Fall 2012 – Special Topics

ANT 3085 MFA — Sociology of the Internet
This course will examine how the Internet and its related new information and communication technologies has transformed society with particular emphasis on issues of (1) access and inequality (the “digital divide”), (2) political participation and civil society (the “dictator’s dilemma”), (3) freedom of speech, e-commerce, intellectual property, and the telecommunications industry (“net neutrality”), (4) social interaction and virtual communities, and (5) culture, creativity, and entertainment. While the emergence of the Internet may seem uniquely revolutionary in how it alters social life, each previous innovation in information and communication technology during the 20th century (telephone, radio, film, and television) also changed society in fundamental ways. We will view the emergence of the Internet as part of that history.

ART 3041 VM — Packaging: Designing for Three Dimensions
This course introduces the student to package design which presents unique possibilities and problems for the designer. The course will explore three-dimensional visual impact through color, image, type design, materials, etc. Projects may range from Big Box items to food and cosmetics packaging.

BLS 3085 EMWA — Race and Gender in Contemporary Brazil
This course examines the role and tensions of gender, ethnicity and class issues between peoples and cultures in Brazil today. By reviewing a wide range of the country’s cultural and artistic production, such as music, film, literature, politics and sports, as well as significant historical events and personalities, the challenges of a multicultural society will be explored.

BLS 3085 PTR — History of Caribbean Civilizations
A general overview of both the unity and diversity of the Caribbean region. This strategic area of the world is studied in its successive historical phases: from its indigenous origins to the formation of Spanish, English, French, Dutch, and Danish colonial and plantation societies and the twentieth-century creation of modern nations and commonwealth territories at the doorsteps of the United States.

BLS 3085 UWA — The Politics of Black America
A survey of the major political issues, figures and movements in the history of Black America, along with an examination of the challenges facing the African American community today, and a thoroughgoing examination of the question of whether or not we are now in, or moving toward, a post-racial America.

COM 4101 BMWA — Introduction to Communication Studies
This is an introductory course that surveys the basic principles and skills of human communication. The goal of the course is to help create good communicators who are skilled in their construction, presentation, understanding and evaluation of messages, and who also have the knowledge and willingness to take responsibility for their communication behaviors. The course is divided into three units: 1) Foundations of Communication presents a theoretical model of communication and discusses the construction of the self and identity through communication, the role of perception in the communication process, the importance of listening, and the effective use of verbal and nonverbal messages; 2) Communication in Context explores communication in interpersonal relationships, small groups, and the media; and 3) Public Communication describes the process of planning, preparing, and presenting a public speech.

COM 4101 ETRA — Diversity and Leadership
What is diversity and inclusion? What is leadership? What happens when you end up blending both of them together? These are the questions that we’ll address this semester in COM 4101. Over the past few decades, this country and organizations have seen a huge shift in how we look at groups and the workplace. Our workplaces are complex, diverse and less traditional. There are several generations working in one place; more women are in the workplace; we work with people next to us and also across the world; technology has changed how we do business. So how do we prepare for this complex system?

In this course, students are encouraged to use lessons learned in other courses. The underlying concept is that there are always different ways to approach a task. During this term students will have opportunities to look at how strong leaders communicate; how to ensure that all individuals are fully included in the workplace.

COM 4101 PMWA — Virtual Teamwork
This course covers theories and methodologies of virtual teamwork. The course is a hybrid course (50% face to face, 50% online). Topics include types of online teams, virtual team cohesiveness, issues related to communicating across cultures and international boundaries, and virtual team problem solving. The course applies the principles of communication to online environments. Both asynchronous and synchronous communication technology will be explored (including virtual video meeting tools). Students will have opportunities to utilize collaboration technologies in virtual teams. To participate in this course, students need access to a computer with video and audio capability.

COM 4101 RTRA — Contemporary Issues in Digital Media
This course offers students a survey of topics and issues surrounding digital media. The first half of the course provides an introductory informative and historical perspectives on today's digital media platforms, from the Internet to Facebook, Twitter, Wikipedia and Google. Through analysis and critical discussions, we aim to discuss the ways each of these technologies changes our understanding of what media are. The second half of the course examines the literature engaging the impact of these technologies across a wide array of issues, including: technopobia, privacy, data mining, digital activism, freedom and diversity of expression, hacking and more. Course materials are drawn from various academic fields spanning law, internet studies, globalization and social theory. The overall aim of the course is to provide a critical media literacy for students through the development of the necessary lexicon and critical framework than can aid them in thinking about these crucial developments and issues that redefine how we understand media and communications.

