Fall 2014 – Special Topics

AAS 3085 ETRA - The Vietnam War
Most Americans remember the Vietnam War through a small yet emotionally-charged set of images: films such as Apocalypse Now and Platoon; photographs of self-immolating monks and peasant girls burned by napalm; long-haired youth protesting in Washington; a low, black marble wall with names carved side by side.  However, this is only one side of history.  What the Vietnamese remember as the “American War” had deeper and more terrible legacies than most Americans know.  It was a war that regions, villages, and even families fought against and within one another, for complex historical, political, and cultural reasons that defy Cold War caricatures.  This course will explore the Second Indochina War, known in the US as the “Vietnam War” and in Vietnam as the “American War”.  The objectives of this course are twofold: first, to introduce students to the historical context of the Vietnam War, a major episode in the 20th century histories of both the United States and Vietnam, and second, to integrate the experiences and perspectives of various participants in the war.  We will be analyzing a number of different sources (including fiction, film, memoirs, and photography) to explore the experiences of those involved, from leaders and decision makers to ordinary soldiers and civilians. This course will be heavily weighted towards the Vietnamese, providing perspectives often overlooked or marginalized in American histories of the war.

 

ANT 3085 CTRA - The US-Mexico Border: A Political Strategy and a Cultural The course examines the US-Mexico borderlands as a historical, political, racial and cultural construction, and as a strategy for forgoing new identities. The course addresses the issues of violence, human rights violations, corporate transnationalism and globalization, through historical and literary texts, border art, film and other media.

 

ART 3041 FMW – Three-Dimensional Digital Design
This course examines the creation of three-dimensional forms (including construction, rendering, and output) using digital tools. Investigation of the fundamental principles of three-dimensional design (line-plane-volume-mass-space-light). Applied study of computer-aided design (CAD) programs and rapid prototyping (RP) technologies for three-dimensional visualization. Readings, case studies, and hands-on projects emphasize the development of critical skills and their application to design issues of the present. Potential applications for packaging, product, and industrial design as well as architecture, art, and new media. This course is cross-referenced with NMA 3041.

 

COM 4101 CMWA - Contemporary Issues in Digital Media
This course offers students a survey of topics and issues surrounding digital media. The first half of the course provides an introductory informative and historical perspectives on today’s digital media platforms, from the Internet to Facebook, Twitter, Wikipedia and Google. Through analysis and critical discussions, we aim to discuss the ways each of these technologies changes our understanding of what media are. The second half of the course examines the literature engaging the impact of these technologies across a wide array of issues, including: technopobia, privacy, data mining, digital activism, freedom and diversity of expression, hacking and more. Course materials are drawn from various academic fields spanning law, internet studies, globalization and social theory. The overall aim of the course is to provide a critical media literacy for students through the development of the necessary lexicon and critical framework than can aid them in thinking about these crucial developments and issues that redefine how we understand media and communications.

 

COM 4101 CTRA – Race, Ethnicity, Gender in Communication
The goal of this course is to foster critical understanding of the representation of cultures in media and communication.  Students will analyze visual and textual mass communication as well as interpersonal interactions in order to determine how gender, race, ethnicity, and other facets of culture appear and are negotiated within communicative contexts.  Class themes include the relationship of communication to cultural norms, the social construction of difference, the implications of mediated cultural metaphors and stereotypes, and the consequences of the underrepresentation of some cultural groups in mass media.  Course materials will include both scholarly and popular texts; students will engage with a range of readings from the humanities and social sciences, and with cultural narratives that appear within films, television, advertising, journalism, and social media.

 

COM 4101 DMWA – Organizations in Internal Development
This course examines the theoretical frameworks, empirical case studies, and cutting-edge debates concerning organizations in international development. The course will be divided into three parts. First, we will explore the theoretical perspectives in International Development and Organizational Communication scholarship to understand inter- and intra-organizational communication. Second, using theoretical texts, social media, films, and organization publications, we will explore the ways that organizations have conceptualized and implemented international development projects. Third, each student will select an organization working in one or more of the various fields of international development including economic development, environmental protection, market regulation, security, democratization, and human rights. Each student will then write a short case study of their chosen organization that applies course concepts to in instance of inter-or intra-organizational communication.

