Office of the Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs

Message Archive

Friday, November 9, 2012

 

This email is being sent to all members of the Baruch College faculty.

 

For an archive of announcements sent from the Provost’s Office beginning June 2011, see http://www.baruch.cuny.edu/provost/archive.htm

 

Three Events Next week (see below for further details)

1. Wednesday, November 14, 2:30pm – Roundtable Discussion: Oral Presentation Assignment Design

2. Thursday, November 15, 3pm – Etgar Keret: The Real and the Imagined

3. Thursday, November 15, 6pm – Tim Owens: 3D Printing and Making Across the Curriculum

 

 

  • The Bernard L. Schwartz Communication Institute presents a

Faculty Development Workshop:

Oral Presentation Assignment Design

Wednesday Nov. 14, 2:30-4pm, Newman Library, 763

 

Roundtable Discussion:  Oral Presentation Assignment Design

Wednesday Nov. 14, 2:30-4pm, Newman Library, 763

RSVP to Communication.Institute@baruch.cuny.edu or 646-312-2065

 

Employers and recruiters almost invariable identify oral communication as the most important qualification for prospective employees. In this roundtable, we will discuss strategies for designing creative oral assignments that help students hone their presentation skills while also teaching important course content. We'll talk about both formal and informal presentations, helping students to overcome anxiety, and using presentations to enhance student engagement and leadership in the classroom. Participating faculty are encouraged to bring in assignments to workshop and discuss. We'll be joined by faculty members Verina Mathis Crawford (Marketing) and Helaine Korn (Management). Refreshments will be served.

 

 

  • The Harman Writer-In-Residence Program,

the Jewish Studies Center, and Hillel at Baruch College present:

Etgar Keret: The Real and the Imagined

Thursday, November 15, 3-4pm, Newman Library, 750

Etgar Keret:  The Real and the Imagined
Thursday, November 15, 3-4pm, Newman Library, 750

Etgar Keret, born in Tel Aviv in 1967, is the most popular writer among Israel’s young generation of authors. His writing has been published in The New York Times, Le Monde, The Guardian, The Paris Review and Zoetrope. Over 40 short movies have been based on his stories, one of which won the American MTV Prize. His feature film Wristcutters (2006) also won several international awards, and $9.99, based on a number of his short stories, was released to critical acclaim in 2009. At present, Keret lectures at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev. He has received the Book Publishers Association’s Platinum Prize several times, the Prime Minister’s Prize, the Ministry of Culture’s Cinema Prize, the Jewish Quarterly Wingate Prize (UK, 2008) and the St. Petersburg Public Library’s Foreign Favorite Award (2010). In 2007, Keret and Shira Gefen won the Cannes Film Festival’s "Camera d`Or" Award for their movie Jellyfish, and Best Director Award of the French Artists and Writers’ Guild. In 2010, Keret was honored in France with the decoration of Chevalier de l’Ordre des Arts et des Lettres. His books have been published abroad in 31 languages in 35 countries.

This event is free and open to the public.

 

3. The Bernard L. Schwartz Communication Institute presents

3D Printing and Making Across the Curriculum

Thursday, November 15, 6pm, NVC 14-269

 

3D Printing and Making Across the Curriculum

Tim Owens, Instructional Technology Specialist, Division of Teaching and Learning Technologies, University of Mary Washington

Thursday, November 15, 6pm, NVC 14-269

RSVP to Communication.Institute@baruch.cuny.edu  or 646-312-2065

A 3D printer is a device that can take a digital representation of an object and produce it in physical form. In the past several years, the cost of these devices has dropped significantly and a wave of innovators and tinkerers have begun to consider how such tools might be deployed in a broad range of curricula, not just in science and engineering courses. Makerspaces, locations where people can use hands-on tools like 3D printers to build physical objects, are also helping shape a new generation of students who can think critically about the world around them and are empowered to build and innovate born out of their own curiosity and learning. This session will include a live demonstration of 3D printing. Come and learn how 3D printing and maker culture can encourage students’ critical thinking and creativity across the undergraduate curriculum.