COM 4900 AMWA — Communication Research Strategies
This class explores quantitative research methodology and its possibilities for creating insights into the study of communication. Throughout class and lab deliberations you should be asking this question: How do issues of research and methodology connect with the real world issues I confront in processes of intrapersonal communication, interpersonal communication, small group communication, mass mediated communication, public communication, and intercultural communication? To begin, some general orientations to research methodology within the discipline of communication studies will be discussed. The overall organization gives special attention to techniques of quantitative data analysis and asks: how are interpretive claims theoretically guided and formulated on the basis of empirical data? Whether you are, or hope to be working in a communication related industry, you will need to be competent and professional consumers and creators of information. Data analysis is the art of examining, summarizing, and drawing conclusions from data. Within the discipline of communication studies, knowing the right questions to ask, and how to best answer them, are important features of this research process.

COM 4900 CMWA — Studies in Language and Social Interaction

COM 4900 FTRA — Internal Communication
This course introduces students to the role and value of strategic internal communications within today’s global business organizations. The course reviews the evolution of the practice from a one-way internal communications model to a valuable, strategic business function impacting organizational effectiveness. Special topics in internal communications will be explored, such as internal branding, the CEO’s role in the internal communications process, the importance of research as the foundation for communications strategy development, and effective methods of communicating with employees during change situations. We will also discuss challenges and issues communicators face in trying to reach employees at all levels and examine strategies and tools for developing a united, engaged and productive workforce.

COM 4900 PMWA — Conflict Resolution
This course explores conflict resolution in interpersonal, intergroup, intercultural, and international communication. Topics include causes and manifestations of conflict, the concept of emotional intelligence, effects of violence in the media, interpersonal conflict resolution techniques, non-violence and peace education, sources of intercultural conflict and intercultural conflict management styles, as well as current international conflicts and resolution efforts.

COM 4900 PTRA — Conflict Resolution
This course explores conflict resolution in interpersonal, intergroup, intercultural, and international communication. Topics include causes and manifestations of conflict, the concept of emotional intelligence, effects of violence in the media, interpersonal conflict resolution techniques, non-violence and peace education, sources of intercultural conflict and intercultural conflict management styles, as well as current international conflicts and resolution efforts.

COM 4900 UTA — Communication and the Human Community
This course is an introduction to the important concepts and principles of human communication, with a focus on how humans create meaningful worlds to live in through shared language, shared visual perception and interaction processes. Examination of the conflicts and opportunities that can result from communication differences within and among communities, with particular emphasis on gender, race and ethnicity, age, sexual orientation, class and physical ability.

COM 9660 UTA — Corporate Representation in Film, TV, Advertising, and New Media
This course critically explores how corporations and the people who work in them have been represented in film, television, advertising and new media and what corporate communication specialists can learn from this rich visual history. We begin with some of the earliest cinematic representations of business, including Employees Leaving the Lumière Factory (1895), A Corner in Wheat (1912), King Vidor’s The Crowd (1928), Strike (Sergei Eisenstein, 1925), Modern Times (1936), The Man in the Gray Flannel Suit (1956), Wall Street (1987), Office Space (1999), Boiler Room (2000), The Apartment (1960), Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps (2010), and Margin Call (2011). In the case of non-fiction films such as The Corporation (2003), Capitalism: A Love Story (2009), Enron, The Smartest Guys in the Room (2005) and Inside Job (2010), we will consider how documentary representations serve the dual function of being both whistle blowers and flame fanners. From the world of television we will examine such examples as Patterns, The Office (BBC and NBC), and Mad Men (AMC). Case studies from new media include and fan-based corporate web pages, blogs, and social media. No previous background in film studies is necessary, although students will be required to pre-screen certain films (available streaming via Baruch library’s website) prior to the class meeting. Course readings will integrate film, visual, cultural, and corporate communication studies theory. Assignments include close textual analysis of screenings, in-class presentations, take-home midterm, and a final-15 page research paper.