 By reflecting on both the transformative potentials and limitations of organizations working in international development, this course addresses the following questions: How do international development organizations differ from other organizations? How do international development organizations foster development initiatives and goals? What role do international development organizations play in global politics? How do international development organizations identify and shape interests and identities? Why do international development organizations fail? How have communication scholars analyzed and participated in international development organizations?

 

COM 4101 FMWA – Leadership and Organizations
This course is about effective and ineffective leadership.  Using narratives -- fiction, films, and history -- it will explore ways leaders can inspire and guide their organizations, cope with competing interests and conflicting values, and maintain their energy and integrity.  It will ask how power and authority are best acquired, how and why they are so often abused, and how supporters and even opponents can shape what leaders do.

 

COM 4101 FTRA – Media Relations

COM 4101 UMA – Markets, Media and Meaning
This course examines the economy as a process of communication. In particular, we will explore the ways economic interactions rely on key principles, strategies, forms, and media of communication, as well as how economic activity itself produces meanings central to our social life and cultural experience. To do this, we will read influential works in economic theory, sociology, history, and criticism, as well as consider documentary and fiction films, TV programs and current public debates on a range of economic issues. Assignments will likely include reflective and analytical writing, as well as a creative group project designed to encourage students to engage critically with the arguments, practices and media narratives that comprise economic communication.

 

COM 4900 AMWA – Studies in Language and Social Interaction
This course introduces an ethnographic approach to language and interpersonal communication. Such an approach tries to understand the bases for social relations and social interaction based on the observation of, and the participation in, actual instances of interpersonal communication. Concerns of face, speech acts, person-referring forms, terms for talk, relational dialectics, narrative, and rules and norms are introduced as theoretical frameworks for the analysis of interpersonal communication. We will turn our attention to moments of intercultural communication since different cultural communicative patterns for interpersonal communication are active there. These often result in miscommunication, negative stereotyping, injustices, discrimination, and the like.

 

COM 4900 CMWA – Research Strategies in Communication
This class explores quantitative research methodology and its possibilities for creating insights into the study of communication. Throughout class and lab deliberations you should be asking this question: How do issues of research and methodology connect with the real world issues I confront in processes of intrapersonal communication, interpersonal communication, small group communication, mass mediated communication, public communication, and intercultural communication? To begin, some general orientations to research methodology within the discipline of communication studies will be discussed. The overall organization gives special attention to techniques of quantitative data analysis and asks: how are interpretive claims theoretically guided and formulated on the basis of empirical data? Whether you are, or hope to be working in a communication related industry, you will need to be competent and professional consumers and creators of information. Data analysis is the art of examining, summarizing, and drawing conclusions from data. Within the discipline of communication studies, knowing the right questions to ask, and how to best answer them, are important features of this research process.

 

COM 4900 DMWA – Conflict Resolution
This course explores conflict resolution in interpersonal, intergroup, intercultural, and international communication. Topics include theories of conflict, types and sources of conflict, strategies and tactics of conflict resolution, alternative dispute resolution, conflict resolution coaching, and problem– solving techniques.

The course is designed to provide a theoretical foundation as well as practices in how to apply the covered methods to a variety of personal and professional contexts. The course serves as a capstone for corporate communication minors; majors are also invited.

 

COM 4900 EMWA – Conflict Resolution
This course explores conflict resolution in interpersonal, intergroup, intercultural, and international communication. Topics include theories of conflict, types and sources of conflict, strategies and tactics of conflict resolution, alternative dispute resolution, conflict resolution coaching, and problem– solving techniques.

The course is designed to provide a theoretical foundation as well as practices in how to apply the covered methods to a variety of personal and professional contexts. The course serves as a capstone for corporate communication minors; majors are also invited.

 

COM 4900 FMWA – Ethics of Professional Communication
This course explores the philosophical and ethical issues related to the practice of professional communication. Class topics encourage the consideration of questions of ethics and values that are likely to arise for professional communicators in the course of their careers. Readings for the course establish an interdisciplinary foundation for exploring these questions, drawing on the disciplines of philosophy, rhetoric, psychology, and communication. The global goal of the course is to motivate individual and collective commitment to best practices.

