Weissman School of Arts and Sciences

Courses

This discipline explores the social, political, cultural, and economic history of Black and Latino peoples throughout the world from ancient to modern times. Themes include justice, racism and discrimination, the urban experience, community economic development, micro-enterprise, small business development, nonprofit organizations, the development of community, social and public policy, cultural, literary, and artistic production, identity, and media portrayals.

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Phone: (646) 312-4448
Email: Vilna Bashi Treitler

COURSES IN BLACK AND Latino STUDIES

Black Studies

  • BLS 3006 Selected Social Problems of the Ghetto
  • BLS 3007 Planning in Urban Areas
  • BLS 3008 Urban Economic Structure
  • BLS 3010 The Black Child and Adolescent in the United States
  • BLS 3011 Variations in the Black American Family
  • BLS 3013 Mass Media and the Black American
  • BLS 3014 Civil Rights Legislation and Litigation
  • BLS 3015 Black Economic Development: 1860 to the Present
  • BLS 3018 African Philosophy and Religion
  • BLS 3020 Black History in Newspapers and Fiction: 1940-2000
  • BLS 3024 Women of Color in the Americas
  • BLS 3043 Theater of Color in the United States
  • BLS 3044 Migration in the Americas (NEW COURSE);
  • BLS 3045 Changing Demographics of the City (NEW COURSE)
  • BLS 3085 Special Topics in Black Studies (NEW COURSE)
  • BLS 3115 People and Culture of Haiti

Latino Studies

  • LTS 3000 The Puerto Rican Child
  • LTS 3001 The Puerto Rican Community (Puerto Rican Field Research Work)
  • LTS 3002 Puerto Rican Political and Economic Development in the Twentieth Century
  • LTS 3003 Major Selected Problems of the Puerto Rican Community
  • LTS 3006 Religions of the Caribbean
  • LTS 3009 Dominican Heritage
  • LTS 3010 Central America: A Regional Study
  • LTS 3012 Latinas: A Social and Cultural (NEW COURSE)
  • LTS 3044 Migration in the Americas (NEW COURSE)
  • LTS 3045 Changing Demographics of the City (NEW COURSE)
  • LTS 3085 Special Topics in Hispanic\Latino Studies (NEW COURSE)

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

Note: Please see the Baruch Undergraduate Bulletin for official course descriptions; see the Schedule of Classes for official information on course offerings and times.

Black Studies (BLS)

1000 (1) African History Until the Dispersion, Seventeenth Century

3 hours; 3 credits
A course comprising the history of the African tribal groups and culture in ancient Africa and surveying the various African kingdoms, tribal interaction, and contact with the peoples north of the Sahara. The course will also survey the exploration and penetration of Africa by the European powers, including the commencement of the dispersion of the Black people to the New World.

1001 (2) Geography and Cultures of Africa

3 hours; 3 credits
A survey course of the geography and cultures of Africa with particular emphasis on topography, climate, natural resources, and culture of the various African tribal groups south of the Sahara. This course will be offered if there is sufficient demand.

1002 (3) Black American History, Seventeenth Century Until the Present Time

3 hours; 3 credits
This course surveys and analyzes the social history of the Black people in the United States from the time of their initial contact with the European colonialists on the American continent. It will also comprise the study of the institution of slavery and the abolition movement within the framework of the social and political history of the United States. Personalities and policies of various Black Americans will be discussed within the social context of their days as well as current events and issues. (This course corresponds to HIS 2060.)

1003 (4) The Evolution and Expressions of Racism

3 hours; 3 credits
A multidimensional course approaching racism from a historical, political, economic, and sociological point of view. The nature of prejudice will be discussed with regard to prejudice against Southern European, Mexican-American, Jewish, and Puerto Rican groups. Emphasis will be placed upon the effects of racism on Black people in the United States. The study will be discussed with regard to the effects of racism on the perpetrators and their victims. This course will be offered if there is sufficient demand.

1013 (18) The Administration and Process of Justice

3 hours; 3 credits
This course stresses the machinery of justice, organization of federal, state, and local court systems as well as law enforcement agencies. Special problems of justice and the poor and concepts of social reconstruction through law will be surveyed and analyzed. This course will be offered if there is sufficient demand.

1019 The Black Americas—An Institutional and Cultural Survey

3 hours; 3 credits
This course offers a multidisciplinary approach to then study of the origins and manifestations of African cultures in the Americas-North, South, and Central America and the Caribbean. Using historical and anthropological tools, the course seeks to reconstruct a view of the Americas' past that is centered on the perspectives and experiences of the enslaved Africans and their descendants.