ENG 3610 NW — Workshop: Fiction Writing
SECTION NW a special workshop in fiction writing will be taught by the Fall 2012 Harman Visiting Writer Katherine Vaz, whose award-winning books including Saudade, Mariana, and Our Lady of the Artichokes, have been translated into several languages. Vaz has been cited as the first Portuguese-American to break into mainstream publishing. Particularly welcome will be writers wishing to explore how to look forward in their cultural explorations, rather than exclusively backward to immigrant patterns or histories; who you are as a first, second, or third generation American can contribute to the new literary landscape. Authors read might include T Cooper, Gabriel Gárcia Márquez, George Saunders, ZZ Packer, Bharati Mukherjee, and James Purdy. IN ORDER TO REGISTER FOR THIS COURSE, STUDENTS MUST SUBMIT AN ONLINE APPLICATION BY MARCH 22ND ON THE HARMAN WEBSITE:
WWW.BARUCH.CUNY.EDU/WSAS/HARMAN. For questions, contact PROF. ROSLYN BERNSTEIN, RM VC 7-270 (PHONE: 646-312-3930 OR E-MAIL: Roslyn.Bernstein@BARUCH.CUNY.EDU)

ENG 3610H NWH — Honors Workshop: Fiction Writing
SECTION NWH a special honors workshop in fiction writing will be taught by the by the Fall 2012 Harman Visiting Writer Katherine Vaz, whose award-winning books including Saudade, Mariana, and Our Lady of the Artichokes, have been translated into several languages. Vaz has been cited as the first Portuguese-American to break into mainstream publishing. Particularly welcome will be writers wishing to explore how to look forward in their cultural explorations, rather than exclusively backward to immigrant patterns or histories; who you are as a first, second, or third generation American can contribute to the new literary landscape. Authors read might include T Cooper, Gabriel Gárcia Márquez, George Saunders, ZZ Packer, Bharati Mukherjee, and James Purdy. IN ORDER TO REGISTER FOR THIS COURSE, STUDENTS MUST SUBMIT AN ONLINE APPLICATION BY MARCH 22ND ON THE HARMAN WEBSITE:
WWW.BARUCH.CUNY.EDU/WSAS/HARMAN. For questions, contact PROF. ROSLYN BERNSTEIN, RM VC 7-270 (PHONE: 646-312-3930 OR E-MAIL: Roslyn.Bernstein@BARUCH.CUNY.EDU)
THIS HONORS COURSE IN FICTION WRITING IS OPEN TO STUDENTS IN AN OFFICIAL HONORS PROGRAM AND TO OTHER QUALIFIED STUDENTS WITH AN OVERALL 3.4 GPA. SEE HONORS PROGRAM INFORMATION IN THIS SCHEDULE. PREREQ: ENG 2150 OR THE EQUIVALENT AND DEPARTMENT PERMISSION ONLY; OPEN ONLY TO PROGRAM CODE-J CLOSED TO GRADUATE STUDENTS PROGRAM CODE H OR GPA 3.4H

ENG 3940 CTRA — Film and the Holocaust
This course considers how film was used both by the Third Reich as a propaganda tool and subsequently to represent the Holocaust. We will explore a number of film genres and discuss how the act of filming, the editing of a film, the imagery itself, and the role of the audience affect the meaning and reception of the work.

ENG 3950 CMWA — James Joyce
ReJoyce! An entire course devoted to the 20th-century Irish genius who defined literary modernism. He wrote the greatest novel of that century, Ulysses, as well as incomparable short stories, Dubliners, and the classic autobiographical but universal novel of childhood and adolescence, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man. We will read these works as well as sample Finnegans Wake, a text that uses words in unprecedented, entirely revolutionary ways, but that cannot be described, only experienced.

ENG 3950 FTRA — Literature and Politics
The poet Shelley made the extravagant claim that poets are “the unacknowledged legislators of the world,” that is, that literature had a powerful influence on politics. This class will focus on American, and 3rd World modern works addressing: empire and war, race, gender, and economic inequality and the struggles to change them. We will also look at visions of social transformation and dreams of an alternative society created by the literary imagination. Authors will include some of the following: memoir by a Vietnam vet , William Ehrhart; fiction which may include: Leslie Silko, Ceremony, Luis Rodriguez, Music of the Mill, Marge Piercy, Woman at the Edge of Time, Manilo Arqueta, One Day of Life, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Flannery O’Connor, Meridel Le Suer; poetry by Blake, Whitman, Neruda, Amiri Baraka, Langston Hughes, Marge Piercy, Allen Ginsberg, Robert Bly, the Last Poets, Spoken Word, political lyrics and films. Also since Occupy Wall Street has inspired many contemporary writers and artists to become engaged with the social movements, we will experience some of their efforts directly.