 

COM 4900 FTRA – Internal Communication
This capstone course introduces the role and value of strategic internal communication within today’s global business organizations and reviews the evolution of the practice from a one-way mode of communication to a valuable, strategic business function impacting organizational effectiveness. Special topics in internal communication will be explored, such as internal branding, the CEO’s role in the internal communications process, the importance of research as the foundation for communications strategy development, and effective methods of communicating with employees during change situations. We will also discuss challenges and issues communicators face in trying to reach employees at all levels and examine strategies and tools for developing a united, engaged and productive workforce. Throughout the course, we’ll read and discuss articles, research reports and case studies that support our understanding and application of strategic internal communication. You will apply what you’ve learned to independent and group projects. Several practicing internal communication professionals will also be speaking with us to bridge classroom and workplace practice.

COM 4900 UMA – Communicating as a Situational Leader
This course is designed to close the skills gap in leadership and communication identified by employers in the past few years. Students will learn about several leadership, interpersonal and group communication theories while practicing how to communicate as a leader in various situations. While we will study several leadership theories, the main focus of the course will be to master situational leadership theory from a communication perspective. Students will have an opportunity to compare and contrast aspects of the theories while also applying what they've learned to various workplace settings. 

 

COM 4900 URA – Workplace Dispute Resolution
 This course explores conflict resolution in interpersonal, intergroup, intercultural, and international communication. Topics include theories of conflict, types and sources of conflict, strategies and tactics of conflict resolution, alternative dispute resolution, conflict resolution coaching, and problem– solving techniques.  he course is designed to provide a theoretical foundation as well as practices in how to apply the covered methods to a variety of personal and professional contexts. The course serves as a capstone for corporate communication minors; majors are also invited.

 

ENG 3610 NW – Narrative Fiction: Making the Reader Believe
Stories are everywhere -- stories about our dreams, our origins, our loved ones, our enemies. We tell stories about what we believe; what we remember; what we want to remember; and what we want to forget. We tell stories in order to make people know what we know.  We retell stories to perfect them, emphasizing this detail, dropping that one—always we try to create the rhythm of language at its best, narrative poetry that sings strongly enough to catch the attention and the fascination of our readers. Tell a true story as if you made it up. Tell a fiction as if it absolutely happened. That’s the secret of great story telling.  Make the audience believe. In the course of this workshop you will be asked to not only write your own stories but to create a list that demonstrates what comprise a good story, a bad story, and finally a great story.

IN ORDER TO REGISTER FOR THIS COURSE, STUDENTS MUST SUBMIT AN APPLICATION BY WEDNESDAY, MARCH 26TH. AVAILABLE ON THE HARMAN WRITER-IN-RESIDENCE PROGRAM WEBSITE: http://www.baruch.cuny.edu/wsas/harman. For questions, contact PROF. BRIDGETT DAVIS, RM VC 7-265(PHONE: 646-312-3927 OR EMAIL: Bridgett.davis@baruch.cuny.edu).

 

ENG 3610H NWH – Honors- Narrative Fiction: Making the Reader Believe
Stories are everywhere -- stories about our dreams, our origins, our loved ones, our enemies. We tell stories about what we believe; what we remember; what we want to remember; and what we want to forget. We tell stories in order to make people know what we know.  We retell stories to perfect them, emphasizing this detail, dropping that one—always we try to create the rhythm of language at its best, narrative poetry that sings strongly enough to catch the attention and the fascination of our readers. Tell a true story as if you made it up. Tell a fiction as if it absolutely happened. That’s the secret of great story telling.  Make the audience believe. In the course of this workshop you will be asked to not only write your own stories but to create a list that demonstrates what comprise a good story, a bad story, and finally a great story.

IN ORDER TO REGISTER FOR THIS COURSE, STUDENTS MUST SUBMIT AN APPLICATION BY WEDNESDAY, MARCH 26TH. AVAILABLE ON THE HARMAN WRITER-IN-RESIDENCE PROGRAM WEBSITE: http://www.baruch.cuny.edu/wsas/harman. For questions, contact PROF. BRIDGETT DAVIS, RM VC 7-265(PHONE: 646-312-3927 OR EMAIL: Bridgett.davis@baruch.cuny.edu).

