Brooklyn Waterfront
FEATURING:

SAPNA ADVANI

Research Fellow, Brooklyn Waterfront Research Center, Brooklyn

NICHOLAS BROOKE

Chairman, Harbourfront Commission, Hong Kong

CARTER CRAFT

Principal, Outside New York, New York City

RICHARD HANLEY

Director, Brooklyn Waterfront Research Center, Brooklyn

BONNIE HARKEN

NY American Planning Association, Manhattan

PURNIMA KAPUR

Brooklyn Office Director, NYC Department of Planning, New York City

ANDREW KIMBALL

President and CEO, Brooklyn Navy Yard, Brooklyn

ROBERT A. LEVINE

President and CEO, RAL Companies, New York City

ROLAND LEWIS

President and CEO, Metropolitan Waterfront Alliance, New York City

MICHAEL MARELLA

Project Director, NYC Department of City Planning, New York City

MARTY MARKOWITZ

Borough President, Brooklyn

JACK S. NYMAN

Director, The Steven L. Newman Real Estate Institute, New York City

JONATHAN PETERS

Professor, The College of Staten Island, CUNY

SETH PINSKY

President, NYC Economic Development Corporation, New York City

RONALD L. SCHWEIGER

Historian, Borough Hall, Brooklyn

MATTHEW URBANSKI

Principal, Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates, Brooklyn

The Waterfront

A Brooklyn Model for Preservation and Change

October 26, 2011

9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

SUBJECT:This conference will explore the tensions between preservation and change that are now playing out along Brooklyn's waterfront from Greenpoint to Coney Island

EVENT LOCATION:

Brooklyn Borough Hall
209 Joralemon Street
Brooklyn, NY 11209

Event Registration:

For more than a century, the New York City region was one of this country's dominant manufacturing hubs. And due to its location on the East River and the New York Harbor, Brooklyn's waterfront was the city's industrial center with scores of maritime operations, factories, warehouses, and sugar refineries. In 2007, the National Trust for Historic Preservation highlighted some of the challenges facing development. It wrote, "...Historic dockyards and factories are being demolished by developers anxious to cash in on the area's newly hip status…and what is left of that striking architectural and historical legacy is now at risk. Also at risk are the places that make Brooklyn work, the buildings and sites that house manufacturing and industrial jobs.

"This conference will explore the tensions between preservation and change that are now playing out along Brooklyn's waterfront from Greenpoint to Coney Island. Is it possible to achieve a sophisticated preservation agenda that preserves not just buildings and physical fabric, but also the ways of life, work, and play that are associated with the physical place? How do we preserve and celebrate the historical past in the face of inevitable change? Why do we choose gradual change and reuse in one time and place, but drastic change and obliteration in another? What is the role of the economic forces in the City and region that impel change?

These questions and others will be addressed. In a morning gathering, this event will bring together different parties to include those with architectural, planning, and economic perspectives.


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