3000 (7) Economic Development and Problems of Independence in African Countries I

3 hours; 3 credits
The course deals with problems of economic development in developing African countries. The course explores such problems as technical assistance and aid from Western countries and the United Nations. Methods and approaches to economic development will be discussed in the context of the political framework of newly independent African states. Prerequisite: BLS 1001 or departmental permission. This course will be offered if there is sufficient demand.

3001 (8) Economic Development and Problems of Independence in African Countries II

3 hours; 3 credits
A continuation of BLS 3000. Prerequisite: BLS 3000 or departmental permission. This course will be offered if there is sufficient demand.

3003 (16) Local Governement and Customary Law in Africa

3 hours; 3 credits
This is a study of the nature of African customary law, indirect rule, and local government systems exported to Africa by the colonial powers. It will also deal with current local government in independent African countries. Prerequisite: BLS 1000 or 1001 or departmental permission. This course will be offered if there is sufficient demand.

3006 (1010, 14) Selected Social Problems of the Ghetto

3 hours; 3 credits
The history and establishment of the ghetto in American cities and the various problems that the Black community faces. The impact of urbanization upon the Black family will be analyzed. The new concept of s e l f - determination of the Black community will also be discussed. Prerequisite: BLS 1019 or SOC 1005 or departmental permission. This course will be offered if there is sufficient demand.

3007 (1014, 19) Planning in Urban Areas

3 hours; 3 credits
This course will consider the background of the development of present urban areas and the significance of planning. The social, political, and economic ramifications of urban renewal programs will be analyzed. Prerequisite: BLS 1005 or 1019 or departmental permission. This course will be offered if there is sufficient demand.

3008 (1015,10) Urban Economic Structure

3 hours; 3 credits
An investigation of economic influences as they relate to business locations, housing, poverty, welfare, and public transportation policy. The dynamics and growth of the metropolitan area will be given special attention. Prerequisite: BLS 1005 or 1019 or departmental permission. This course will be offered if there is sufficient demand.

3010 The Black Child and Adolescent in the United States

3 hours; 3 credits
This course is an exploration of the Black child and adolescent both in a historical perspective dating to slavery and in terms of the political, social, economic, psychological, educational, and familial circumstances that affect the developing Black child today. The commonalties, diversities, and adaptations of young Black Americans will be analyzed. Pre- or corequisite: BLS 1019 or PSY 1001 or SOC 1005 or EDU 1101 or departmental permission.

3011 Variations in the Black American Family

3 hours; 3 credits
This course is an intensive study of the Black American family. African heritage, post-Civil War family structure, and the impact of urbanization are the initial focus. Next we compare and contrast Black upper-middle-class, lower-middle-class, and working-class family structures. We also explore the Black single life, the polygamous relationship, and other lifestyles. Black American, Western Indian, and immigrant African family structures and variations are also examined. Prerequisite: BLS 1019 or SOC 1005 or departmental permission.

3012 Black Revolution and Political Thinking in the U.S.

3 hours; 3 credits
The contradictory Assimilationist and Separatist movements that swept Black America during the fifties and sixties are analyzed from the historical, sociological, political, economic, and psychological points of view. Leaders, objectives, accomplishments, and landmark events in the opposing movements are contrasted throughout. Precisely how, and to what extent, the Black activism of that era has reverberated throughout the entire American society is also studied. Prerequisite: BLS 1002 or BLS 1019 or HIS 2060 or POL1101 or departmental permission. This course will be offered if there is sufficient demand.

3013 Mass Media and the Black American

3 hours; 3 credits
This course is a study of the social and psychological effects of media, such as radio, television, newspapers, motion pictures, and advertisements, upon Black Americans in a predominantly white society. A survey of the portrayal of the Black American in the mass media is also considered. Prerequisite: BLS 1019 or SOC 1005 or PSY 1001 or departmental permission. This course will be offered if there is sufficient demand.

3014 Civil Rights Legislation and Litigation

3 hours; 3 credits
This course is designed to facilitate an understanding of the role the law has played in the development of civil rights for African-Americans. It examines and analyzes such critical cases as Plessy v. Ferguson, Brown v. Board of Education, and Regents of California v. Bakke. In addition, significant legislative and executive changes affecting the civil rights of African-Americans a rediscussed and analyzed. Prerequisite: BLS 1002 or BLS 1019 or HIS 2060 or POL1101 or POL2313 or departmental permission.

3015 Black Economic Development: 1860 to the Present

3 hours; 3 credits
This course examines African-American economic development in a historical context from the period of the Civil War to the present. It examines Black businesses and businesspersons to see what businesses have evolved and how they have evolved. Successful Black businesses and businesspersons are examined as case studies to assist students before business plans are developed to contribute to the revitalization of business life. Prerequisite: BLS 1019 or ECO 1001 or ECO 1002 or SOC 1005 or departmental permission.