 

ENG 3940 CMWA - Film and Politics
Since its inception, film has been used to set political agendas, advocate policies, and influence political socialization. It has both challenged and upheld traditional values and institutions. In this course, we will examine a number of global political issues by discussing how they have been explored in contemporary motion pictures. We will focus specifically on three topics—crime, capitalism, and war—while also highlighting some differences in the treatment of topics between US and foreign movies. We will closely examine the ideas embedded in each of these films and also the techniques film directors and writers use to convey their messages. Students will also be exposed to key readings by literary authors, journalists, and social scientists on the political issues raised by the films shown in class.

 

ENG 3950 CTRA - Disability and Global Culture
From Sophocles’ classic play Philoctetes to James Cameron’s blockbuster movie Avatar, from Pete Townsend’s rock opera Tommy to José Saramago’s apocalyptic fiction Blindness, from Kenzaburō Ōe’s family story A Personal Matter to Indra Sinha’s polemical novel Animal’s People, global literature, drama, and film have often turned to the challenges confronting protagonists with disabilities. How are people with disabilities represented, and how do those representations change across culture and time? What do these stories tell us about the societies in which they take place? What is the function of melodrama, gothic, satire, tragedy, or romance in these narratives? This course provides an introduction to the growing field of disability studies, and draws not only on cultural productions but also on neuroscience, abnormal psychology, and anthropology. Topics will include: soldiers wounded and/or traumatized in combat; cognitive and physical disabilities; race, eugenics, and Nazism; autism and schizophrenia; activism; and the wide array of philosophical and ethical questions addressed by texts with disabled characters. Students should be prepared for active and thoughtful discussion. Assignments will include: a class presentation; two essays; a midterm and a take-home final examination

 

ENG 3950 PMWA - Zones of Hell: Dante’s Inferno and Levi’s Auschwitz
Dante went to Hell figuratively on his way to Paradise, guided by a divine presence that gave meaning to his experience. Levi actually went to hell in person, with little hope to survive, no superior guidance, no hope to reach paradise. In Dante’s Inferno punishments are meted out for specific sins; in Auschwitz the only ‘sin’ to be punished is that of being a Jew. In Dante’s hell the sinners retain their individuality, in the Camp the prisoners were deprived of their identity and dehumanized before their extermination. Yet Levi survived his time in hell on earth, and he, like Dante, writes about it. We will read selections from Dante’s Inferno, and Levi’s Survival in Auschwitz and The Drowned and the Saved, comparing their attitudes towards justice, the zone between good and evil, the operation of memory for the victims and the oppressors, and the new moral universe we inhabit after Auschwitz.

 

ENG 3950H CTRH - Disability and Global Culture
From Sophocles’ classic play Philoctetes to James Cameron’s blockbuster movie Avatar, from Pete Townsend’s rock opera Tommy to José Saramago’s apocalyptic fiction Blindness, from Kenzaburō Ōe’s family story A Personal Matter to Indra Sinha’s polemical novel Animal’s People, global literature, drama, and film have often turned to the challenges confronting protagonists with disabilities. How are people with disabilities represented, and how do those representations change across culture and time? What do these stories tell us about the societies in which they take place? What is the function of melodrama, gothic, satire, tragedy, or romance in these narratives? This course provides an introduction to the growing field of disability studies, and draws not only on cultural productions but also on neuroscience, abnormal psychology, and anthropology. Topics will include: soldiers wounded and/or traumatized in combat; cognitive and physical disabilities; race, eugenics, and Nazism; autism and schizophrenia; activism; and the wide array of philosophical and ethical questions addressed by texts with disabled characters. Students should be prepared for active and thoughtful discussion. Assignments will include: a class presentation; two essays; a midterm and a take-home final examination.

