project of their own.

JRN 3900 ETRA – Writing About Musician's Lives
Tens of thousands of people in the New York are involved with music, from composing to recording to performance to management. This course exposes students to the lives of New York City musicians involved in various genres: from classical (orchestral, chamber, vocal) to opera to jazz (old style, new style), country, rock, hip– hop, Latin, Broadway, Off Broadway and more. Students read about musicians, interview them and the people they work with and write publishable articles for print and multimedia. Guest speakers add their expertise to the student experience.    

JRN 3900 FTRA – Covering Education
Education has become a major political battleground, with everyone from philanthropists, corporations, politicians, activists and parents fighting over very different visions of the future of public education. In covering education, we will explore everything from how the end of the Bloomberg administration will impact one of the most radical efforts at transforming New York City’s massive school system to the role of MOOCs (massive online courses) in reshaping higher education. We will develop sources, do research and write articles based on these issues.

JWS 3950 BTRA – The Jews in the Ottoman Empire
This course introduces students to the history of the Ottoman Empire through the prism of its Jewish population from 1492 to present– day Turkey. While the course is organized chronologically, the approach is interdisciplinary: the readings include historical essays, anthropological studies, poetry, first– person testimonies and other genres. We will examine the messianic movement that arose in the 16th century, expressions of Zionism when Israel was under Ottoman rule, the development of two specific cities (Istanbul and Salonika), and Turkey’s ambivalent relationship to Jews in the last century. The course will focus on the political and religious impact of the Empire on its Jewish population and in turn, the ways in which the Jews shaped numerous aspects of the cultural and social in the Empire, in modern Turkey and beyond.

The goal is for students to learn about the rise and fall of the Ottoman Empire, its remarkable contribution to politics, law, arts and culture, and to appreciate the rich and diverse Jewish heritage that developed on Ottoman soil, particularly Sephardic culture, language and political aspirations.

JWS 3950 EMWA – The Holocaust in History and Memory
This course examines the destruction of European Jewry during World War II in a transnational context. Topics include: the emergence of modern anti– Semitism; the development of Nazism in Germany and pan– European fascist movements; Jewish responses to the crises of the 1930s; the organization of mass murder and machineries of destruction; collaboration and resistance; the concentration camp and ghetto system; gender and the holocaust; and the memorialization of the holocaust “after Auschwitz.

JWS 4900 DMW – Performing Immigration on Stage and Screen
This course considers performance traditions of emigrants and exiles around the world. What can theater and film teach us about the experience of migrants and displaced peoples? Topics include the theater of Irish, Italian, African, Russian, Jewish, Chinese, Japanese, and Hispanic immigrants to the United States as well as postcolonial theater and film in South Africa, India, and Brazil, immigration and Hollywood, contemporary artistic responses to immigration, and the theater of the Arab Spring.  

LTS 3085 EMWA – Cuba in Post– Cold War Latin America
The course examines Cuba's role within the context of Latin America's new political and economic order. With the US unilateral Cold War policies of militarization coming to an end, Latin America is rapidly devising strategies for reunification and cooperation, and forming regional trade and labor alliances, in order to meet the challenges of neoliberalism, free trade, privatization, the IMF, immigration and globalization. In view of these hemispheric developments, and as the sole surviving government of the Cold War era, Cuba's model of socialism will be studied as either effective and influential or as incongruous and obsolete for the continent's future.

LTS 3085 ETRA – Lost in Translation
What must we as educators in the study of History teach about the past? What research is necessary prior to providing an honest and objective historical assessment? There is a saying: "perception is reality". How can we then speak of historical objectivity? Historical   objectivity,   in my opinion,   is the basis of education. This semester I have decided to channel and explore Latin America history differently. Not through the eyes of the traditional historian, not through "official" documents, but from the view of the "popular historian," who casts doubt on the official version of the facts and seeks the truth with new means at his/her disposal:  cinematography. During the semester we will study films made by those who have dedicated their lives to the pursuit of hidden truths in the History of Latin America.

LTS 3085 PMWA – Race, Class and Gender in Brazil
This course examines the poly-cultural history of Brazil by using a theoretical framework that emphasizes the role of race, gender and ethnicity--and how these variables have affected socio-economic mobility in Brazil. The course will in particular explore the significance of Portuguese colonialism, and the role of African/Indigenous heritage people in Brazil.  Also the course will focus on other European immigrants that came in the late nineteenth century and early twentieth century such as the German, Italians, and Spanish. There will also be special attention paid to the large populations of Japanese and Middle-eastern people that came to Brazil as well.  Furthermore the course will explore how these various ethnic groups have produced hybrid cultures in art, music, dance, cuisine as well in other cultural idioms that have shaped a poly-cultural Brazilian community.