ENG 3950 NFA — Stephen Sondheim: Examining His Works
This class will examine Stephen Sondheim’s works, primarily between the years of 1954-1981. Through streaming and several visits to the New York Public Library for the Performing Arts, students will view six musicals Sondheim collaborated on. They are West Side Story, Gypsy, Company, Follies, A Little Night Music, and Sweeney Todd. Students will analyze, synthesize, and evaluate the lyrics to these shows which are included in the textbook, Finishing the Hat by Stephen Sondheim.

FLM 4900 FTRA — The Hollywood Western
Westerns are nearly as old as American cinema itself. They began with The Great Train Robbery (1903) and soon became a staple of the movie studios. Early Westerns focused on cowboys, gunslingers, lawmen, and outlaws of various kinds. Later Westerns featured the vast plains and deserts of America, the crude Western towns, and the battles with Indians (not yet called Native Americans). Heroes like Hoot Gibson and Tim McCoy developed heroic personas, and later movie stars like John Wayne got their start in “shoot-em-ups.” By 1939, directors such as John Ford created Westerns now considered art as well as entertainment. Ford, Howard Hawks, Anthony Mann, and other directors, perfected a style of shooting and editing Westerns that contributed to making these films complex explorations of human character and history. At the same time, the fable-like and melodramatic elements of the Western remained a constant feature of these productions. This course explores the classic age of the Western—from the silent era of the 1920s to the 1950s--but also more contemporary work that reflects on the Western genre. Among the films shown will be Stagecoach, Destry Rides Again, My Darling Clementine, Red River, Rio Bravo as well as spoofs of the Western such as Blazing Saddles and Support Your Local Sheriff! The core text for this course is The Western Reader [Paperback or Kindle Edition], edited by Gregg Rickman and Jim Kitses.

HSP 3085 CTRA — Lost in Translation: Latin America and the Truth Behind the Camera
In the field of history it is difficult to achieve objectivity, impartiality, integrity, and honesty. Favoritism, passion, injustice, and prejudice affect historical objectivity. There is a saying: “perception is reality”. How can we then speak of historical objectivity? Historical objectivity, in my opinion, is the basis of education. This semester I have decided to channel and explore Latin America history differently. Not through the eyes of the traditional historian, not through “official” documents, but from the view of the “popular historian,” who casts doubt on the official version of the facts and seeks the truth with new means at his/her disposal: cinematography.

The history of Latin America is the story of strife caused from the outside by various groups with economic interests in the region. This is a reality which has been present in the region since the day that Christopher Columbus knelt at the beaches of San Salvador. During the semester we will study films made by those who have dedicated their lives to the pursuit of hidden truths in the History of Latin America.

HSP 3085 EMWA — Race and Gender in Contemporary Brazil
This course examine the role and tensions of gender, ethnicity and class issues between peoples and cultures in Brazil today. By reviewing a wide range of the country’s cultural and artistic production, such as music, film, literature, politics and sports, as well as significant historical events and personalities, the challenges of a multicultural society will be explored.

HSP 3085 PTR — Topic: History of Caribbean Civilizations
A general overview of both the unity and diversity of the Caribbean region. This strategic area of the world is studied in its successive historical phases: from its indigenous origins to the formation of Spanish, English, French, Dutch, and Danish colonial and plantation societies and the twentieth-century creation of modern nations and commonwealth territories at the doorsteps of the United States.

HIS 3360 DWF — Revolutionary France
This course will cover the events of the French Revolution and the Napoleonic Empire, focusing on the French attempts to found a new government based on the principles of popular sovereignty and the rights of man. Particular attention will also be paid to the issues raised by the Revolution, including questions of representative democracy, human rights, the relation between warfare and politics, changes in political culture, revolutionary violence, and the legacy of the Revolution.

