2006

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The following are abstracts of recent press, broadcast and Internet stories in which members of the Baruch community appear. Please note that the majority of these articles are available to logged-in Baruch students, staff and other subscribers through the Lexis-Nexis and Factiva databases on the Newman Library's Databases Web page. You may search for the full text of the articles using the name of the faculty or staff member, the headline of the story, or a combination of both. Some other links provided here lead to external news sites, and as such may require a subscription to be viewed in full.

 

Baruch in the Media - Archive - December 2006

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "...In the early going the trend, analysts said, suggests that Spitzer - who will
    be inaugurated during a public ceremony tomorrow - is reluctant to bring anyone into his inner circle who he has not worked with in the past...  Doug Muzzio, a political scientist from Baruch College, said the appointment
    of Cortes-Vasquez - Ramirez' former chief of staff - may fulfill a larger
    political purpose, but her credentials, including almost 13 years as a manager
    in the New York City Department for the Aging, make her a good choice.
     "There was a Ramirez connection at one point but she's perfectly acceptable," Muzzio said."
    "New Governor Spitzer Era Begins" Newsday (12/31/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "When Christine C. Quinn became speaker of the New York City Council last January, she inherited a rabble-rousing body that relished its role as heckler of the establishment...  ''Here you have a liberal Irish lesbian woman speaker working well with a Jewish Republican billionaire pragmatist mayor,'' said Douglas A. Muzzio, a professor of public affairs at Baruch College. ''The political environment has changed.''
    "Under Madam Speaker, Conflict Gives Way to Collaboration" The New York Times (12/30/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
     "CFOs are concerned about both inflation and recession, but on balance today see recession as the larger threat," said John Elliott, dean of the Zicklin School of Business at New York's Baruch College, which conducted the poll with Financial Executives International."
    "Market ends 2006 far better than analysts had predicted" The Atlanta Journal-Constitution (12/30/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "Google is also getting into new areas such as wireless services, where the
    company has little experience. That's consistent with Schmidt's aggressive
    leadership, says Robb Hecht, an adjunct professor of marketing at Baruch College in New York. "He encourages risk taking and even encourages people to fail at the company," he said. "It's usually the opposite at other companies."
    "Investor's Business Daily Chooses Google's Eric Schmidt as CEO of
    the Year of 2006"
    Investors Business Daily (12/29/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "Some think that up until now, Spitzer, who defeated Republican John Faso by 40 points in the November election, has been viewed as whoever people wanted him to be. "He's been a Rorschach test," said Douglas Muzzio, a political-science professor at Baruch College in Manhattan. "Everyone has seen in him what they want to see. There's a lot of wishing and hoping," Muzzio said. "He's like Barack Obama" - the Illinois senator considering a presidential bid in 2008 whose views on specific issues are not widely known."
    "Just how liberal is Spitzer? Only time will tell" The Journal News (12/29/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "At least on an hallucinogenic level, we have four presidential candidates,"
    said Douglas Muzzio, a political scientist at the City University of New York's Baruch College. "I don't think Pataki and Bloomberg are really serious, but it reflects the changing fortunes of the city. After 9/11, there's a lot of interest and sympathy for our candidates."
    "Today, It's New York: Tomorrow, Oval Office?; Presidential Hopefuls Abound in State" The Washington Post (12/28/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "A move to Albany for either Mr. Thompson or Mr. Carrion would shuffle the 2009 deck by removing a top Democratic contender from the field. The two could end up battling for overlapping blocs of black and Latino voters. "Nobody in the Democratic Party is really looking forward to the Carrion-Thompson primary," the dean of Baruch College's School of Public Affairs, David Birdsell, said. "That has the potential to be an enormously divisive primary."
    "In Spurning Albany, City Comptroller Sends Clear Signal on Mayoral Race" The New York Sun (12/27/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "Among New Yorkers who recall the dark days of the 1970s, former President Ford will be remembered best for something he never actually said. "Ford to City: Drop Dead," cried the front page of the New York Daily News on October 30, 1975, after the president rejected a request for a federal bailout to rescue the city as it teetered on the edge of bankruptcy... "I've got a copy of that newspaper in my house, along with the letter from the city Board of Education telling me I was laid off because of the fiscal crisis," said Doug Muzzio, who was a public school teacher at the time and is now a professor of politics at Baruch College. "It was chaos. Literally from week to week we didn't know whether the city of New York was going to go into default."
    "In New York, Ford's passing brings to mind the famous `Drop Dead'
    headline" The Associated Press (12/27/06)

  • Baruch College News
    The Alexander String Quartet's Shostokovich performances at BPAC was second on the the New York Times' classical music critic's Top Ten list for 2006. "2. The Shostakovich  centennial was celebrated by the Emerson String Quartet  at Alice Tully Hall and the Alexander String Quartet at the Baruch Performing Arts Center with competing cycles of the 15 quartets, performed in chronological order. It was a special privilege to hear the dynamic Alexander performances in Baruch College ’s intimate 176-seat auditorium. Seldom have these anguished, playful, ironic and masterly works seemed so profoundly personal."
    "The ‘Ring’ Recycled, the Met Revitalized" The New York Times (12/24/06)
     
  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "How do you persuade a group of politicians that has a 4-1 advantage
    in fundraising to surrender that in the name of reform? That's the challenge Gov.-elect Eliot Spitzer faces in trying to get the Republican majority in the state Senate to overhaul the way election campaigns are financed in New York... A political science professor from Baruch College in Manhattan was more cautious. "Something might happen," said the professor, Douglas Muzzio. "But this isn't low-hanging fruit. There has got to be a quid pro quo in there, and I don't know what that might be."
    "State Senate may be hurdle to campaign finance reform" The Journal News (12/24/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "Gov.-elect Eliot Spitzer vows to shake up Albany's insider culture, but his
    secretary of state pick has political roots that run deep. Spitzer's nominee for the plum job is Lorraine Cortes-Vazquez, a one-time chief of staff to influential former Bronx Democratic party boss and state Assemblyman-turned-lobbyist Roberto Ramirez...It's not as if [Spitzer is] nominating an inconsequential hack...She's a substantial, accomplished woman," said Doug Muzzio of the Baruch College School of Public Affairs, who has worked with her. "That doesn't take away from the fact that there is this obviously political element to the choice."
    "Spitzer chooses insider for Secretary of State" Daily News (12/22/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    Zicklin School of Business Dean John Elliott was interviewed by CNBC's Joe Kernen on the key issues concerning the nation's chief financial officers as we begin 2007. Watch the interview.
    CNBC (12/20/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    Robert Fosky, a professor of management at Baruch's Zicklin School of Business was on NPR's Marketplace as part of a story on franchising.
    "Working for the chain gang" Marketplace, NPR (12/19/06)

  • Baruch Alumni News
    "...Fortunately for the NFL, its teams and fans, Santo Labombarda of the Elias Sports Bureau and Joe Ferreira of CBS SportsLine.com possess the brainpower to deduce what no machine can...Outfitted with pens, pencils, paper, updated expanded league standings and some basic computer data about common opponents, Ferreira, 45, of Coral Springs, Fla., and Labombarda, 41, of Staten Island, N.Y., focus and project the NFL playoff possibilities each Sunday and Monday during the waning weeks of the regular season..."It probably takes a total of eight hours between Sunday and Monday," said Labombarda, who began working as a part-time researcher at Elias, the NFL's official statistician, while in high school and studied business at Manhattan's Baruch College. "But it depends on how many teams I'm looking at and how involved it is."
    "These guys break ties" The Cincinnati Enquirer (12/17/06)

