Research Integrity Officer (RIO)

Research Misconduct Articles

  1. Research Misconduct
    1. Misconduct Hearing Granted
    2. Neuroscientist Guilty of Misconduct
    3. Institute Keeps Chronic Fatigue Grant
    4. Misconduct Called Out on YouTube
    5. More Retractions, Not Dishonesty
    6. Neurosurgery Resident Plagiarized Research
    7. A Journal’s Statement May Aid a Harvard Researcher Accused of Misconduct
    8. Difficulties in Defining Errors in Case Against Harvard Researcher
    9. Purdue, Citing Research Misconduct, Punishes Scientist
    10. Columbia Professor in Noose Case is Fired in Plagiarism Case
    11. The Retraction Mother Lode
    12. Plant RNA Questioned
    13. Retractions Symptom of Flawed System
    14. Misconduct on the Rise
    15. Notesbooks Shed Light on an Antibiotic's Contested Discovery
    16. On the Chain Gang
    17. Immunologist Falsified Data
    18. Neuroscientist Falsifies Data
    19. Sanctioned Psychiatrist Off Restriction
    20. Fraud Breeds Retractions
    21. A Decade of Research Misconduct
    22. 'My Advisor Stole My Research'
    23. Festive Fraud
  2. Fraud and Fabrication
    1. Double Grants, Double Trouble
    2. Wine Researcher Caught Faking
    3. Stapel Paper Retracted
    4. Cancer Researcher Fabricated Data
    5. St. Jude Postdoc Faked Images
    6. School Sued for Fake Cancer Test
    7. Renal Researchers Faked Data
    8. Fake Credentials in Nanomed Leader
    9. Life After Fraud
    10. Fairness for Fraudsters
    11. Elsevier Published 6 Fake Journals
    12. Stem Cell Researcher Fabricates Data
    13. Scientist Fabricates Cancer Data
    14. Opinion: Misleading Drug Trials
    15. Parkinson's Researcher Fabricated Data
    16. Another Victim of Suspicious Data
    17. Diabetes Researcher Repeated Figures
    18. Confirmed Data Faker
    19. Chemist Admits to Mass Misconduct
    20. Discredited Stem Cell Researcher Fired
    21. Ex-Official at SUNY Charged $131,000 in Personal Expenses to Foundation, Audit Finds
    22. Social Psychology Damned Again
  3. Conflict of Interest
    1. Example of Disclosure in "Brainpower Tied to Omega-3 Levels" in last paragraph
    2. Climate Conflict of Interest?
    3. Conflict Disclosure Plan Dropped
    4. Overhauling Industry-Sponsored Studies
    5. Opinion: What's Wrong with COI?
    6. Dangers of Disclosure
    7. Federal Scientists File Lawsuit
  4. Data Ownership and Intellectual Property
    1. Sloan-Kettering Chief is Accused of Taking Research
    2. Academic Win Patent Rights
    3. Gene Patent Stirs Controversy
    4. Playing Fair with Industry
    5. Sanofi Thief Reprimanded
    6. Watson Opposes Gene Patents
    7. Court Rules Gene Patents Valid
    8. Should Human Genes be Patented
  5. Human Subject Research
    1. Research Harms Students?
    2. Revising Federal Human Subjects Protections
    3. Space Rocks
    4. Drug Abuse Study's Ethics Questioned
    5. Pharma Whistleblower
    6. Clinical Trail Misfortune
  6. Animal Care in Research
    1. Lab Animal Transport Ends
    2. More Animal Welfare Problems at UCFS
    3. Embattled Ape Researcher Reinstated
  7. Responsible Conduct in Research (RCR)
    1. Ghost Writing is Fraudulent
    2. Integrity Guidelines Up for Public Review
    3. The Game of Ghost Writing
    4. "Gray Plagiarism"
    5. Scientists Behaving Badly
    6. H5N1 Researcher to Defy Dutch Government
    7. Opinion: Academic Publishing is Broken
    8. All's Not Fair in Science and Publishing
    9. Surprise XMRV Retraction
    10. Do That Again
    11. Expensive Retraction

Note: In order to view some of the articles, a free subscription to The-Scientist.com is required.