3018 African Philosophy and Religion

3 hours; 3 credits
Survey of the major religions and philosophies of Africa, including the social impact, the theology, cosmology, and the morals embedded in the religions of the ancient Egyptians, indigenous African religions, Christianity, and Islam. It covers the major philosophical movements in Africa, including the works of Plotinus, Philo and Maimonides, Clement, Origin, Augustine, and Ibn Khaldun, as well as recent developments in philosophy in north Africa and in the religions of African-Americans. Prerequisite: one course from any of these disciplines: BLS or HSP or ANTor PHI or REL or departmental permission.

3020 Black History in Newspapers and Fiction: 1940–2000

3 hours; 3 credits
The course offers students the opportunity to explore Black fiction and Black newspapers from several cities from 1940 through the 1990s to learn the themes and details that characterized the lives of Black communities during the latter portion of the twentieth century. Black newspapers from the North and South will be used extensively. Prerequisites: BLS 1019 and ENG 2100, or ENG 2150, or departmental permission.

3022 The African Independence Movement

3 hours; 3 credits
This course is designed to broaden students' understanding of the systematic forces and catalysts of the independence movements in twentieth-century Africa. It employs the case study approach to examine the reaction of the Europeans. Each student selects a country or region of major interest as a continuing vantage point of cultural perspective for a case analysis. Finally, this course examines the post-colonial- and post-independence-era relations of economic structures, political institutions, and class formation to neocolonialism. Prerequisite: BLS 1000 or HIS 2090 or POL1101 or departmental permission.

3024 Women of Color in the Americas

3 hours; 3 credits
This course will examine the status and role of women of color in the traditional societies of their origin and in pre-industrial, industrial, and postindustrial United States. It will consider the way that gender has interacted with culture, race, and class to determine the experience of women of color in society. Prerequisite: one course in Caribbean, Latin American, African, or United States history; sociology; or anthropology.

3025 People and Culture of Haiti

3 hours; 3 credits
This course is a survey of the sociopolitical, cultural, racial, and economic processes that have shaped the formation of modern Haiti. Particular focus will be on the role of St. Domingue in the emerging world capitalist economy during the seventeenth century, the Haitian Revolution, the U.S. Occupation (1915-1934), the Duvalier Regime (1956-1986), and the social and cultural institutions in contemporary Haiti. (This course is the same as SOC 3025. Students will receive credit for either BLS 3025 or SOC 3025, not both.) Prerequisite: BLS 1019 or HSP 1003 or HIS 2070 or HIS 2090 or SOC 1005 or ANT 1001 or departmental permission.

3043 Theatre of Color in the United States

3 hours; 3 credits
This course introduces students to the essential roots of the leading theatres of color in the United States: African-American, Asian-American, Hispanic-American, and Native American. Selected texts of both classic and contemporary plays representative of these four groups are read, discussed, and critiqued in written form and, whenever available concurrently in New York City, seen in production. (This course is identical to THE 3043. Students will receive credit for either BLS 3043 or THE 3043, not both.) Prerequisites: one 3-credit communication studies course and ENG 2100.

3044 Migration in the Americas (New Course)

3 hours; 3 credits
This course examines the recent literature on contemporary migration processes and international migration flows throughout the Americas. The course focuses on understanding the causes of migration, the migration process, the dynamics of adaptation and incorporation into receiving societies, and connections between migrant communities and countries of origin. The course will also examine the historical development and the nature of the main debates on migration policy throughout the Americas. Prerequisites: ENG 2100 and one of the following: HSP 1001 or HSP 1003 or BLS 1019

3045 Changing Demographics of the City (New Course)

3 hours; 3 credits
This course focuses on the meaning, causes, and impacts of demographic transformations on socially and spatially defined urban political economies. Students learn how to use demographic and economic data to analyze the present and future shape of cities--both in the United States and abroad--and the implications of such transformations for the various residents of cities and for policy and decision making in public and private sectors. Prerequisites: ENG 2100 and one of the following: HSP 1001 or HSP 1003 or BLS 1019

3085 Special Topics in Black Studies

3 hours; 3 credits
This course provides an opportunity to focus on specific issues in the field of Black Studies from historical, sociological and/or anthropological perspectives, among others. Topics vary from semester to semester and may address questions of gender, race, class, language and culture among Black (African American, West Indian, African or other) groups living in the United States. Prerequisites: One of the following: BLS 1019, HSP 1000, HSP 1004, HSP 1001, HIS 1003, or SOC 1005; and ENG 2150 or equivalent; or departmental permission.