  • Baruch Alumni News
    "Reverend Walter Wilson (BA,'90) describes himself as "a man who believes in hope." An African-American who struggled against the dynamics of integration, he offers his testimony in "Against All Odds: A Harlem Story," a book that has powerful implications for Black youth and men of today. Sparing no detail of his own descent into crime as a career, Wilson offers an alternative mindset, incorporating faith in God and faith in oneself, to those who may feel they have no choice but to break the law in order to survive or succeed."
    "Former 'Career Criminal' Tells the Story of His Conversion" PRWeb (12/17/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "..A Newsweek poll finds 86 percent of registered voters say they would back a qualified woman nominated by their party. For a black person, 93 percent say they would be willing to back the candidate. The survey also found Americans think their fellow citizens still are a bit reluctant to elect either. Only 55 percent say the U.S. is ready to elect a woman; 56 percent say they can see the country selecting an African-American. "You've got a real societal change," said Baruch College political scientist Doug Muzzio. "You've got a woman of national prominence and more women across the country in prominent roles, and it's the same for blacks."
    "Poll: Black candidate would have better chance than a woman" Daily News (12/17/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "...Most Iranian analysts and academics in American universities and research institutes said in interviews that they emphatically supported negotiating with Iran. Some question the wisdom of such talks right now, however, suggesting that the United States needs a long-term strategy for confronting the repressive regime rather than ad hoc discussions based on a need to extract American troops from Iraq. First, the Iranian experts reject the comparison with Hitler. President Ahmadinejad, they point out, does not control the armed forces, which lack an air force and a navy anyway. The economy is so decrepit that Iran, a leading oil producer, has to import an estimated 40 percent of its gasoline. ''It's time for a reality check -- Iran is a third world power,'' said Ervand Abrahamian, an expert at Baruch College on Iranian opposition movements."
    "How Iran's Leader Keeps the West Off Balance" The New York Times (12/17/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "Three percent. That's the breathtakingly microscopic percentage of Republican voters willing to back Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton in a head-to-head matchup against John McCain, according to the fine print of this week's Los Angeles Times/Bloomberg poll..."Hillary's been telling people that she can get some red states that Kerry and Gore couldn't," Baruch College politics professor Doug Muzzio said. "But early in the game it seems that McCain has more of a chance to expand his base than Hillary does."
    "Clinton's crossover act a tough sell" Newsday (12/15/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "Participants in a panel discussion on investment in South Asia, urged foreign investors, especially the Americans, not to ignore India, when scouting for investment opportunities. ''If you don't have India and China, you're going to lose out,'' said Anil Gulati of Coda Capital, a private equity firm.  The panel discussion, titled 'Investing in India - Opportunities and Challenges,' was held at Baruch College whose Zicklin School of Business co-sponsored the event. Rajarishi Nahata, assistant professor of finance at the college, pointed out citing some estimates that India had a 20 per cent share of world trade in the year 1800."
    "American investors urged not to ignore India" Deccan Herald (12/14/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "...Another thought came from Henry J. Stern, a former city parks commissioner, now director of a watchdog group called New York Civic. If the State Senate or Assembly removes Mr. Hevesi, or if he is forced to resign, a new comptroller will be chosen by the very politicians he is supposed to monitor. Not good, Mr. Stern wrote the other day in his organization's newsletter. ''The state comptroller is an independent elected official for a valid reason,'' he said. Douglas A. Muzzio, a professor of public affairs at Baruch College, framed the issue even more bluntly: ''Do you have a lapdog watching over you?''
    "Keeping Faith With Ethics, And Voters" The New York Times (12/12/06)

  • Baruch Alumni News
    "Bundled up in a puffy down vest, sweatshirt and thick wool scarf, Salvation Army volunteer Penny Varana (BBA, '95) seems dwarfed by the dozens of gleaming green and red donation bins surrounding her. We’re standing on the second floor of a drafty warehouse just off Sixth and Market, and the atmosphere is clearly one of calm before the storm. The holiday rush of receiving and processing toys and holiday meal boxes is just on the horizon. “We hope to fill all of these empty barrels soon, even though donations have really fallen off over the last few years,” she  notes. Penny is definitely in a position to know; she has volunteered at the Jesse Street location for five years. Ever since she was introduced to the program through a corporate employer, she has become a perennial fixture at the center, returning year after year for Easter, back-to-school clothing drives, and Christmas toy and food distributions.
    "Santa's Helper" San Francisco Downtown (December 2006)

  • Baruch College News
    Baruch College’s revolutionary use of mobile phones on campus through its AirBaruch applications was ranked 50th in Campus Technology’s special year-end issue: 101 Best Practices in Smart Classroom, Connectivity, and Administrative IT.  Using innovative technologies created by Rave Wireless Inc., students have access to unique community-building and academic applications through their mobile phones. Baruch College was an early adopter of Rave, and more than 100 other universities and colleges are currently implementing or exploring  mobile phone applications and services similar to AirBaruch. More than 90 percent of students own and/or use cell phones, and Baruch’s AirBaruch applications highlight the trend towards building a sophisticated mobile campus at higher education institutions, including large, public colleges.
    “101 Best Practices in Smart Classroom, Connectivity, and Administrative IT” Campus Technology (December 2006)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "The nation may get to see the heavyweight match that never was, now that the 2008 presidential cycle has kicked into gear and both Rudy Giuliani and Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton are moving toward running for the White House. "This is the fight of the century - this is the rematch of the fight that never happened," said Doug Muzzio, a political expert with Baruch College. "This would be the premiere - certainly for us New Yorkers, [but] even for the rest of the country. This is the fight card that everybody's looking for."
    "Hill and Rudy on the road to rematch" The New York Post (12/10/06)

  • Baruch Staff Expertise
    "...For months, Clinton was the runaway leader of the field in national polls. As Obama surged, her normally tight-lipped aides started confirming a series of people in line to be campaign manager, communications director and the like in a Clinton presidential campaign."This is the Barack Obama moment. You can't allow him to dominate the news cycle. So you're getting a much more open, talkative -- for them -- operation," said Doug Muzzio, a political scientist at Baruch College in New York City."
    "Obama draws crowds as he tours New Hampshire" USA Today (12/11/06)

  • Baruch Staff Expertise
    "Stephen Francoeur is Information Services Librarian at Baruch College's Newman Library, New York. Can a web browser make reference work a bit more efficient? Probably, if you are using the Firefox browser. For several years, the Mozilla Foundation has been releasing new versions of the open-source Firefox browser, a tool that has been quickly embraced by a growing community of volunteer developers building free extensions that can make the browser smarter and easier to use. It is these add-on programs that turn an elegant browser into a handy Swiss Army tool right at the reference desk."
    "Firefox at the Reference Desk" Library Journal (12/15/06)

  • Baruch Alumni News
    "Howard Fox (MBA, '91) dreams of one day running an online empire. But for now he's settling for three e-commerce Web sites that cater primarily to the demanding tastes of brides-to-be. "As I go through stages in life, I find new products to sell," says Fox, 38, who recently moved to Glen Rock with his wife and infant child. That explains the origins of his most profitable site, sensibleweddings.com, which he started in 2004, around the time he got married. After discovering how expensive specialty wedding merchandise can be -- products such as bridesmaids' jewelry, garters, ring pillows and personalized cake servers -- Fox created a Web site devoted solely to the small items that make a wedding day unique for the bride and groom. "I was looking for another business and I happened to buy some wedding accessories," he says. "I never thought I'd be selling garters. I'm a guy. But I've learned to sell garters and I'm now an expert on bridesmaids' jewelry." A data analyst for the city of New York with an MBA from Baruch College in Manhattan, Fox began moonlightingin e-commerce in 2000, when he and a partner opened liteach.co, an online resume database for Long Island teachers looking for jobs."
    "Web honeymoon; Entrepreneur's niche is good news for brides" The Record (NJ); NorthJersey.com (12/3/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "Under fire from police unions for prejudging the undercover cops who fatally shot Sean Bell, Mayor Bloomberg yesterday sounded a very different tune, discussing the case for 40 minutes without repeating his assessment that police used "excessive force." "We don't know what happened," Bloomberg declared on his weekly WABC radio show...While Bloomberg didn't back off any statements, he found ways yesterday to both empathize with those outraged by the shooting and to stress that cops put themselves on the line to protect the public...Doug Muzzio, a professor at Baruch College, described Bloomberg's position as "the wise thing to do." "He's already made those statements. He hasn't retracted them, so they still stand. Clearly, he's not going to emphasize it," said Muzzio."
    "Mike Holds Fire Vs. NYPD" The New York Post (12/2/06)


    View complete Baruch in the Media archive

    To submit additions to this list, or report problems, email: communications@baruch.cuny.edu.