 

Lab Animal Transport Ends
The last company that ferried research animals into the UK halted service after pressure from an animal rights group.
By: Hannah Waters
The Scientist; Published online 15 March 2012
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Misconduct Hearing Granted
A cancer researcher charged with scientific misconduct in 2011 may have the right to present his defense?a rare occurrence under current regulations.
By: Hannah Waters
The Scientist; Published online 9 March 2012
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Neuroscientist Guilty of Misconduct
Michael Miller is found guilty of research misconduct, having falsified data in four NIH grants, two papers, and one manuscript.
By: Hannah Waters
The Scientist; Published online 28 February 2012
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Brainpower Tied to Omega-3 Levels
A study of older adults finds that those with higher omega-3 fatty acid levels had larger brain volume and performed better in tests of mental acuity.
By: Nicholas Bakalar, NY Times
Published: February 27, 2012
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Climate Conflict of Interest?
Greenpeace flags researchers? payments from a climate change skeptic organization.
By: Megan Scudellari
The Scientist; Published online 24 February 2012
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Institute Keeps Chronic Fatigue Grant
The Institute whose now-retracted research linking chronic fatigue syndrome to a viral pathogen will keep its $1.5 million grant.
By: Edyta Zielinska
The Scientist; Published online 9 February 2012
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Double Grants, Double Trouble
Observers see grant application fraud as evidence that tighter controls preventing duplicate funding are necessary.
By: Sabrina Richards
The Scientist; Published online 8 February 2012
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Sloan-Kettering Chief is Accused of Taking Research
The president of Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Dr. Craig B. Thompson, is in a billion-dollar dispute with his former workplace over accusations that he walked away with research.
By: Andrew Pollack, NY Times
Published: February 5, 2012
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Misconduct Called Out on YouTube
A 6-minute video posted on YouTube documents more than 60 alleged cases of image manipulation in 24 papers from a single researcher.
By: Hannah Waters
The Scientist; Published online 26 January 2012
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Wine Researcher Caught Faking
One of the leading scientific voices touting the health benefits of red wine fabricated data dozens of times.
By: Bob Grant
The Scientist; Published online 13 January 2012
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More Retractions, Not Dishonesty
The surge in retractions may be the result of better detection tools and more vigilant journal editors, not an increase in ethical problems.
By: Tia Ghose
The Scientist; Published online 12 January 2012
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Stapel Paper Retracted
The Dutch Psychologist who's made headlines recently for a massive case of scientific fraud has a Science paper retracted.
By: Jef Akst
The Scientist; Published online 2 December 2011
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Research Harms Students?
The University of Oklahoma is investigating allegations that a professor of exercise physiology used students in research inappropriately.
By: Edyta Zielinska
The Scientist; Published online 8 November 2011
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Ghost Writing is Fraudulent
A legal remedy is needed to curb unethical “guest authorship” in medical journals.
By: Simon Stern and Trudo Lemmens
The Scientist; Published online 2 November 2011
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Neurosurgery Resident Plagiarized Research
A physician doing a residency at the University of Virginia Medical Center was caught copying sections of text and an illustration in multiple NIH-funded papers.
By: Bob Grant
The Scientist; Published online 7 November 2011
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Revising Federal Human Subjects Protections
On Tuesday, July 26th, 2011, the Department of Health and Human Services published in the Federal Register (Vol. 76, No. 143) advanced notice of proposed rulemaking (ANPRM), an invitation to comment on a list of nearly twenty significant revisions to 45 CFR Parts 46, 160, and 164 under consideration.
By: University of Louisville Research Integrity Program
Compliance Companion, Volume VI Summer 2011
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Cancer Researcher Fabricated Data
Sheng Wang, assistant professor of medicine at the Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) Cancer Research Center until last month, committed research misconduct, the Department of Health and Human Services’ Office of Research Integrity (ORI) announced last Friday (August 5). Specifically, the ORI determined that Wang fabricated data published in two 2009 papers in the journals Molecular Endocrinology (ME) and Oncogene, both of which Wang has agreed to retract.