 

HIS 3460 BMWA – World War II
This course examines the most destructive war in the history of mankind, a conflict that cost more than 55 million lives, brought about a fundamental restructuring of global affairs, hastened the decline of European influence in the world, and precipitated the growth of American and Soviet power that shaped global affairs for the remainder of the twentieth century.  Tracing cause-and-effect relationships that led to the outbreak of global conflict in 1939-1941, it examines the origins of World War II in the larger context of European, American, and Asian history since 1918. It also explores controversies among historians who have offered a variety of different (and sometimes conflicting) interpretations of the war’s origins and its ultimate outcome. In addition to advanced secondary sources, students will read a variety of primary documents, reconstruct their meanings and biases, develop their context, and utilize them to explain key events and developments of World War II.

 

HIS 3460 MFA – History of Food in America
From E. coli, mad cow disease, and salmonella; obesity, heart disease, and diabetes; pesticides and persistent toxins; GMOs and cloning; organic, free-range, all-natural, and conventional, the current politics of food and agriculture in the United States seem uniquely complicated.  This class examines the history of food production and consumption in the U.S. in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Over the course of the semester we will trace major changes in agricultural production and transport, shifts in food marketing, purveyance, and regulation, and the evolution of the American diet.  In addition, we will explore how these national and global developments have transformed local food supplies, markets and consumption habits in New York City We will end the class by analyzing current debates about food production and consumption and how these have debates are reflected in the ever-changing food culture of New York City. 

 

HIS 3860 EMWA – Encounters in Global Ancient Empires
Empires extend their dominion over populations that are culturally and ethnically distinct from the center of power, and ancient empires embody this expansive control in revealing ways. Rather than glossing over these complexities, this course explores these differences through a wide range in evidence, including historical texts, archaeological remains, and visual material. Course readings will draw upon recent theories of empires, globalization, colonialism, and creolization in order to illustrate the contradictions, paradoxes, and conflicts of power that we find when cultures collide. We will use these theories compare and contrast ancient world civilizations such as Rome, Egypt, Mesopotamia, Persia, and the Aztecs with one another and with modern perspectives upon imperialism and globalization. Each student will pick a particular civilization of interest to them from a list provided. The student will follow this civilization throughout the term and contribute their perspective on their chosen empire to classroom discussions. We will use these competing perspectives to examine the often-contradictory ways in which local areas and individuals examine themselves, their families, gender, ethnicity, and community while under imperial control. The course assessment will consist of one formal presentation to the class, critical book and article reviews, and a final research paper focused upon the empire chosen by the student.

 

HIS 3860 ETRA – The Vietnam War
Most Americans remember the Vietnam War through a small yet emotionally-charged set of images: films such as Apocalypse Now and Platoon; photographs of self-immolating monks and peasant girls burned by napalm; long-haired youth protesting in Washington; a low, black marble wall with names carved side by side.  However, this is only one side of history.  What the Vietnamese remember as the “American War” had deeper and more terrible legacies than most Americans know.  It was a war that regions, villages, and even families fought against and within one another, for complex historical, political, and cultural reasons that defy Cold War caricatures.  This course will explore the Second Indochina War, known in the US as the “Vietnam War” and in Vietnam as the “American War”.  The objectives of this course are twofold: first, to introduce students to the historical context of the Vietnam War, a major episode in the 20th century histories of both the United States and Vietnam, and second, to integrate the experiences and perspectives of various participants in the war.  We will be analyzing a number of different sources (including fiction, film, memoirs, and photography) to explore the experiences of those involved, from leaders and decision makers to ordinary soldiers and civilians. This course will be heavily weighted towards the Vietnamese, providing perspectives often overlooked or marginalized in American histories of the war.

 

IDC 4050H CMWH – Soundtracks:  History and its Music in Modern America

Carol Berkin, Dept. of History 
Liz Wollman, Dept. of Fine and Performing Arts (Music)

This course examines the development of American popular music through the prism of history. It focuses on both stylistic developments and the historical context in which music such as the blues, folk, soul, rock, disco, punk, alternative rock and rap evolved in the second half of the 20th century. The connection between popular styles and the changing notions of race, gender and social class as well as the impact music has had on American social and political history will be explored.