 

Baruch in the Media - Archive - November 2006


  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "... it's easier to rise among your own as there's less discrimination and there are shorter ladders to the top, says Ryan A. Smith, an associate professor of public affairs at Baruch College at the City University of New York. Using census data and surveys to look at white, black, Asian and Hispanic managers working in mainstream businesses, Prof. Smith and co-author James Elliott discovered that managers can get trapped on a "sticky floor." That happens when they are matched with employees of their own background at the entry level of a big organization. They're hired, in part, to reduce cultural friction between the ranks. Then, the managers get stuck there if the level over their heads is more ethnically diverse. "Our study provided strong evidence that many minorities never get close enough to the glass ceiling to butt up against it because they are stuck at the bottom with no decision-making authority, or restricted to supervising other minorities," Prof. Smith said.
    "Immigrant job ghetto can turn into a Velcro rut" Globe and Mail (Canada) (11/29/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "Call it a tale of two shootings. In each, an unarmed black man is killed in
    New York in a hail of bullets fired by police, fearing, rightly or wrongly, for their lives...You learn from your errors," says Douglas Muzzio, a political analyst at the School of Public Affairs at Baruch College in New York. "The reaction reflects in part the mayor's personality and the police commissioner's professional personality, but they learned from what Giuliani did, and they're not going to make the same mistakes."
    "Police shootings and New York: lessons learned" Christian Science Monitor (11/29/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    “Within moments of the release of the New York's Commission on Healthcare facilities report, the political backlash heated up..."This provides a super structure for trying to figure out who merges with whom, who closes, who gets to continue. But there are a lot of smaller scale decisions that have to be made and there still will probably be a shortfall in medical support in New York,” said David Birdsell of Baruch College."
    "News Of Hospital Closures Prompts Political Backlash" NY1 News (11/28/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "Edward Rogoff, a professor of management at Baruch College, said he saw room in New York for small players like Joe. “People like local places,” he said. “Maybe part of the formula is just not being Starbucks.”
    "Forging a Coffee Chain Just a Few Links Long" New York Times (11/26/06)

  • Baruch Alumni News
    "The dog-eat-dog competition for pet care dollars in New York has become even fiercer with the recent launch of Ruff Runners, a service that matches competitive runners with slovenly Manhattan dogs in need of shaping up...Miss (Justinia) Holiat combined her love of running and dogs to found her company in July after graduating from Baruch College with a master's in higher education. But she is taking on a well-established competitor, Running Paws, that offers the same running services, and dog sitting and day trips to the country for cooped up dogs. She has five employees, all accomplished runners."
    "Runners Help Fat Dogs Shed Those Unwanted Pounds" The New York Sun (11/24/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "Ten Baruch College faculty and staff members will be honored in CUNY’s 2006 Salute to Scholars. In 2005-06, 231 CUNY faculty members achieved outstanding national recognition for their research, scholarship, and other accomplishments. The annual event celebrates CUNY’s extraordinary faculty while informing the larger community about their exceptional accomplishments."
    (11/22/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "A recently published research article by two Baruch College library faculty members highlights the importance of strong information literacy skills for students seeking business careers. Authored by Professors Louise Klusek, Head of Reference, and Jerry Bornstein, Deputy Chief Librarian for Public Services,  the article examines the demand for information literacy skills in today’s job market, particularly business and finance positions."
    “Information Literacy Skills for Business Careers: Matching Skills to the Workplace” Journal of Business & Finance Librarianship (11/22/06)

  • Baruch Faculy Expertise
    "The International Center for Corporate Accountability and the City University of New York are mentioned in an article discussing Freeport McMoRan's human rights program in Indonesia, along with coments by Dr. Prakash Sethi, a Distinguished Professor of Management at Baruch's Zicklin School of Business."
    "Criticism Circles Indonesian Mine" The Arizona Republic (11/21/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "AdvisorMax, (www.advisormax.com), the first complete practice management site on the web for financial planners, will launch November 22, 2006, as a one-stop destination for all the resources top financial advisors need today -- live coaching, expert discussion forums, news on products, compliance, and research -- to serve better their clients and attract new ones...The AdvisorMax coaching staff is led by Ray Sclafani, a leading industry consultant and member of the International Coaching Federation who founded ClientWISE(TM) LLC. Other leading industry experts on the coaching staff include, at launch time, Liz Manibay...the director of coaching services at ClientWISE(TM) LLC. She has more than seven years of experience as a consultant and executive coach to the financial services industry. Prior to joining ClientWISE, she worked for UBS Financial Services, where she coached top revenue-producing branch managers and financial advisor teams. Her specialty is team and leadership development, communication skills, and strategic planning. She teaches executive coaching and organizational development at Baruch College and has managed her own coaching and consulting practice."
    "AdvisorMax.com Launches as The Financial Advisor's Advisor" Marketwire (11/21/06)

  • Baruch Alumni News
    "For the first time since November of 1969, long-time sports statistician (and Baruch alumnus) Burt Beagle missed working a men's basketball game for Baruch College. Beagle entered tonight's 2006-07 season opener for Baruch having worked 930 consecutive games as the official stats scorer. He has missed only one game in the entire history of the men's program that started in 1969. Unfortunately, the streak came to an end this evening in Baruch's 74-64 home victory against Yeshiva University. Team manager Joe Caffarelli took over the book duties this evening. Beagle has been dealing with health issues, and was unable to make the trip to the ARC Arena from his home in the Bronx. The streak began when Richard Nixon started in the White House and the New York Jets won Super Bowl III. "It was the strangest thing to witness someone else in Burt's seat at press row," said Baruch Head Coach Ray Rankis. "Burt has had a tough few months and I know it must have hurt him to miss tonight's game." The streak of 930 is the longest among NCAA schools for a statistician book keeper."
    "Burt Beagle's Baruch Streak Ends at 930" Daily News (11/21/06)

  • Baruch Student News
    "Matt Soja of Baruch College, a junior from Clifton, won the City University of New York Athletic Conference men's championship. He finished first in three of four conference meets, placing second in the other."
    "Van Alstine named top freshman in A-10" NorthJersey.com (11/21/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "There are more developments in the investigation into embattled Comptroller Alan Hevesi. Governor Pataki has signed an executive order giving the attorney investigating Hevesi more power..."It's going to be very difficult for Hevesi to hold onto his office," said Baruch College professor David Birdsell."
    "Pataki gives attorney investigating Hevesi more power" Capital News 9 (11/21/06)

  • Baruch College News
    "Do voters in the home states of some potential 2008 White House contenders think their favorite sons or daughters would make a good president?..."The useful thing about this exercise is that citizens from the home state presumably know more about the candidate than most other Americans this early in the race," said David R. Jones, an associate professor of political science at Baruch College, City University of New York. Jones says the key indicator may be whether "your home state is a state that a candidate from your party would normally expect to win in a presidential race."
    "Home Cookin' Favors Obama, Clinton" CBS News (11/20/06)

  • Baruch College News
    "Reviving compulsory military service is not a smart idea, some MetroWest teens said yesterday, but at least a handful said they would not shy away from the draft if they were called. U.S. Rep. Charles Rangel, D-N.Y., during a speech yesterday at Baruch College, a branch of The City University of New York, said he will introduce a bill next year requiring Americans to sign up for a new military draft after turning 18."
    "Teens say draft would bring problems" Metrowest Daily News; "Rangel: Giuliani in 2008" Gotham Gazette; "Back to the Drafting Board" Slate; "US wary of Iran, Syria role in Iraq" The Associated Press, Houston Chronicle; "Rangel is all about the draft" Gothamist; "NY's Rangel: Push to revive military draft is call for answers" Newsday (11/20-21/06)

  • Baruch College News
    "Eight months ago, Andrew M. Cuomo gave a speech at Baruch College in Manhattan in which he called for a series of proposals to tighten ethics rules in state government.The speech on that March morning got little attention, but it heralded a major goal that Mr. Cuomo hopes to accomplish once he becomes New York State's 64th attorney general in January."
    "Cuomo to Seek Big Changes In Ethics Rules" The New York Times (11/20/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    “Home employers might frown upon associates pursuing external business interests, but not Lew Meltzer.  As managing partner of the Mineola law firm Meltzer, Lippe, Goldstein & Breitstone, Meltzer encourages the firm’s senior-level attorneys to invest themselves in outside endeavors…Meltzer Lippe’s philosophy drew associate Avi Kestenbaum to the firm in 2005. Kestenbaum serves as an adjunct tax professor at Baruch College, lectures and publishes articles in professional journals. He can spend 100 hours preparing one article – time other firms might require he devote toward the immediate bottom line. The hours spent “will not only better me, it betters the firm,” Kestenbaum said.”
    “Personal interests can be good for business” Long Island Business News (11/17/06)

  • Baruch College News
    "Public Advocate Betsy Gotbaum, working with the Baruch School of Public Affairs, gathered dozens of civic leaders yesterday to start an effort to evaluate the quality of city services. The group identified housing, traffic congestion, school safety, illegal drugs and police-community relations as among the areas in need of the most improvement. BaruchÕs Survey Research Unit plans to use those results in formulating a poll to assess Òcitizen satisfactionÓ with government services to help identify and repair those areas in need of improvement."
    "Manhattan: Evaluation of City Services" The New York Times (11/16/06)