By: Jessica P. Johnson
The Scientist; Published online 11 August 2011

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Integrity Guidelines Up for Public Review
NSF drafts guidelines of its scientific integrity principles, and opens them up for public comment.

By: Cristina Luiggi
The Scientist; Published online 5 August 2011

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Conflict Disclosure Plan Dropped
The NIH will not require universities to create websites detailing researchers' financial ties.

By: Meredith Wadman
Nature; Published online 1 August 2011

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St. Jude Postdoc Faked Images
A former postdoctoral researcher at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital fudged images published in two papers, one of which has since been retracted.

By: Tia Ghose
The Scientist; Published online 22 June 2011

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A Journal’s Statement May Aid a Harvard Researcher Accused of Misconduct
The journal Science said Monday that Marc Hauser, the Harvard researcher whom the university accused last year of eight charges of scientific misconduct, has replicated an experiment he published in 2007.

By: Nicholas Wade, NY Times
Published: April 25, 2011

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Difficulties in Defining Errors in Case Against Harvard Researcher
The still unresolved case of Marc Hauser, the researcher accused by Harvard of scientific misconduct, points to the painful slowness of the government-university procedure for resolving such charges. It also underscores the difficulty of defining error in a field like animal cognition where inconsistent results are common.

By: Nicholas Wade, NY Times
Published: October 25, 2010

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The Game of Ghost Writing
When Sen. Charles Grassley raised concerns last month about scientific "ghost writing," in which papers are produced by companies or other parties whose names do not appear as authors, he acknowledged that he was unsure how widespread the practice was. A pair of studies presented Thursday at a scholarly meeting in Vancouver offer evidence of both the depth and the bread of the controversial activity.

By: Doug Lederman
Inside Higher Ed; Published online 11 September 2009

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School Sued for Fake Cancer Test
A biotechnology company is suing the University of Pittsburgh over a test for prostate cancer, the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review reported last week. The lawsuit claims the test is "no more accurate in distinguishing cancerous tissue from normal tissue than flipping a coin," according to the newspaper.

By: Jef Akst
The Scientist; Published online 8 September 2009

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Fake Credentials in Nanomed Leader
Experts in nanomedicine are questioning the credentials of a researcher who has portrayed himself as an expert in the fledgling field, even starting a professional society and procuring a post as editor of the journal Nanomedicine.

By: Edyta Zielinska
The Scientist; Published online 25 June 2009

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Renal Researchers Faked Data
Two researchers conducting animal studies on immunosuppression lied about experimental methodologies and falsified data in 16 papers and several grants produced over the past 8 years, according to the Office of Research Integrity (ORI).

By: Bob Grant
The Scientist; Published online 13 July 2009

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"Gray Plagiarism": A Case from the History of the History of Computing - pdf
Claiming as one's own what one knows to be the discovery of another is certainly plagiarism. But what about merely failing to acknowledge the work of another where one does not give the impression that the discovery is one's own? Does it matter how easy it was to make the discovery? This paper analyzes a case in this gray area in academic ethics. The focus is not on the failure to attribute itself but on the attempt of an independent scholar who, believing himself to be the victim of "gray plagiarism”, sought a forum in which to make his complaint. The story could be told from several perspectives. I shall tell it primarily from the perspective of the complainant, an outsider, because I believe that way of telling it best reveals the need to think more deeply about how we (acting for the universities to which we belong) assign credit, especially to scholars outside, and about how we respond when someone complains of a failure to assign credit. My purpose is not to indict individuals but to change a system. This paper updates a case I first described in 1993.

Davis, M. (2006). “Gray Plagiarism”: A Case from the History of the History of Computing. Plagiary: Cross‐Disciplinary Studies in Plagiarism, Fabrication, and Falsification, 1 (7): 1‐18.

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Life After Fraud
Each year, the U.S. Office of Research Integrity (ORI) investigates dozens of charges of scientific misconduct. And each year, the ORI adds a handful of names to a list of researchers found guilty of falsifying figures, fabricating data, or committing other academic infractions. As of April 1, 2009, this Administrative Actions list, presented on the ORI Web site, carried 38 names. These people are barred from receiving federal funds and/or serving on a Public Health Service committee, typically for a period of 3–5 years. Once the debarment term is up, the name disappears from the list. In theory, the punishment—and the shame—of the ordeal is over.