IDC 4050H CTRH – Remembering the Great War, 1914-2014
Digirolamo, Vincent, Dept. of History
Pence, Katherine, Dept. of History

This class takes the hundredth anniversary of the outbreak of World War I as an opportunity to explore the geopolitical forces that pitched dozens of nations across the globe into a four-year maelstrom of death and destruction, shaking the very foundations of western civilization. It will explore the causes, conduct, and consequences of the war, including its social and psychological impact on ordinary citizens, both soldiers and civilians, and its cultural influence on artists, writers, poets, composers, and filmmakers. The course will pay close attention to commemorative events and works newly produced by publishers, orchestras, museums, and periodicals. Our aim is to gain a deeper understanding of war, peace, imperialism, propaganda, modernity, and memory.

 

IDC4050H NRH – Utopias/Dystopias
David Hoffman, School of Public Affairs (Communications)
Douglas Muzzio, School of Public Affairs (Political Science)

As H.G. Wells said in a 1939 radio address, “Throughout the ages…Utopias reflect the anxieties and discontents amidst which they are produced.”  To study the history of utopian and dystopian thought is to study the hopes and fears that have driven revolution, reform, and social and political innovation for millennia.  Through the study of utopian literature and practice, this course will explore issues in governance, economics, human rights, and sustainability, as well as examine fundamental questions about human nature and happiness.  We will explore these issues in utopian and dystopian literary works, such as Plato’s Republic, Gilman’s Herland, Zamyatin’s We, Callenbach’s Ecotopia, and LeGuin’s The Dispossessed.  We will also study utopian and dystopian themes in film and music, as well as actual attempts to create utopian societies, especially on the small scale.  Students will be encouraged to see works of literature and experiments in the utopian tradition as taking part in an ongoing conversation about how to organize a fulfilling and sustainable life.

 

JRN 3610 NW –   Narrative Fiction: Making the Reader Believe
Stories are everywhere -- stories about our dreams, our origins, our loved ones, our enemies. We tell stories about what we believe; what we remember; what we want to remember; and what we want to forget. We tell stories in order to make people know what we know.  We retell stories to perfect them, emphasizing this detail, dropping that one—always we try to create the rhythm of language at its best, narrative poetry that sings strongly enough to catch the attention and the fascination of our readers. Tell a true story as if you made it up. Tell a fiction as if it absolutely happened. That’s the secret of great story telling.  Make the audience believe. In the course of this workshop you will be asked to not only write your own stories but to create a list that demonstrates what comprise a good story, a bad story, and finally a great story.

IN ORDER TO REGISTER FOR THIS COURSE, STUDENTS MUST SUBMIT AN APPLICATION BY WEDNESDAY, MARCH 26TH. AVAILABLE ON THE HARMAN WRITER-IN-RESIDENCE PROGRAM WEBSITE: http://www.baruch.cuny.edu/wsas/harman. For questions, contact PROF. BRIDGETT DAVIS, RM VC 7-265(PHONE: 646-312-3927 OR EMAIL: Bridgett.davis@baruch.cuny.edu).

 

JRN 3610H NWH –   Honors- Narrative Fiction: Making the Reader Believe
Stories are everywhere -- stories about our dreams, our origins, our loved ones, our enemies. We tell stories about what we believe; what we remember; what we want to remember; and what we want to forget. We tell stories in order to make people know what we know.  We retell stories to perfect them, emphasizing this detail, dropping that one—always we try to create the rhythm of language at its best, narrative poetry that sings strongly enough to catch the attention and the fascination of our readers. Tell a true story as if you made it up. Tell a fiction as if it absolutely happened. That’s the secret of great story telling.  Make the audience believe. In the course of this workshop you will be asked to not only write your own stories but to create a list that demonstrates what comprise a good story, a bad story, and finally a great story.

IN ORDER TO REGISTER FOR THIS COURSE, STUDENTS MUST SUBMIT AN APPLICATION BY WEDNESDAY, MARCH 26TH. AVAILABLE ON THE HARMAN WRITER-IN-RESIDENCE PROGRAM WEBSITE: http://www.baruch.cuny.edu/wsas/harman. For questions, contact PROF. BRIDGETT DAVIS, RM VC 7-265(PHONE: 646-312-3927 OR EMAIL: Bridgett.davis@baruch.cuny.edu).