  • Baruch College News
    "Kognito Solutions, LLC, an interactive learning company, announced today that academic institutions across the U.S. can now purchase modified versions of the online tutorial entitled "Guide for International Students." The interactive tutorial introduces students to immigration guidelines, U.S. academic customs, employment options, and school-specific services and activities, with which they will need to be familiar as they study in the U.S. Developed in conjunction with the International Student Service Center at Baruch College of the City University of New York and subsequently adopted by New York University's Office of International Students and Scholars, the 35-minute interactive tutorial organizes information into easy-to-follow topics, augmented by state-of-the-art multimedia, including animations, videos, and narration to make the material easier to understand and remember. For example, the tutorial utilizes highly-engaging Flash animations to highlight documents such as the SEVIS I-20 and the I-94 card and interactively shows students the proper way to read and fill out these forms."
    "Kognito Relases Online Interactive Guide for International Students" PRWeb (11/15/06)

  • Baruch College News
    "Most people working in the business world know what to expect when they have to attend company-sponsored leadership training. They'll file into a large conference room or lecture hall to listen to a seminar on management skills and then be required to participate in some kind of role-play where volunteers act out how best to deal with delicate work situations based on what they were supposed to have learned in the preceding lecture. A group of Baruch College students understood how awkward, embarrassing, and ineffective that type of training can be, and they wanted to start a leadership-training company that used computer games to build management skills. That idea led to the formation of Kognito, which was co-founded three years ago by Baruch alumni Ralph Vacca and Ron Goldman, just after they graduated, and the school's psychology department chair, Glenn Albright. Trying to start a company from scratch can be an intimidating task, especially for young adults right out of college. But the school tries to encourage just that with its annual Baruch College and Merrill Lynch IPO Challenge, inviting students - both graduates and undergraduates - to submit their ideas for start-up businesses. Competitions like Baruch's are increasingly becoming applicable off campus. More than mere simulations, these contests give ambitious students not only the opportunities to conceive of useful solutions to real-world problems, but also the resources to put those solutions into action. And the result is that many young adults are running their own businesses immediately after graduating from college."
    "The Starting Line: At Baruch, campus entrepreneurs scratch their itch to get businesses off the ground"  The Village Voice (11/14/06)

  • Baruch College News
    "Specialized master's programs have been proliferating lately -- everything
    from luxury-goods marketing to health-care management -- but the
    financial-mathematics degree is especially hot. Carnegie Mellon University, for example, reports a 21% increase in applications for its computational-finance master's so far this year, after a 48% jump last year...Business schools, however, aren't the most common place to find such programs. Many mathematics departments offer the degrees, as do a few engineering schools. At Baruch College in New York, for instance, the financial engineering program is housed in the mathematics department, with courses taught by a mix of academics and professionals from the financial-services industry."
    "Wall Street Warms To Finance Degree With Focus on Math" The Wall Street Journal (11/14/06)

  • Baruch Alumni News
    When Sam Quan Krueger joined the small staff of the Museum of Chinese in the Americas in September, he knew there would be no easing into the job. As chief operating officer, Mr. Krueger is responsible for coordinating the museum's move from a cramped, two-room exhibit space on Mulberry Street into a sleek new home late next year. He must also manage the millions of dollars earmarked for the expansion...The tiny nonprofit has retained renowned architect Maya Lin, who designed the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, to develop the new space...It's his job to make sure that MoCA proceeds in the right direction. Hired for his business acumen, Mr. Krueger has worked in the nonprofit sector for a decade, most recently with the United Way, helping groups in New York City develop business plans...The city has given it $2.25 million over the past three years and wants to know that the contribution is well managed...Getting it wrong is not an option for Mr. Krueger, who feels a deep connection to the museum, though he is Vietnamese...Mr. Krueger still remembers the day in 1975--in the final months before the fall of Saigon--that he, his 4-month-old brother, and his mother and stepfather, a soldier in the U.S. Air Force, were airlifted out of the country...He was later named a National Urban Fellow, which covered the costs of getting his Master of Public Administration degree from Baruch College at CUNY."
    "A Far East expansion; New COO supervises ethnic museum's big move; welcomed as calming influence" Crain's New York Business (11/13/06)

  • Baruch College News
    "Baruch College, one of the 11 senior colleges of the City University of New York, has also had success attracting money from grateful alumni, a process that was begun in earnest during the late 1990s after state financing for the institution began to decline. Bernard M. Baruch, the Depression-era financier and presidential adviser, endowed Baruch College with $9 million in 1953. But by 1998, the college's endowment had barely budged. Now, however, the endowment stands at $100 million, thanks to a throng of alumni who appreciate the education they received at Baruch...''Most of the donors are not shy about saying that they may have gone on to law degrees at Harvard and other degrees at Columbia, but they give back to Baruch because without Baruch they would not have gone on at all,'' said Kathleen M. Waldron, Baruch's president. ''These are primarily men and some women who came from the Bronx, Queens and Brooklyn, who took the subway to college who could only go to Baruch because it was free.'' One major donor is Lawrence Zicklin, a former chairman of Neuberger Berman, the money management firm that is a subsidiary of Lehman Brothers. A Baruch graduate who wanted to give back to the institution that gave him his start, Mr. Zicklin donated $18 million in 1998 to build the Zicklin School of Business at Baruch... ''You learn how to be hungry at Baruch,'' he said. ''You learn how to scratch.''
    "Aiding the Schools That Gave Them  a Chance"  The New York Times (11/13/06)

  • Baruch Student News
    "Student Gustavo Agosto-DaFonseca has just published an op-ed article in the Spanish-language newspaper El Diario de la Prensa that focuses on the limited educational and career opportunities available to young people like him in NYC and the tempting option of joining the military as a reservist as a way to pay for college. However, he also says that if he had known of the other options availabe at CUNY beforehand he may have taken a different route. He speaks very highly of CUNY as an institution and of the support he has received here."
    "Mi paso por el ejercito"   El Diario (11/13/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "...Before leaving for a post-election vacation in Florida this week, Nick Spano, like Kelly, said he would await a recount of the votes in the 35th state Senate District before acknowledging the official results. But political experts say the campaign also may be tinged with fallout- and perhaps bitter feelings - from the close election battle between Spano and Stewart-Cousins two years ago. "Nick Spano is pressing it," said Doug Muzzio, a political science professor at Baruch College. "There is probably no way conceivable that a recount will pull him more than a couple of hundred votes. So, to a certain extent, this is ... simply a case of chop-busting." "This is the second time he's gone head-to-head with this woman," Muzzio said. "He barely beat her last time, and he's going to torture her a bit. In this case, I think at a certain point it becomes vindictive and it becomes really a case of sour grapes."
    "Election recounts: Sour grapes or hoping for champagne?" The Journal News (11/11/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "Stephen Minarik took over a state Republican Party hanging off a cliff. He may soon leave it near rock bottom. After Republicans were swept by Democrats in all statewide races, some GOP leaders and political experts estimate it may only be a matter of weeks until Minarik leaves the state job...The outspoken Minarik also at times sparred with GOP leaders, including once saying early in the campaign that Faso was in "la-la land," a quotation that Democrats brought up over and over again during the campaign. "He's consistently overpromised and underperformed and does it in a way that antagonizes people," said Douglas Muzzio, a political science professor at Baruch College."
    "Minarik takes heat after GOP debacle " The Journal News (11/10/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "Mayor Michael Bloomberg said yesterday he expects the New York congressional delegation to "bring home the bacon," now that Democrats control the House and Senate...As a top-ranking member of the Transportation Committee, Rep. Jerrold Nadler of Manhattan will have tremendous influence over the transportation budget, which New Yorkers hope will lead to more funding for infrastructure upgrades, such as the expansion of Staten Island bridges or a new Hudson River express tunnel. Bloomberg's message yesterday was clearly meant for lawmakers like Nadler, said Doug Muzzio, a professor of public affairs at Baruch College in Manhattan. "The fact that the mayor put them on notice right away is good," he said. "We haven't gotten what we deserved for too long. And we've been loyal voters."
    " 'Bring home the bacon,' mayor tells the Dems" Staten Island Advance (11/9/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "Pirro's loss brought at least a temporary halt to a political career that was dogged in recent years by controversies and missteps..Analysts expressed doubt yesterday whether she could ever rebuild her political career. "Politicians have this Lazarus-like quality but the resurrection doesn't always happen," said Doug Muzzio, a political science professor at Baruch College in Manhattan. "The image and narrative of this campaign was pretty negative."
    "Pirro lost Westchester in A.G. race" The Journal News (11/9/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "By the end of the day, half a dozen anti-Minutemen protesters are under arrest, one for allegedly spitting in a cop’s face...The only other deviation from the script occurs when a large figure dressed in an alien get-up walks nonchalantly past the scene, heading towards Park Avenue. En route to a movie shoot nearby, the invader quiets the crowd momentarily. Hector Cordero-Guzman dashes after the figure, hoping for a picture. He returns huffing. “I asked him if he was a legal alien, and he told me yes,” he recounts when he returns. Cordero-Guzman, who is Puerto Rican and chair of the Black and Hispanic Studies Department at Baruch College, grins widely. “I guess they have special exceptions too, like me. Only in New York!”
    "Immigration Hysteria Hits Gotham" The Brooklyn Rail (11/8/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "Sen. Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) emerged from the war over the Senate as the Democratic Party's newest hero for his drive to take the Senate back from the Republicans... Doug Muzzio, a political analyst at Baruch College, said, "There is the possibility of a full-blown, all-out war" to block the GOP from scheduling votes on any bills - such as controversial security programs - that might make Republican candidates look good in the 2008 races."
    "Dems hail Chuck as new star in fight to 'take country back' " Daily News (11/8/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "Giuliani and Hillary Clinton and everybody else have been making the goodwill trips and debt-obliging trips," the dean of Baruch College's School of Public Affairs, David Birdsell, said. "They are doing things that people will owe them for come 2008. In some sense they are already in campaign mode, the question is when the declarations come."
    "Clinton, Bloomberg, Giuliani Get Set To Shift Into High Gear for 2008" The New York Sun (11/8/06)