By: Alison McCook
The Scientist 23.7, 28 (July 2009)

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Fairness for Fraudsters
The Office of Research Integrity (ORI), part of the US Public Health Service (PHS), serves an indispensible function: the identification and punishment of wrongdoers. A pioneer in the fight—and it is a fight—to retain honesty in scientific research, ORI continues to set standards for others around the world to follow. For the sake of research, researchers, and the wider community, it is essential that science's house is kept in order; we owe a debt of gratitude to ORI for the work that it does.

However, the system has a serious problem. Offenders are suffering far harsher penalties than intended.

By: Richard Gallagher
The Scientist 23.7, 13 (July 2009)

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Elsevier Published 6 Fake Journals
Scientific publishing giant Elsevier put out a total of six publications between 2000 and 2005 that were sponsored by unnamed pharmaceutical companies and looked like peer reviewed medical journals, but did not disclose sponsorship, the company has admitted.

By: Bob Grant
The Scientist; Published online 7 May 2009

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Purdue, Citing Research Misocnduct, Punishes Scientist
An appeals committee at Purdue University has upheld findings of misconduct on the part of a professor who claims to have created energy-generating fusion in a tabletop experiment.

By: Kenneth Chang, NY Times
Published: August 27, 2008

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Columbia Professor in Noose Case is Fired in Plagiarism Case
Madonna G. Constantine, a professor of psychology and education, gained widespread attention last fall after a noose was found hanging on her office door.

By: Marc Santora, NY Times
Published: June 24, 2008

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Scientists Behaving Badly
To protect the integrity of science, we must look beyond falsification, fabrication and plagiarism, to a wider range of questionable research practices, argue Brian C. Martinson, Melissa S. Anderson and Raymond de Vries.

Serious misbehaviour in research is important for many reasons, not least because it damages the reputation of, and undermines public support for, science. Historically, professionals and the public have focused on headline-grabbing cases of scientific misconduct, but we believe that researchers can no longer afford to ignore a wider range of questionable behaviour that threatens the integrity of science.

Nature 435, 737-738 (9 June 2005) | doi:10.1038/435737a; Published online 8 June 2005

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Academics Win Patent Rights A judge says that government and university labs have to share the patent rights to the successful cancer drug Velcade.
By Jef Akst
The Scientist; Published online: April 12, 2012
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The Retraction Mother Lode?
Editors at 23 scientific journals demand validation of nearly 200 studies authored by a Japanese anesthesiologist.
By Sabrina Richards
The Scientist; Published online: April 13, 2012
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Plant RNA Paper Questioned
Remarkable findings of ingested plant miRNA in animal liver and blood draw speculation about the study?s validity.
By Emily Willingham
The Scientist; Published online: April 16, 2012
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Stem Cell Researcher Fabricates Data
A scientist who claimed to have injected monkey embryonic stem cells into the eyes of rats to improve their vision accepts the penalty for research misconduct.
By Edyta Zielinska
The Scientist; Published online: April 16, 2012
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H5N1 Researcher to Defy Dutch Govt?
A virologist at the center of the avian flu research controversy says he?ll publish without government permits.
By Megan Scudellari
The Scientist; Published online: April 18, 2012
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Retractions Symptom of Flawed System
Editors, concerned about the increasing numbers of retractions, propose solutions.
By Sabrina Richards
The Scientist; Published online: April 17, 2012
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Gene Patent Stirs Controversy
A genetic testing company fields concerns that their latest gene patent goes against their ?core beliefs? regarding access to genetic information.
By Bob Grant
The Scientist; Published online: June 4, 2012
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Scientist Fabricates Cancer Data
A postdoc at Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women?s Hospital is found guilty of falsifying his findings in a lung cancer study.
By Megan Scudellari
The Scientist:  Published online June 1, 2012
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Overhauling Industry-Sponsored Studies
Major pharmaceutical companies have agreed to a handful of recommendations aimed at increasing the transparency of clinical trials they fund.
By Bob Grant
The Scientist: Published online: May 23, 2012
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Misconduct on the Rise
Retractions of scientific studies due to plagiarism, falsification, and other instances of researchers behaving badly have skyrocketed in the past decade.
By Bob Grant
The Scientist; Published online: May 21, 2012
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Notebooks Shed Light on an Antibiotic's Contested Discovery
A lab notebook belonging to Albert Schatz, left, with his supervisor, Selman A. Waksman, and discovered at Rutgers helps puts to rest a 70-year argument over credit for the Nobel-winning discovery of streptomycin.
By Peter Pringle
New York Times, Science Section; Published online: June 11, 2012
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Opinion: What?s Wrong with COI?
Financial ?conflicts of interest? should not be so quickly condemned. Industry relationships are unequivocally beneficial.
By Thomas P. Stossel
The Scientist; Published online: June 12, 2012
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Playing Fair with Industry
The American Association of University Professors releases recommendations for maintaining academic freedom while collaborating with industry.
By Sabrina Richards
The Scientist; Published online: June 13, 2012
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Opinion: Misleading Drug Trials
Amgen?s incomplete report on an early major trial of epoetin misled the medical community about the anemia drug?s risks and benefits?and helped make Amgen rich.
By Daniel W. Coyne
The Scientist; Published online: May 14, 2012
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Sanofi Thief Reprimanded
A former Sanofi research scientist is sentenced to 18 months in prison for stealing trade secrets.