HIS 3460 FMW — The Sixties in America
This course explores the major cultural, social, and political contours of the 1960’s. Topics include the Civil Rights and Black Power movements, the rise of the New Left, the challenges and legacies of the Kennedy and Johnson Presidencies, the Cuban Missile Crisis and the Vietnam War, Second Wave Feminism and Movements built by women of color, the movements built by Chicanos and Puerto Ricans, the urban riots and the origins of the contemporary environmental movements, and the rise of the New Right. The course will focus on what social, political, and economic forces led to political crisis in the Sixties, how the experience of race, class and gender were redefined in the 60’s, and the relationship between formal government policies and social movements.

HIS 3460 PMW — Digital History
This course introduces students to theories and practices in the rapidly growing field of digital history. We will survey and evaluate emerging tools and methodologies used by historians in the realms of social media, data mining, archival studies, and public history. We will pay particularly close attention to the history of media in American politics, and examine how the use of digital tools in the 2012 presidential campaign informs our understandings of digital history. Students will have the opportunity to practice digital history as they conceive, design, and launch projects that collect, analyze, synthesize, and present new historical arguments.

IDC 4050H CTRH — Cancer Science, Cancer Culture
Co-taught by a biologist and a journalist, this seminar will introduce students to the most recent research and literature on the devastating disease of cancer. How is cancer currently treated and what cures are now being pursued? How have attitudes towards the disease changed throughout history? How have individuals and their families coped with diagnosis? Students in this course will be expected to be active participants in our seminar discussions and they will be asked to conduct guided research into a topic of their own choosing. We will read a range of texts; these will include: science journals, historical documents, memoirs, drama, fiction, and autobiographical accounts. For instance, we will read cultural critic Susan Sontag’s Illness as Metaphor and medical doctor Siddhartha Mukherjee’s The Emperor of All Maladies: A Biography of Cancer. (Note: No previous science or biology background is required.)

IDC 4050H UWH — From Concept to Creation: Avant Garde Art and Writing
The roots of contemporary art and literature lie in the diverse activities of 20th and 21st century vanguards. Challenging conventional ideas about art and how art is made, these avant garde movements prioritized concept, process, and procedure over creativity, originality, and expressivity. Today, the legacies of these movements continue to redefine the roles of artists and writers. Situating these radical ideas in their historical contexts, this course will introduce students to a variety of experiments in artistic creation, from the automatic practices of Surrealism and chance operations of Dada, to the revolutionary compositions of John Cage, from the Black Mountain School, to the Beats, to the New York School of poetry, to proto-digital works by Fluxus and Oulipo. Students will engage in hands-on experimental exercises in their own art and writing to gain tools for shaping and understanding their work.

IDC 4050H DMWH — War Art
What is war art? Is it a specific genre? Is it cathartic for the creator? Is it propaganda? How does art influence war and how does war influence art? Does war art serve as a warning? As remembrance? This seminar will explore the responses of writers and visual artists to war. The majority of the course will be dedicated to the major American conflicts of the 20th and 21st centuries: World Wars I and II, Vietnam, and the so-called “War on Terror.” We will examine a diverse selection of written material including, but not limited to, poems, fiction, journalism, and graphic novels. We will also examine various aspects of visual culture including, but not limited to, print cycles, paintings, sketches, the creation of and the destruction of memorials, posters, sculptures and depictions of war narratives. Authors we will read include: Guillaume Apollinaire, Georg Trakl, Ernest Hemingway, Rebecca West, Joseph Heller, Tim O’Brien, Susan Sontag, Dexter Filkins, and Jane Mayer. Visual artists we will cover include: Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, Otto Dix, Kathe Kollwitz, Nancy Spero, Christian Boltanski, Art Spiegelman, Duane Hanson, George Segal, gran fury, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Alfredo Jaar, and Jenny Holzer.