  • Baruch Facutly Expertise
    "Following his long-expected landslide win Tuesday, Gov.-elect Eliot Spitzer promised to make good on his lofty campaign pledge to reform Albany by doing away with its entrenched culture of gridlock, finger-pointing and petty partisanship. It won't be easy. Spitzer has set the bar unusually high - a fact underscored by his "Day One, Everything Changes" slogan. Supporters and critics alike will undoubtedly seek to hold him to the promise. "He's coming in with such high expectations that even an elected official of his intelligence and drive and direction is going to find it difficult to do it all," said Douglas Muzzio, a Baruch College political science professor. "He's promised a lot."
    "Now, Spitzer faces real challenge" The Times Union (11/8/06)

  • Baruch College News
    "In taking more responsibility for preparing its future leaders, Springfield is hardly alone. Many urban districts have created their own training regimens for administrators in recent years. What makes Springfield different is the extent of the authority it’s been granted. In almost all other states, candidates in district-run programs can only get licenses for administrative positions if they also matriculate at a college or university. New York City’s 3-year-old Leadership Academy, for example, has a partnership with Baruch College that lets participants get a state credential."
    "Mass. District Steps Into Licensing Role for Administrators" Education Week (11/8/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "Eliot Spitzer scored a resounding victory in the governor's race Tuesday night, crushing his Republican opponent and returning the state's executive branch to Democratic control for the first time in 12 years. The expectations are incredibly high on him, so I would expect that he's going to be extraordinarily active the first 100 days, and it will set the tone for the next four years _ and perhaps more than that," Doug Muzzio of the Baruch College School of Public Affairs said. "He's made lots of promises, both financial and otherwise, and it's going to be interesting to see if he can deliver on them."
    "Spitzer wins governor's race in N.Y." Daily News (11/7/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "Mr. Spitzer and Mrs. Clinton are listed on today's ballot on both the Democratic and the Working Families line, along with the other Democratic candidates for statewide office. A vote on either label would count toward the candidate's total, and leaders in the Working Families are hoping a large turnout by left-leaning voters could send a message to top Democrats who are primed to take office...Working Families got 90,533 votes in the 2002 gubernatorial election, a little more than half the total of 176,848 ballots for the Conservative Party, which has largely cross-endorsed Republican candidates. With a stronger slate of Democrats running this year, the Working Families Party has a decent shot at overtaking the Conservatives, the dean of the School of Public Affairs at Baruch College, David Birdsell, said."
    "Working Families Party Comes Out for Spitzer, Clinton" The New York Sun (11/7/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "Josh Mills, a SABEW board member who joined Bloomberg News this summer to start up its reporting of the world of education and how it intersects the business world, has left the wire service and is returning to Baruch College, where he previously taught journalism. In an e-mail Mills said, “There are lots of great journalists there [at Bloomberg]. I’m impressed with a lot of the markets, finance and corp coverage. And I’m grateful that Matt Winkler and his team gave me the chance to see how well I could fit in. Baruch College/CUNY was kind enough to offer to take me back, and asked me to helped build the best undergrad journalism program in NYC. It’s a good challenge, and puts me back doing what I love most — training young journalists and then sending them out to all of you.” 
    "Mills leaves Bloomberg and returns to Baruch" Talking Biz News (11/6/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "Bass Pro store could shake local outdoor" retailers. Although fewer
    Americans are outdoor enthusiasts these days, Bass Pro, based in
    Springfield, Mo., is on an expansion binge with a mix of scale,
    showmanship and unrivaled stock that shoppers drive hundreds of miles to buy..."It's the Starbucking of outdoor recreation retailing," said City
    University of New York marketing professor Robb Hecht
    . Chains like Bass Pro and competitors such as Cabela's Inc., based in Sidney, Neb., are
    responding with the sprawling megastore approach because the stores' sheer
    spectacle can create new enthusiasts and steal customers from other
    retailers, Hecht said. "The local stores lose," he said, "and the megastores win."
    "Reeling in Shoppers" The Sacramento Bee (11/6/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "...That such an overwhelming percentage of likely voters cite the war in Iraq as "very important" (78 percent) or "somewhat important" (16 percent) to their voting decisions spells trouble for Republicans in the middle of an incumbent president's second term, analysts say. The poll's margin of error for likely voters was plus or minus 3 percentage points. "That number says in big, gold letters, 'Bad News For Republicans,'" said Doug Muzzio, a political scientist at Baruch College. "If that large a percentage of the electorate sees the war as critical to their votes, it's going to be a blue tsunami."
    "A war at the polls" Newsday (11/6/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "...Fifty years after the invention of the standardized container revolutionized the freight industry by making the worldwide delivery of goods easier and cheaper than ever before, architects and entrepreneurs have found new uses for them. The room-size boxes are being made into artsy stores, galleries, schools and homes. That’s welcome news in some quarters: The sharp increase in imports and the low cost of new containers have led to a glut of rusting, unused containers that are creating a junkyard nightmare for many port and factory towns.  But not all communities have welcomed cutting-edge architecture made of the industrial-issue containers. “Containers are sturdy and plentiful, but would the costs and stigma be worth re-using them?” said Barry Hersh, an associate director of the real estate program at Baruch College."
    "Shipping containers: from eyesore to architecture" azcentral.com (11/6/06)

  • Baruch Student News
    "Tumbleweed is not exactly blowing through the nation’s student unions just yet, but digital has transformed the very essence of how college students meet and greet, form and manage friendships. From left, Victor Chu, Jessica Baptiste, Max May, Liana Harper and Diana Calle met on the campus of Baruch College in Manhattan. They share an interest in the arts, and are in constant touch through text, pictures and videos on the networking sites Facebook and MySpace. But they gather in real space maybe only three times a month."
    "Buddies at Baruch" The New York Times (11/5/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "We asked three money mavens about what Tuesday's election mean to the economy. Robert A. Schwartz, economist and professor of finance at Baruch College's Zicklin School of Business: "The market never likes uncertainty. If the Democrats prevail, there will be some initial uncertainty about what will happen."
    "Markets Election Watch" The New York Post (11/5/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "It was expected to be among the state's most competitive races, pitting Westchester's former district attorney against a former federal housing secretary and the son of one of New York's most famous governors. As it unfolded, though, the race between Republican Jeanine Pirro and Democrat Andrew Cuomo for state attorney general seemed, more often than not, to be all about the Pirros. "It was prime-time soap opera," said Doug Muzzio, a political science professor at Baruch College in Manhattan. "It was primarily a Pirro soap opera. Forget about the attorney general's race, it began with the Senate race and her blowing it up with the 32-second gap. And then it got worse."
    "Pirro's gaffes sink her in polls" The Journal News (11/4/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    Rep. Peter King may win his election Tuesday and still lose big: If his Republican party can't keep its majority in the House, he will give up the gavel atop the Homeland Security Committee..."On a basic level, if Democrats get control of the House, it benefits all the Democratic members, and hurts all Republican members, but among the Republicans, Peter King has to be at the top of the list, because of that chairmanship," said Doug Muzzio, a politics professor at Baruch College."
    "NYC-area lawmakers' positions of power at stake in election" The Associated Press; Newsday (11/4/06)