By Jef Akst
The Scientist; Published online: May 8, 2012
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Dangers of Disclosure
Editors at PLoS Medicine suggest that merely disclosing conflicts of interest is insufficient and possibly even counterproductive.
By Ruth Williams
The Scientist; Published online: April 25, 2012
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Opinion: Academic Publishing Is Broken
The current system by which academics publish their scientific discoveries is a massive waste of money.
By Michael P. Taylor
The Scientist; Published online: March 19, 2012
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Space Rocks
Orbiting ultrasound machines are being used to diagnose and treat astronauts? kidney stones.
By Cristina Luiggi
The Scientist; Published online: June 22, 2012
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Parkinson's Researcher Fabricated Data
Neuroscientist Mona Thiruchelvam agrees to retract two studies linking neurodegeneration to pesticides.
By Hayley Dunning

The Scientist:
Published online: June 29, 2012
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On the Chain Gang

More than simply helping haul out a cell?s garbage, ubiquitin, with its panoply of chain lengths and shapes, marks and regulates many unrelated cellular processes.
By Keith D. Wilkinson and David Fushman
The Scientist: Published online: July 1, 2012
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All?s Not Fair in Science and Publishing
False credit for scientific discoveries threatens the success and pace of research.
By Frederick Southwick
The Scientist:  Published online: July 1, 2012
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Another Victim of Suspicious Data
The researcher who raised questions about the studies by social psychologist Dirk Smeesters flags dodgy data from another scientist.
By Jef Akst
The Scientist: Published online: July 13, 2012
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Watson Opposes Gene Patents
James Watson files a brief in the ongoing legal case over Myriad Genetics? right to hold patents on the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes.
By Jef Akst

The Scientist: Published online: July 19, 2012
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Drug Abuse Study’s Ethics Questioned
An advocacy group claims that heroin addicts participating in a Chinese study were not in a position to give their informed consent.
By Cristina Luiggi

The Scientist: Published online: August 6, 2012
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Federal Scientists File Lawsuit
Opponents of a new law requiring government researchers to publicly disclose personal financial information claim it is an invasion of privacy.
By Cristina Luiggi
The Scientist: Published online: August 7, 2012
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Immunologist Falsified Data
A researcher from the John Wayne Cancer Institute has settled his scientific misconduct case with the Office of Research Integrity.
By Edyta Zielinska

The Scientist: Published online: August 6, 2012
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Neuroscientist Falsifies Data?
An investigation of a well-known Danish brain researcher finds evidence that she misrepresented data in 15 papers, but she is refuting the findings.
By Jef Akst