4900 African and Latino Diasporas in America: A Comparative Study

3 hours; 3 credits
This course offers a comparative overview of African and Latino diasporas in the Americas from the fifteenth century to the present day. Topics include the impact of slavery and colonial domination; patterns of migration within the Caribbean and to North America; the cultural, political, and economic interactions resulting from migration; and expressions of resistance in music, language, and religion. (This course is equivalent to HSP 4900. Students will receive credit for either BLS 4900 or HSP 4900, not both.) Prerequisites: Student who wish to use this course to fulfill the Tier III minor requirement must complete two 3000-level courses in the Department of Black and Hispanic Studies.

Latino Studies (LTS)

1000 Puerto Rican Heritage: Pre-Columbian to 1898

3 hours; 3 credits
This course will be a survey of the cultural history of Puerto Rico from pre-Columbian times to the nineteenth century. It will include the Indian, African, and Hispanic sources of the culture of Puerto Rico, as well as other historical and sociological implications.

1003 Latin America: An Institutional and Cultural Survey

3 hours; 3 credits
This course examines the nature and origins of social, political, and economic institutions of Latin America. Its rich and varied culture, an outgrowth of past experiences involving much racial and ethnic mixing, is studied in this institutional context.

1004 Latinos in the U.S.:Culture and Society

3 hours; 3 credits
This course offers an introduction to the different Latino communities living in the United States. The course will explore the similarities and differences among various groups including their histories of migration, incorporation into the US, and issues in education, employment, politics, language, and culture. The course will also explore the construction of Latino identities and attempts to forge a common identity.

3000 The Puerto Rican Child in His Urban Setting

3 hours; 3 credits
A survey of sociological, psychological, and educational needs of Puerto Rican children in New York City public schools. Special emphasis will be given to family, race relations, community living, and language problems encountered by this group. This course could be specifically adapted for student teachers. Prerequisite: LTS 1000 or PSY 1001 or SOC 1005 or departmental permission.

3001 The Puerto Rican Community (Puerto Rican Field Research Work)

3 hours; 3 credits
A study of the migration of the Puerto Rican to New York City and other urban centers, its sociological impact, and problems resulting in education, housing, health services, and family and community development. Practical experience and research will be a part of this course by placing students in agencies serving Puerto Ricans (bilingual schools, day care centers, etc.). Prerequisite: LTS 1000 or 1003 or departmental permission.

3003 Major Selected Problems of the Puerto Rican Community

3 hours; 3 credits
Pivotal current issues of citywide importance in our potentially explosive communities are critically examined. Specific attention will be given to areas of public education, justice and the poor, unemployment, family structure and social disorganization, health and welfare in the physical work and the human environment, economic dimensions of poverty, the poor, housing, police and community relations, politics and the ghetto, and media and disorders. Prerequisite: LTS 1000 or departmental permission. This course will be offered if there is sufficient demand.

3004 Politics and Power in Puerto Rico

3 hours; 3 credits
This course gives students a general view of the development of political parties in Puerto Rico from the time of self-government under Spanish sovereignty to the present. It examines the political setting in which those parties emerged. A comparative study of different party systems (Latin American countries, the U.S., and England) and the Puerto Rican experience will also be considered. Prerequisite: LTS 1001 or HIS 1005 or HIS 2090 or POL 2260 or departmental permission. This course will be offered if there is sufficient demand.

3005 Economic History of Puerto Rico

3 hours; 3 credits
This course is a survey of the Puerto Rican economy under Spain and the United States. It explores the relations of economic structures to political institutions and class formations from the colonial past to the present. This course considers whether social-economic processes in Puerto Rico can be studied as a model for economic growth and/or development for Third World countries. Prerequisite: LTS 1000 or 1001 or 1003 or ECO 1001 or 1002 or SOC 1005 or ANT 1001 or departmental permission. This course will be offered if there is sufficient demand.

3006 Religions of the Caribbean

3 hours; 3 credits
This course examines the various religious expressions in Puerto Rico, Cuba, Haiti, and the Dominican Republic using a comparative approach to elements of Santeria, Espirtismo, Christianity, and voodoo. Jamaica, Trinidad, and other islands will be looked at. Prerequisite: LTS 1000 or 1003 or BLS 1000 or BLS 1018 or REL 1001 or SOC 1005 or departmental permission.