  • Baruch College News
    "Ask anyone who has been through it, and they will tell you that getting a business idea to become a reality can be taxing. But, a New York City college is offering help, for free. NY1’s Cheryl Wills filed the following report...But Gaby Sherrow, of Gaby’s Granola, confronted the same question that roughly 600,000 Americans face every year when they decide to start a business. "How do I take something that I thought about, at work or at home, and bring it to the world at large?” asked Sherrow.  To find the answer, Sherrow went to the Lawrence Field Center for Entrepreneurship at Baruch College. The center offers one-on-one advice and weekly seminars to entrepreneurs. The services, which have been available for more than a decade, are all free of charge.  "A lot of the people who come in here don't have a lot of money to spend to get professional services to get them to start a business that's why there here,” said Edward Rogoff, the academic director at the Field Center. “If we can help them avoid a mistake or identify a good opportunity in a meeting or two, it's time and money well spent."
    "Local College Gives Free Counseling To Entrepreneurs" NY1 News (11/3/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "...Some attributed that judgment  on Hevesi's part to an arrogance  of power they see in the  comptroller. Part of it's arrogance and hubris,  and part of it's, if not a pattern of questionable behavior, instances of  it, a professor of public administration at Baruch College, Douglas  Muzzio, said of Hevesi's lapse."
    "Scandal Could Derail New York Comptroller" The Forward (11/3/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "(Article author) David R. Jones is an associate professor of political science at the City University of New York, Baruch College..."In the wake of the Mark Foley congressional page scandal, Congress' already dismal job performance ratings are at their lowest point during an election season in more than a decade — just 29 percent in the most recent CBS News/New York Times poll. But what effect, if any, will low congressional approval ratings have on Election Day?"
    "Will Anger At Congress Sway Voters?" CBS News (11/2/06)

  • Baruch Staff News
    The New York Times' Tech Talk segment featuring Karen Gourgey of Baruch's Computer Center for Visually Impaired People and the Talking Tactile Tablet, for which Karen was just awarded a patent, is now posted on The New York Times' Web site at and is also available through iTunes. Karen appears in the second segment which runs roughly ten minutes. 
    (11/2/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "Vice President Cheney gleefully reminded conservative supporters about Sen. John Kerry's botched joke yesterday. "Aren't we lucky he lost that election?" the veep cracked during a campaign speech in Montana..."Kerry's timing was perfect, if you're a Republican. It didn't just remind Republicans why they don't like Kerry, it reminded a lot of Democrats, too," said Baruch College political scientist Doug Muzzio."
    "Botched joke draws veep laughs" Daily News (11/2/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "We'll never really know if Marie Antoinette said "Let them eat cake." But we'd certainly know if she made that infamous (and perhaps fictional) political gaffe today: The video would have thousands of YouTube hits within an hour. Which is why, analysts say, Sen. John Kerry's much-quoted remarks on education and Iraq, which he apologized for Wednesday, show that now more than ever, danger lurks when a politician strays off script. And it shows that successful politicians (and their staffs) must hone a few crucial skills: listening to yourself speak, and correcting a mistake the minute it happens. Because if you wait any longer, "the toothpaste is out of the tube, and you can't push it back in," says Douglas Muzzio, professor of public affairs at Baruch College in New York. "You can't have a do-over."
    "Kerry's gaffe, and others like it, show need for self-editing" The Associated Press; The Washington Post; KHOU; Calgary Sun (11/1/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "If polls are correct, the closest race this election season may be for state comptroller, with Republican Christopher Callaghan trying to use the scandal surrounding Alan Hevesi to catapult past the Democrat..."It's not going to be a referendum on Callaghan at all,” said Doug Muzzio, a professor of public affairs at Baruch College. “It's all Alan Hevesi. It has almost nothing to do with Callaghan." Muzzio also said Callaghan's lackluster debate performance against Hevesi last month might also be a reason to focus on his opponent rather than his own record. "He wasn't very effective in that debate at all,” said Muzzio. “So he's gotta make the issue Hevesi."
    "Callaghan and Hevesi Launch New Ads Before Election Day" NY1 News (11/1/06)

  • Baruch Facutly Expertise
    "Politicians and their operatives are no dummies. YouTube might have
    started out as a site for ordinary people to post their own videos, but it
    is now well seeded with videos produced by candidates -- both focusing on
    themselves and on their opponents. Consider YouTube, says Robb Hecht, an adjunct marketing professor at the City University of New York's Baruch College and social tech media strategist. "Its role in this year's elections cannot be underestimated,"he tells the E-Commerce Times. "While people need to tune into CNN, they also need to check out YouTube's vault of political videos and sites like WhereIStand.com to find out where [the politicians] stand on issues."
    "An Alternative Guide to Election 2006" E-Commerce Times; TechNewsWorld (11/1/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "Faso is also handicapped by the times. Republicans are struggling across New York. The war in Iraq is unpopular. Pataki recently registered the lowest approval rating ever for a New York governor in the Marist College poll. And in "a certain sense," Faso is running on a Pataki-like platform of tax cuts while saddled with Pataki's record, said Doug Muzzio, a Baruch College political science professor. "It's just the wrong time for John," Muzzio said."
    "Long-shot Faso maintains hope on the trail" Utica Observer-Dispatch (11/1/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "Today's two-way brand economy-where consumers can talk about your brand to anyone who will listen, via blogs, podcasts and more-has spurred the rise in CIOs, says Robb Hecht, chief innovations consultant for the imc strategies lab and adjunct professor of marketing at Baruch College in New York City..."Marketing used to include one-way media," says Hecht, referring to TV, radio and billboards and the like. "The CIO arose when technology met  marketing. A CIO [encourages] consumers to accept marketing messages and become part of the marketing process...CIOs [develop] productive and innovative killer apps that attempt to maintain 'control' of brands in an atomizing economy," says Hecht. "A CIO anticipates where potential customer threats or concerns will arise and heads them off."
    "The New CIO" Entrepreneur Magazine (November 2006)



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Baruch in the Media - Archive - October 2006

  • Baruch College News
    "Business schools have largely ignored the burgeoning trend of aging baby boomers starting their own businesses. Baruch's out to change that. Its Lawrence N. Field Center for Entrepreneurship convened a forum of experts yesterday to define "later-life entrepreneurship" - meaning business creation by the 50-plus crowd - as a field of study. "We need to find out - what are the needs of this population?" said academic director Edward Rogoff. The conference wasn't open to the entrepreneurs themselves - but next spring, their day will come. The center will host entrepreneurship fairs for over-50s."
    "50 & blazing own biz trail" Daily News (10/31/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "John Spencer, who hopes New Yorkers might one day call him senator, last week became the guy who called Hillary Clinton ugly... Despite plunging polls numbers, Spencer isn’t giving up...“Being on the losing end of what looks like a very, very wide margin is rarely a good way to start a political career,” said David Birdsell, dean of Baruch College's School of Public Affairs. “You wind up with no national support, no state party support and very little prospect except sitting around and hoping that the Clinton campaign blows up.”
    "John Spencer: The Tough Guy from Yonkers" Resident Publications (10/30/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "Historian and professor Carol Berkin addressed approximately 150 high school students at Arcata High School on Friday morning. Berkin is a professor of history at Baruch College in New York, and is the author of many historical books and has been involved in numerous Public Broadcast Systems and History Channel documentaries. Humboldt State University professor Dee McBroome said Berkin is “one of the most pre-eminent colonial historians we have today,” and that Berkin has extensively researched the American Revolution from both the loyalist and patriot perspectives. McBroome said Berkin highlights the role of women in history, and strives to project history as realistic."
    "Historian addresses Gilder Lehrman students in Arcata" The Eureka Reporter (10/28/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "The race for New York governor has been surprising for its lack of surprises. Democrat Eliot Spitzer commanded a big lead from the moment he announced and hasn't stumbled since..."It's been a race utterly without drama," said Baruch College political science professor Doug Muzzio. "That's the way the Spitzer people planned it and that's how it worked out."
    "Campaign 2006: Spitzer's lead keeps governor's race quiet" Rochester Democrat and Chronicle (10/28/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "New York's junior senator has raised nearly $38 million for her reelection
    bid against her little-known Republican challenger, John Spencer, and political
    analysts say she can stop spending money and still win in a landslide. A
    professor of public affairs at Baruch College, Douglas Muzzio, said "she could give her opponent a few million dollars and still win in a landslide."
    "Team Clinton Campaigns on Senator's 59th" The New York Sun (10/27/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "But Bloomberg, a Republican, has refused to take a position in any of New
    York's major political contests, where the GOP candidates are decided underdogs... Bloomberg explained that he has to work with whomever gets elected. It would be imprudent, he said, for him to express his personal views in New York State races. Doug Muzzio, a professor of public affairs at Baruch College, said the mayor isn't being candid about his reasons for staying out of the statewide races. "The stated rationale is bull," Muzzio said, suggesting that the mayor is staying silent because Democrats figure to be "landslide winners."
    "For Mike, All Politics Isn't Local" Daily News (10/27/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "The state comptroller's wife is being driven around on the taxpayer's nickel? That's an old story for Jay Weiser. He says he used to see the same thing when he was a boy going to Public School 268 in East Flatbush, Brooklyn...Professor Weiser -- he teaches real estate law at Baruch College -- recalls that a big black car bearing the license plate of a high-ranking state official swung by the school most afternoons to pick up Mrs. Levitt and chauffeur her. Back then, that sort of practice raised few, if any, eyebrows. ''The general approach of our imperial class is to grab as much as they can and hope they don't get caught,'' the professor said."
    "Politics Reborn As Soap Opera Of Family Woe" The New York Times (10/27/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "It is the prosecutorial Pirro -- smart, tough, sometimes a little bit hectoring -- who has been most on display during the campaign, especially during the debates and at news conferences and speeches. At a forum where Ms. Pirro and Mr. Cuomo both appeared (separately), ''She was much more the factual prosecutor,'' said Douglas A. Muzzio, a professor of public affairs at Baruch College who moderated the event. ''Andrew's more conceptual and broader, but Jeanine showed that she could speak on her feet.''
    "On a Trail of Ill Fortune, Pirro Camp Perseveres" The New York Times (10/27/06)