 

JWS 3950 BTRA - History of the Jewish People in America
Examines the major political, social, economic, and cultural developments from the colonial beginnings to the present. Priority is given to examining the American Jewish experience in its American historical context.

LTS 3085 CTRA - The US-Mexico Border: A Political Strategy and a Cultural Construction
The course examines the US-Mexico borderlands as a historical, political, racial and cultural construction, and as a strategy for forgoing new identities. The course addresses the issues of violence, human rights violations, corporate transnationalism and globalization, through historical and literary texts, border art, film and other media.

 

NMA 3041 FMW – Three-Dimensional Digital Design
This course examines the creation of three-dimensional forms (including construction, rendering, and output) using digital tools. Investigation of the fundamental principles of three-dimensional design (line-plane-volume-mass-space-light). Applied study of computer-aided design (CAD) programs and rapid prototyping (RP) technologies for three-dimensional visualization. Readings, case studies, and hands-on projects emphasize the development of critical skills and their application to design issues of the present. Potential applications for packaging, product, and industrial design as well as architecture, art, and new media. This course is cross-referenced with NMA 3041.

 

PSY 3043 CTRA – Disability and Global Culture
From Sophocles’ classic play Philoctetes to James Cameron’s blockbuster movie Avatar, from Pete Townsend’s rock opera Tommy to José Saramago’s apocalyptic fiction Blindness, from Kenzaburō Ōe’s family story A Personal Matter to Indra Sinha’s polemical novel Animal’s People, global literature, drama, and film have often turned to the challenges confronting protagonists with disabilities. How are people with disabilities represented, and how do those representations change across culture and time? What do these stories tell us about the societies in which they take place? What is the function of melodrama, gothic, satire, tragedy, or romance in these narratives? This course provides an introduction to the growing field of disability studies, and draws not only on cultural productions but also on neuroscience, abnormal psychology, and anthropology. Topics will include: soldiers wounded and/or traumatized in combat; cognitive and physical disabilities; race, eugenics, and Nazism; autism and schizophrenia; activism; and the wide array of philosophical and ethical questions addressed by texts with disabled characters. Students should be prepared for active and thoughtful discussion. Assignments will include: a class presentation; two essays; a midterm and a take-home final examination.

 

PSY 3043H CTRH - Disability and Global Culture
From Sophocles’ classic play Philoctetes to James Cameron’s blockbuster movie Avatar, from Pete Townsend’s rock opera Tommy to José Saramago’s apocalyptic fiction Blindness, from Kenzaburō Ōe’s family story A Personal Matter to Indra Sinha’s polemical novel Animal’s People, global literature, drama, and film have often turned to the challenges confronting protagonists with disabilities. How are people with disabilities represented, and how do those representations change across culture and time? What do these stories tell us about the societies in which they take place? What is the function of melodrama, gothic, satire, tragedy, or romance in these narratives? This course provides an introduction to the growing field of disability studies, and draws not only on cultural productions but also on neuroscience, abnormal psychology, and anthropology. Topics will include: soldiers wounded and/or traumatized in combat; cognitive and physical disabilities; race, eugenics, and Nazism; autism and schizophrenia; activism; and the wide array of philosophical and ethical questions addressed by texts with disabled characters. Students should be prepared for active and thoughtful discussion. Assignments will include: a class presentation; two essays; a midterm and a take-home final examination.

 

SOC 3085 CTRA - Special Topics: The US-Mexico Border: A Political Strategy and a Cultural Construction
The course examines the US-Mexico borderlands as a historical, political, racial and cultural construction, and as a strategy for forgoing new identities. The course addresses the issues of violence, human rights violations, corporate transnationalism and globalization, through historical and literary texts, border art, film and other media.

 

WSM 4900 CTR – Women in America
A historical analysis of the social, political, and economic roles of women in American society; an examination of the ideologies, customs, and laws that legitimated their status within that society; and an exploration into the self-image of American women. Emphasis will be placed upon significant women's movements, especially the nineteenth-century suffrage movement and the disparate twentieth-century liberation movements.


The City University of New York