LTS 3085 PTRA – Drugs and Violence in Mexico
This course analyses the history of Mexico’s drugs war of the last two decades, taking a critical look at how the problem with drugs has fed into problematic images of Mexico. The course will examine Mexican politics in connection to the trade in drugs as one of the world’s largest businesses. Students in this course will read a variety of sources, including short stories, journalism, cartoons and films (all in English translation) to examine why the drugs war exists and what it means for contemporary Mexicans.

NMA 3041 MT – Performing with New Media Arts  
This interdisciplinary course offers students practice– based methods that combine new media arts and performing.  Theatre and New Media Arts students will collaborate on devising original projects that include multimedia storytelling, real– time storytelling, and virtual storytelling. Through exercises and studio work students will study and apply current techniques that integrate acting and video editing in order to create dynamic performances using live– feed and pre– recorded video projection environments. Knowledge of basic video editing software sush as imovie, Isadora, Final Cut Pro, Premier or Movie Master is useful, but not required. No stage experience is necessary.  Students will receive credit for either THE 4103 or NMA 3041, not both:  Pre–requites:  THE 1041 or THE 1043 or NMA 2050 or the permission of the department.

POL 3999H CMWH – Political Literature from the Athenian Republic to the Global State
This course explores how pre-modern conceptions of sovereignty, agency, and freedom, inform our present-day negotiations—civic, personal, economic, and political—and condition our views of political agency and civic legitimacy.  Our texts may include Aristotle, Politics (excerpts); Plato, The Apology of Socrates; Boethius, The Consolation of Philosophy; St. Augustine, Confessions (excerpts); Niccolò Machiavelli, The Prince and the Discourses (excerpts); Thomas Hobbes, The Leviathan (excerpts); Thomas More, Utopia; Francis Bacon, “The New Atlantis;” and Christopher Marlowe, Tamburlaine I and II.  Each class session will be dually focused on the past and present, commencing with a discussion of a contemporary political document that engages the subject of sovereignty in today’s global age: the UN charter, the EU constitution, the Geneva Convention, the mission and bylaws of the American Red Cross, corporate white papers (for example, GE’s on best recycling practices or JP Morgan’s on Health Savings Accounts), vacillating between the present day and the social and intellectual histories that have given it shape. Students are expected to lead their peers in discussion through formal and informal presentations, and through their researched writing, which will be analytical and investigative in nature.

PSY 3040 CTRA – Psychology of Discrimination: Racism, Sexism and Other Isms
This course explores the psychological underpinnings of prejudice and discrimination using foundational theories in cognitive, social, personality and industrial organizational psychology. The course will cover well– recognized forms of prejudice and discrimination, such as racism, sexism, anti– Semitism, and heterosexism.
Note: This course cannot be taken if you have already taken PSY 3040 Psychology of Stereotypes and Prejudice.

PSY 3040 QTRA – Psychology of Prevention Science
The late 19th Century saw a revolution in our ability to prevent devastating physical ailments through the promotion of hygiene. The development of vaccines in the 20th Century gave parents the possibility of safeguarding their children from lethal diseases, for which there are still no cures. What then are the mechanisms with which we can prevent mental disorders in the 21st Century?  Recent research has found that in the area of mental illness, prevention is a distant goal, while risk reduction and health promotion are viable foci of intervention.  This course will examine the history and societal tensions between mental health promotion and mental illness treatment. 

Students will study the Two Pathway Model of Prevention and learn the skills necessary to promote mental health and reduce risks for mental illness through various therapeutic interventions, while learning the specific vocabulary of prevention research.  We will examine current Primary, Secondary, & Tertiary Models of Preventions, which have given way to more contemporary models which use Universal, Selective, Indicated and Relapse Models of Preventions. (Prof. Lawrence Elcock, MA)

PSY 9786 UTA – How Adults Learn: Implications for Organizational Psychology

PSY 9786 UWA –Group Psychology and Organizational Systems

PSY 9786 URA – Executive Coaching

PSY 9786 URB –Organizational Consulting

THE 4102 DMW – Performing Immigration on Stage and Screen
This course considers performance traditions of emigrants and exiles around the world. What can theater and film teach us about the experience of migrants and displaced peoples? Topics include the theater of Irish, Italian, African, Russian, Jewish, Chinese, Japanese, and Hispanic immigrants to the United States as well as postcolonial theater and film in South Africa, India, and Brazil, immigration and Hollywood, contemporary artistic responses to immigration, and the theater of the Arab Spring.                 

THE 4103 MT – Performing with New Media Arts  
This interdisciplinary course offers students practice– based methods that combine new media arts and performing.  Theatre and New Media Arts students will collaborate on devising original projects that include multimedia storytelling, real– time storytelling, and virtual storytelling. Through exercises and studio work students will study and apply current techniques that integrate acting and video editing in order to create dynamic performances using live– feed and pre– recorded video projection environments. Knowledge of basic video editing software sush as imovie, Isadora, Final Cut Pro, Premier or Movie Master is useful, but not required. No stage experience is necessary.  Students will receive credit for either THE 4103 or NMA 3041, not both.

 

The City University of New York