  • Baruch College News
    "The Weissman Center for International Business of Baruch College has just updated its NYCdata web site. This updated version is a well designed site which provides access a wealth of data about New York City.  It is arranged into 16 chapters with a tremendous amount of detail in each. According to the description, "all the neighborhoods in the five boroughs, all the museums, colleges, art galleries, theatres are included.  Most of these have links to their own home pages..." Also included are ethnic groups, languages, newspapers, major firms by business, and major sports teams."
    "Baruch College Updates NYCData Web Site" New York Supreme Court Criminal Term Library (blog) (10/26/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "With big bucks and a big name, U.S. Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton is headed toward a second term with New York voters saying they will back her whether or not she leaves to run for president in 2008..."She's strong," said Douglas Muzzio, Baruch College professor of public affairs at The City University of New York. "She is a truly national politician in the way nobody in New York is."
    "Hillary Clinton faces likely re-election in NY" Reuters; The Washington Post ; Gulf Daily News (Bahrain) (10/26/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "New York Attorney General Eliot Spitzer, the Democratic candidate for governor, withdrew his endorsement of Comptroller Alan Hevesi for re-election. .. ``Spitzer just put another bullet in,'' said Douglas Muzzio, a political scientist at Baruch College in Manhattan. ``Even if he wins the election, I've got to believe that a resignation is in his future, if not removal if he refuses to resign.''
    "New York's Spitzer Pulls Support for Hevesi Campaign" Bloomberg.com (10/26/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "Embattled State Comptroller Alan Hevesi went face to face with his Republican rival on NY1 Wednesday, trying to stave off calls for him to step down from office, and as NY1's Molly Kroon reports, he had to appeal to voters' sympathies and dip into his personal life to try to fight for his political one..."He needed to come out aggressively to defend a position that he is going to portray as the right position to defend his wife to meet state ethics standards, etc., regardless of the conclusion of the ethics commission. And that's a position that he has to sustain for at least the next two weeks, arguably through January 1st," said David Birdsell, dean of the School of Public Affairs at Baruch College."
    "Hevesi Gets Personal In Comptrollers Debate" NY1 News (10/26/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "Actor Michael J. Fox is nailing GOP candidates for fighting stem-cell research that could potentially cure his Parkinson's disease - but they say his attack is just "Spin City." In jarring new TV spots running in three races, Fox zings President Bush and Republicans for holding back scientific research that the star says could eradicate diseases such as Parkinson's, Alzheimer's and diabetes. The national GOP's hesitance to attack Fox directly means "they understand the power of the ads," said Baruch College political analyst Doug Muzzio. "It's giving me goose bumps, his personal view is so powerful," Muzzio said."
    "Flak for Michael Fox Over Stem Cell Ads" Daily News (10/25/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "Mexican phone giant Telmex is expected today to announce the purchase of a group of Spanish-language phone directories based in the U.S. It could be a very smart move, Ashley Milne-Tyte reports... Andy Grein teaches marketing and international business at New York City's Baruch College. He says Telmex intends to keep these customers even as they migrate to a digital world..."And at the same time, you can sort of look at the trajectory of how this demographic is gonna develop, and think you know one day these people will be quite well off and they'll also be online."
    "Telmex coming over the border" Marketplace (10/24/06)

  • Baruch College News
    "Alumnus Roger Hertog ‘65, director and Vice Chairman of the AllianceBernstein Corporation, has donated $1 million over the next four years to expand the number of undergraduate honors scholars at Baruch College. The gift is the largest in the history of the College’s Honors program.  The gift will fund a group of students within the Honors program who will be known as Hertog Scholars in recognition of the donor’s generosity."
    (10/24/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "New York Comptroller Alan Hevesi violated state law by improperly using a government employee as a chauffeur for his wife without paying the state, the state Ethics Commission charged...Hevesi may survive the election and still be forced from office, said Douglas Muzzio, a political scientist at New York City's Baruch College. ``It ought to be Hevesi being a dead man walking,'' Muzzio said. ``I don't know how he stays in office with a finding of a violation of ethics, the possibility of criminal charges,'' Muzzio said. ``Once it gets into the legal system, public opinion doesn't matter because the rules of the game are much more rigorous and much more formal.''
    "New York's Hevesi Violated Ehtics Lawes, Panel Charges" Bloomberg.com (10/24/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "The State Ethics Commission ruled Monday that State Comptroller Alan Hevesi violated New York law by failing to reimburse the state for using a staffer as his ailing wife's chauffeur... Hevesi is seeking re-election as the state's chief financial officer and an aide says he is not resigning. It's still too early to see what this ruling will do to his re-election bid, but a recent poll showed Hevesi with a huge lead over Callaghan. One local expert says Hevesi's chances for re-election are still strong. Dean David Birdsell, of Baruch College's School of Public Affairs, says the comptroller has a larger network of support and enjoys more name recognition than his challenger. “This is obviously a very serious charge, a very serious problem. The only reason why it's not going to make more of a difference in the election is the vast distance in this case between the Republican and Democratic candidates for state-wide office,” said Birdsell."
    "Ethics Commission Says Hevesi Violated State Law" NY1 News (10/23/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "Senator Clinton's Republican challenger, John Spencer, said yesterday that the New York senator would make a "tremendous" candidate for president in 2008, but criticized her stance on Iraq, votes against tax cuts, and the rest of her record in Congress.Mr. Spencer, the former mayor of Yonkers, used his airtime in the second and final Senate debate to cast Mrs. Clinton as an opportunist using the Senate as a springboard to the White House...The dean of the public affairs school at Baruch College, David Birdsell, said Mrs. Clinton did a solid job. "One of her goals here is to rack up as many Independent and moderate Republican votes as she can," Mr. Birdsell said. "John Spencer is a good person to do that against because he appeals to more rock-ribbed conservatives."
    "Spencer, In Debate, Denies Hating Clinton" The New York Sun (10/23/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "...Spitzer has been accused of trying to threaten and intimidate those he has targeted as attorney general, raising protests from opponents that his temperament is unfit for governor...That prosecutorial personality can be effective as a government leader, but it can also create a backlash, as Rudolph Giuliani found out early in his tenure when he clashed with leaders when he made the switch from prosecutor to New York City mayor, some political observers said. Politics requires more compromise than the courtroom, they added. Spitzer is "very aggressive, he's very smart, he knows what he wants and he doesn't like people getting in the way," said Douglas Muzzio, a political science professor at Baruch College in Manhattan. "It's not a bad trait, and if it's an intelligent toughness it's a good thing. But it can't be a blind toughness."
    "Spitzer's image as crusader at stake" Rochester Democrat and Chronicle (10/22/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "Robert Schwartz  is the Marvin M. Speiser Professor of Finance at Baruch College, CUNY..."Why do we need middlemen in financial markets?..."For small orders and big-cap stocks -- the plain-vanilla stuff -- with electronic trading and order management, you really don't need the traditional services of an intermediary. Even retail customers can handle their own orders of that stuff…and the trading platform keeps records and does trades. The computer becomes the intermediary, and the computer doesn't charge as much. "But for big orders and any-sized orders for small- and mid-cap stocks, intermediaries are needed. When you get away from no-brainer trades, trading remains a complex process, and the intermediaries have a role to play."
    "Death of a Middleman" The Wall Street Journal Online (10/22/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "FROM BIKINIS: Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive,
    but what they conceal is vital.
       -- Aaron Levenstein, professor emeritus at Baruch College"
    "Quotes" The Vancouver Sun (10/21/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "New York State Attorney General Eliot Spitzer won two big legal victories yesterday. It's good news for a man who's hoping to be New York's next governor, Ashley Milne-Tyte reports. Douglas Muzzio teaches public affairs at New York City's Baruch College: "It simply reinforces the dominant image and the narrative about Eliot Spitzer that he is the Sheriff of Wall Street and he is protecting the people from people like Grasso and corporations like CBS and others."
    "Two down, one big win to go for Spitzer" Marketplace (10/20/06)