3007 Puerto Rican Culture

3 hours; 3 credits
The principal varieties of Puerto Rican cultural expression, both on the island and in the U.S., are examined in detail. Special attention is given to folk culture, including traditional beliefs, legends, customs, festivals, religious rites, artistic productions, popular poetry, dance and folk medicine, and typical music. Prerequisite: LTS 1000 or LTS 1003 or HIS 2070 or HIS 2075 (3710) or SOC 1005 or ANT 1001 or departmental permission.

3008 Puerto Rican Heritage: 1898 to the Present

3 hours; 3 credits
This course is an intensive study of cultural history of Puerto Rico from the Spanish-American War to the present. Special attention is given to cultural conflicts and assimilative influences, as well as the existing relations between Puerto Rico and the United States. Prerequisite: LTS 1000 or LTS 1003 or HIS 1005 or SOC 1005 or departmental permission.

3009 Dominican Heritage: From Pre-Columbian Times to Present

3 hours; 3 credits
This course is a study of the cultural heritage of the Dominican Republic from pre-Columbian times to the present. It includes the Indian, African, and Hispanic sources of the Dominican culture, as well as other diverse sociocultural contributions. Prerequisite: LTS 1000 or LTS 1003 or HIS 1003 or SOC 1005 or departmental permission.

3010 Central America: A Regional Study

3 hours; 3 credits
The many complex problems and varied cultural elements of this area of nation-states are studied. The goal is to study representative examples or general trends while also explaining the major political, social, and economic events that have shaped and continue to shape the region's history. (This course is cross-listed as LTS 3010. Students may receive credit for LTS 3010 or LTS 3010, not both.) Prerequisites: one of the following: LTS 1000, HSP 1003, HIS 1001, HIS 1003, or SOC 1005; and ENG 2100 or equivalent; or departmental permission. This course will be offered if there is sufficient demand.

3011 The Contemporary Puerto Rican Family

3 hours; 3 credits
This course is a study of the dynamics of change in the present Puerto Rican family structure from the early colonial setting to the present urban family. The legal and social structure from the Law of the Indies to the present legislation stressing morals, ethics, values, religion, education, and the disorganization and other aspects of the Puerto Rican family structure are studied. Students conduct research on these topics, utilizing current research journals and primary sources. Prerequisite: LTS 1000 or LTS 1003 or SOC 1005 or ANT 1001 or departmental permission.

3012 Latinas: A Social and Cultural Survey

3 hours; 3 credits
This course addresses the social and economic condition of Latinas in the United States. We will discuss questions of gender and sexuality, language, politics, labor relations, family relationships, literary and artistic expression, and the construction of identities as they manifest themselves in the experiences of contemporary Latina women.

3044 Migration in the Americas (New Course)

3 hours; 3 credits
This course examines the recent literature on contemporary migration processes and international migration flows throughout the Americas. The course focuses on understanding the causes of migration, the migration process, the dynamics of adaptation and incorporation into receiving societies, and connections between migrant communities and countries of origin. The course will also examine the historical development and the nature of the main debates on migration policy throughout the Americas. Prerequisites: ENG 2100 and one of the following: LTS 1001 or LTS 1003 or BLS 1019

3045 Changing Demographics of the City (New Course)

3 hours; 3 credits
This course focuses on the meaning, causes, and impacts of demographic transformations on socially and spatially defined urban political economies. Students learn how to use demographic and economic data to analyze the present and future shape of cities--both in the United States and abroad--and the implications of such transformations for the various residents of cities and for policy and decision making in public and private sectors. Prerequisites: ENG 2100 and one of the following: LTS 1001 or LTS 1003 or BLS 1019

3085 Special Topics in Latino Studies

This course provides an opportunity to focus on specific issues in the field of Latino Studies from historical, sociological and/or anthropological perspectives, among others. Topics vary from semester to semester and may address questions of gender, race, class, language and culture in Latino groups living in the United States. Prerequisites: One of the following: LTS 1000, LTS 1003, LTS 1004, HIS 1001, HIS 1003, or SOC 1005; and ENG 2150 or equivalent; or departmental permission.

4900 African and Latino Diasporas in America: A Comparative Study

3 hours; 3 credits
This course offers a comparative overview of African and Latino diasporas in the Americas from the fifteenth century to the present day. Topics include the impact of slavery and colonial domination; patterns of migration within the Caribbean and to North America; the cultural, political, and economic interactions resulting from migration; and expressions of resistance in music, language, and religion. (This course is equivalent to LTS 4900. Students will receive credit for either BLS 4900 or LTS 4900, not both.) Prerequisites: Student who wish to use this course to fulfill the Tier III minor requirement must complete two 3000-level courses in the Department of Black and Latino Studies.

5000-5004 Independent Study

Hours and credits to be arranged

The City University of New York