The Scientist: Published online: August 9, 2012
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Pharma Whistleblower
A former manager at Genentech claims the company bypassed ethical and clinical guidelines in order to rush a promising drug through clinical trials.
By Cristina Luiggi
The Scientist:  Published online: August 16, 2012
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Sanctioned Psychiatrist Off Restriction
Charles Nemeroff, who was barred from receiving grants for 2 years in 2008, snags $401K from the NIH to study PTSD.
By Jef Akst
The Scientist:  August 14, 2012


Court Rules Gene Patents Valid
Myriad Genetics can hold patents on the BRAC1 and BRAC2 oncogenes, but not on tests comparing DNA sequences.
By Cristina Luiggi

The Scientist: August 17, 2012
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Clinical Trial Misfortune
A human trial of a hepatitis C treatment is shut down after one of the participants dies.
By Cristina Luiggi
The Scientist: August 28, 2012
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Diabetes Researcher Repeated Figures
The Office of Research Integrity sanctions a Joslin Diabetes Center researcher for fudging data in retracted papers.
By Hayley Dunning
The Scientist: August 28, 2012
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Surprise XMRV Retraction
The journal PLOS Pathogens abruptly retracts the seminal paper linking XMRV to disease.
By Beth Marie Mole
The Scientist: September 21, 2012
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Do That Again
A new initiative offers gold stars to researchers willing to have their studies replicated by other labs, but will it fix science’s growing irreproducibility problem?
By Nina Bai
The Scientist: August 15, 2012
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Confirmed Data Faker
Federal investigators find ex-Harvard professor Marc Hauser guilty of misconduct, 2 years after his colleagues did.
By Beth Marie Mole

The Scientist: September 7, 2012
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Chemist Admits to Mass Misconduct
An analyst that worked for a state drug lab in Massachusetts has confessed to mishandling evidence in tens of thousands of drug cases.
By Bob Grant
The Scientist: September 27, 2012
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Fraud Breeds Retractions
An analysis of retractions dating back to 1977 shows that most papers are retracted due to misconduct.
By Sabrina Richards
The Scientist: October 1, 2012
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Discredited Stem Cell Researcher Fired
The researcher who falsely claimed to treat human patients with their own stem cells is dismissed, but insists that he did perform the procedure on one patient.

By

The Scientist: October 23, 2012
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Ex-Official at SUNY Charged $131,000 in Personal Expenses to Foundation, Audit Finds
A former senior official at the Research Foundation for the State University of New York used his foundation credit card to pay for nearly $131,000 in hockey tickets, iPhones, Godiva chocolates, groceries and other personal expenses, according to an audit released on Monday.


A Decade of Misconduct
A senior cardiovascular disease and diabetes researcher at the University of Kentucky has been found guilty of falsifying data over the past 10 years.
By Dan Cossins
The Scientist: November 27, 2012


More Animal Welfare Problems at UCSF
Lab inspection reports and internal documents reveal incidents involving the mistreatment of research animals at the University of California, San Francisco.
By Dan Cossins
The Scientist: November 27, 2012


Embattled Ape Researcher Reinstated
A controversial primate researcher is back at work after being cleared of endangering bonobos under her care, but critics are demanding an external enquiry.
By Dan Cossins
The Scientist: November 26, 2012


'My Adviser Stole My Research' (may require password)
Two former Ph.D. students have sued their institutions over theft of their work. How common is the problem?
By Stacey Patton
The Chronicle of Higher Education: November 11, 2012


Social Psychology Damned Again
An exhaustive report about research fraud committed by social psychologist Diederik Stapel paints a picture of a field beset by sloppy practices and low standards.
By Dan Cossins
The Scientist: November 30, 2012


Should Human Genes be Patented?
The Supreme Court agrees to hear a case deciding if two cancer genes should continue to be protected by patent.
By Edyta Zielinska
The Scientist: December 3, 2012


Expensive Retraction

A publisher bills authors $650 to retract a twice-published paper.
By Beth Marie Mole
The Scientist: January 2, 2013


Festive Fraud
Two biomedical researchers have been found guilty of falsifying data.
By Dan Cossins
The Scientist:  January 2, 2013






 



 


 



 


 

 

Last updated January 4, 2013