JRN 3610 NW — Workshop: Fiction Writing
SECTION NW a special workshop in fiction writing will be taught by the Fall 2012 Harman Visiting Writer Katherine Vaz, whose award-winning books including Saudade, Mariana, and Our Lady of the Artichokes, have been translated into several languages. Vaz has been cited as the first Portuguese-American to break into mainstream publishing. Particularly welcome will be writers wishing to explore how to look forward in their cultural explorations, rather than exclusively backward to immigrant patterns or histories; who you are as a first, second, or third generation American can contribute to the new literary landscape. Authors read might include T Cooper, Gabriel Gárcia Márquez, George Saunders, ZZ Packer, Bharati Mukherjee, and James Purdy. IN ORDER TO REGISTER FOR THIS COURSE, STUDENTS MUST SUBMIT AN ONLINE APPLICATION BY MARCH 22ND ON THE HARMAN WEBSITE:
WWW.BARUCH.CUNY.EDU/WSAS/HARMAN. For questions, contact PROF. ROSLYN BERNSTEIN, RM VC 7-270 (PHONE: 646-312-3930 OR E-MAIL: Roslyn.Bernstein@BARUCH.CUNY.EDU)

JRN 3610H NWH — Honors Workshop: Fiction Writing
SECTION NWH a special honors workshop in fiction writing will be taught by the by the Fall 2012 Harman Visiting Writer Katherine Vaz, whose award-winning books including Saudade, Mariana, and Our Lady of the Artichokes, have been translated into several languages. Vaz has been cited as the first Portuguese-American to break into mainstream publishing. Particularly welcome will be writers wishing to explore how to look forward in their cultural explorations, rather than exclusively backward to immigrant patterns or histories; who you are as a first, second, or third generation American can contribute to the new literary landscape. Authors read might include T Cooper, Gabriel Gárcia Márquez, George Saunders, ZZ Packer, Bharati Mukherjee, and James Purdy. IN ORDER TO REGISTER FOR THIS COURSE, STUDENTS MUST SUBMIT AN ONLINE APPLICATION BY MARCH 22ND ON THE HARMAN WEBSITE:
WWW.BARUCH.CUNY.EDU/WSAS/HARMAN. For questions, contact PROF. ROSLYN BERNSTEIN, RM VC 7-270 (PHONE: 646-312-3930 OR E-MAIL: Roslyn.Bernstein@BARUCH.CUNY.EDU)
THIS HONORS COURSE IN FICTION WRITING IS OPEN TO STUDENTS IN AN OFFICIAL HONORS PROGRAM AND TO OTHER QUALIFIED STUDENTS WITH AN OVERALL 3.4 GPA. SEE HONORS PROGRAM INFORMATION IN THIS SCHEDULE. PREREQ: ENG 2150 OR THE EQUIVALENT AND DEPARTMENT PERMISSION ONLY; OPEN ONLY TO PROGRAM CODE-J CLOSED TO GRADUATE STUDENTS PROGRAM CODE H OR GPA 3.4H

JWS 4900 CTRA — Film and the Holocaust
This course considers how film was used both by the Third Reich as a propaganda tool and subsequently to represent the Holocaust. We will explore a number of film genres and discuss how the act of filming, the editing of a film, the imagery itself, and the role of the audience affect the meaning and reception of the work.

POL 4900 BMWA — The Federalist Paper

POL 4900 CMWA — Violence, Justice and Reconciliation

POL 4900 EMWA — Democracy and Private Property

POL 4900 FTRA — United States in the Global Economy

PSY 3040 FTRA — Psychology of Stereotyping and Prejudice
This course focuses on psychological theory and research as a mechanism for understanding prejudice, stereotyping and discrimination. The class explores discrimination based on gender, race/ethnicity, class, age, religion, sexual orientation, and physical ability in order to investigate the causes and consequences of discriminatory behavior.

PSY 9786 UMA — HR Analytics

PSY 9786 URA — Executive Coaching

PSY 9786 UTA — Organizational Development

SOC 3085 MFA — Sociology of the Internet
This course will examine how the Internet and its related new information and communication technologies has transformed society with particular emphasis on issues of (1) access and inequality (the “digital divide”), (2) political participation and civil society (the “dictator’s dilemma”), (3) freedom of speech, e-commerce, intellectual property, and the telecommunications industry (“net neutrality”), (4) social interaction and virtual communities, and (5) culture, creativity, and entertainment. While the emergence of the Internet may seem uniquely revolutionary in how it alters social life, each previous innovation in information and communication technology during the 20th century (telephone, radio, film, and television) also changed society in fundamental ways. We will view the emergence of the Internet as part of that history.



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