Elizabeth Heath

Assistant Professor

Email:

elizabeth.heath@baruch.cuny.edu

Location: VC 5-256
Phone: (646) 312-4316

 

Elizabeth Heath joins Baruch as Assistant Professor of History. An historian of Modern France and the French Empire, her research focuses on colonialism, globalization, and everyday life in France and the French empire.  Her current project, provisionally entitled Colonialism and Everyday Life in Modern France, examines the broad history of the French Empire through the “life history” of six colonial commodities—sugar, palm oil, wheat, rubber, vanilla, and cocoa—all of which played a central role in colonial trade at different moments of the French empire.  By tracing the histories of these six different commodities she hopes to show how contemporary conceptions of “Frenchness” are indebted to past relations with colonial territories, producers, and products.  In the upcoming years she will be teaching a variety of classes on modern Europe, modern France and the French Empire, including classes on the Haitian Revolution, Nineteenth Century Europe, and the history of everyday life. Professor Heath received her Ph.D. from the University of Chicago.

Most recent or current research:  

My research focuses on colonialism, globalization, and everyday life in France and the French empire.  My current project, provisionally entitled Colonialism and Everyday Life in Modern France, examines the broad history of the French Empire through the “life history” of six colonial commodities—sugar, palm oil, wheat, rubber, vanilla, and cocoa—all of which played a central role in colonial trade at different moments of the French empire. 

Subject Matter Expertise (topics):

Modern Europe; Modern France; French Empire; Commodity Studies

Degrees (with institution):

Ph.D. University of Chicago (2007)

M.A. University of Chicago (1997)

B.A. New College of Florida (1994)

Affiliations (boards, organizations):

Member of the American Historical Association

French Historical Society

Most recent publications (articles and/books) or exhibitions:

“Creating Rural Citizens in Guadeloupe in the Early Third Republic,” Slavery & Abolition, 32, 2 (June 2011): 289-307.

The City University of New York