  • Baruch College News
    "Enrollment at The City University of New York reached its highest levels in more than three decades this semester, and administrators reported that applicants to the colleges are more qualified than ever before. CUNY reported that 226,213 students were registered at its campuses this semester, a 2.5 percent increase over last September when there were 220,727 students, the highest total since 1975. Significantly, almost 19,995 students transferred to CUNY colleges from other institutions of higher education, an 8.7 percent increase last year when 18,399 chose to switch to CUNY...The improvements in the academic backgrounds of applicants can be seen across the board. The number of those admitted to the top-tier colleges — Baruch, Brooklyn, City, Hunter and Queens — with averages of 85 or better increased by 9.6 percent this year. Those with averages of 90 or above grew by 11.8 percent. Chancellor Matthew Goldstein said he is pleased with the numbers, which confirm that CUNY is increasingly recognized as the place where a high quality education can be obtained."
    "CUNY has record enrollment" Queens Tribune (10/20/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "A PR blog fiasco. A defunct community site. And now a holiday site that's incited a child advocacy backlash. Can Wal-Mart do no right online?
    The Campaign for a Commercial-Free Childhood has launched a petition against the mammoth retailer's new holiday toy site, claiming Wal-Mart ToyLand prompts kids to nag their parents into buying them over priced or inappropriate toys..."Certainly this online strategy to, in effect, annoy parents is going to close the wallets of the parents who were supposed to open them," noted Robb Hecht, marketing consultant at the imc strategy lab and adjunct professor of marketing at Baruch College. This is especially the case, he added, "if the reinforcement to nag is not coming from a kid down the block, but from a Wal-Mart branded Web site any parent could visit, and discover the culprit."
    "Will Recent Online Flubs Hurt Wal-Mart's Brand?"
    ClickZ News (10/19/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "A big developer purchased Stuyvesant Town yesterday for a whopping $5.4 billion. Alex Goldmark looks at what's next for Manhattan's last bastion of middle class housing... Professor of Real Estate at Baruch College, John Goering, says that new ownership won't change rents right away because most of the 11,000 units are protected by rent stabilization laws."
    "Stuyvestant Towners movin' out?" Marketplace.org (10/18/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "San Francisco mayor Gavin Newsom is dating a 20-year-old model and restaurant hostess. In some cities this might trigger a major controversy, but not in the Bay Area...And why would a young woman be interested in dating a man almost twice her age, even if he is the mayor. It's all about the power, baby. "What makes him more appealing is how much power he wields," says Carol Berkin, a political historian at Baruch College, who points out that Confederate leader Jefferson Davis was 38 when he married a 17-year-old girl. "What gets the heart beating fast is that he's got a chauffeur or that he's the top man in San Francisco. This is what women have been conditioned to find attractive."
    "Golden Boy Newsom Dates 20-Year-Old" abc7news.com (10/18/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "Queens Democrats stood in solidarity with Assemb. Brian McLaughlin yesterday, praising him as a "stand-up guy" whose personality differs sharply from the portrait of a corrupt politician and labor leader painted by federal
    prosecutors...Doug Muzzio, professor of public affairs at Baruch College, said McLaughlin was a major player in city politics and in the labor movement, and was liked by most people."
    "Defending 'stand-up' guy" Newsday (10/18/06)

  •  Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "The Power To Persuade: FDR, The Newsmagazines, And Going To War, 1939-1941 by Micheal G. Carew (Assistant Professor Of Economics at Baruch College, New York) is the true story of the roul four magazines played in generating support for America's involvement in World War IIagainst the Nazi-led Axis. At the time, the magazines "Life", "Look", "Newsweek", and "Time" reached over 40 million readers--almost 50% of America's electorate, mostly middle to upper class. By the end of November 1941, enough of the formerly anti-war opposition hand changed their opinions and joined Roosevelt's electoral consensus. The Power To Persuade scrutinizes how a nation could go from neutrality to active participation in the war against the Axis in two short years, drawing on a wealth of compiled data presented in various charts. Appendices packed with even more statistics and bibiolography round out fascinating insight into a crucial phase of American history."
    "The Power To Persuade; Brief article; Book review" Reviewer's Bookwatch (Fall 2006)

  • Baruch Alumni News
    Baruch alumnus Trevor Edwards, Nike’s VP of global brand and category management was quoted in a piece on the company’s Digital Marketer of the Year Award. “Naming Nike Digital Marketer of the Year almost welcomes the charge of unoriginality…But don’t hold that against the Beaverton, Ore-based shoe and apparel giant. Its pioneering work is redefining interactive marketing, taking advantage of the web as a medium for commerce, brand extension, relationship building, and conversation starting…”We create demand for our brand by being flexible about how we tell the story,” says Trevor Edwards, VP-president, global brand and category management. “We do not rigidly stay with one approach…We have an integrated marketing model that involves all elements of the marketing mix from digital to sports marketing, from event marketing to advertising to entertainment all sitting at the table driving ideas.”
    “Who’s leading the way in web marketing? It’s Nike, of course” Advertising Age (10/16/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "Prop 85 on the November ballot would require doctors to notify parents at least 48 hours before performing an abortion on a minor. Some in the medical and legal community have serious reservations about the measure. But supporters maintain it makes sense for parents to be involved in their children’s medical decisions...Thirty-five states have parental involvement laws on the books. A recent study sheds some light on the effects of such measures. Economist Ted Joyce, from Baruch College at City University of New York, is the study’s lead author. His research looks at changes in abortions and births caused by the parental notification law in Texas. It took effect in 2000."
    "Abortion Notification Measure Back on Ballot" KPBS (10/16/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "Trailing in the polls and entangled in a federal investigation, the Republican candidate for attorney general, Jeanine Pirro, attacked her opponent yesterday, saying Andrew Cuomo is unqualified to be the state's top lawyer...The dean of the school of public affairs at Baruch College, David Birdsell, said Ms. Pirro was "plainly on the offensive" and "highly articulate," but that her negative approach could be seen as extreme. Mr. Birdsell said Mr. Cuomo is clearly trying to avoid making waves in the final three-week stretch of the campaign."
    "Pirro Goes on the Offensive In First Debate Against Cuomo" The New York Sun (10/16/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "Eliot Spitzer was at another of a thousand campaign stops, this time a gay pride dinner, sitting over the banquet steak he was not going to eat. Then he rose to mingle and chat, in rare candor, about where he is in his life...The question now is whether a man who has been an attorney and prosecutor for most of his life, a man who has never fully probed the engines of government, can transform himself from a litigator to the shepherd of 19 million diverse sheep. The job of attorney general is measured on a case-by-case basis, through settlements and convictions -- tangible victories. Governors face ever-changing crises where success is difficult to measure. "What can be an advantage as a prosecutor can be a disadvantage as an executive," said Doug Muzzio, a political scientist from Baruch College. "It's not juggling two balls. It's juggling 15 balls and the balls are conscious actors."
    "Can Spitzer go from lawman to shepherd?" Newsday (10/15/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "Jeanine Pirro gets the opportunity she has craved for weeks: a debate tomorrow against her Democratic rival for attorney general and the chance, perhaps, to remind voters that there's more to her than just controversy... "If it is her last best chance, it is a real slim reed," said Doug Muzzio, a political science professor at Baruch College in Manhattan. "It is doubtful that anything that happens in the debate, unless Andrew foams at the mouth, will make that big a difference."
    "Pirro aims to refocus spotlight" The Journal News (10/14/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "Unless Republican John Faso raises a lot of money fast, he could wind up being the lowest-funded gubernatorial candidate in New York since 1990... The reason Faso is having a hard time, many agree, is the polls... “There’s a very pragmatic element to contributing,” added Baruch College political scientist Doug Muzzio. “When you’re consistently 30, 40, 50 points down ... you’re not going to invest.”
    "Faso could be lowest fund-raiser since '90" The Ithaca Journal (10/13/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "Both state attorney general candidates have enough marital drama to launch a miniseries. But when Republican Jeanine Pirro and Democrat Andrew Cuomo square off on Sunday for their first televised debate, they must prove they are politically savvy and above the personal fray to win, experts said... Pirro needs him to make a major gaffe during debates to score points with voters, said David Birdsell of the Baruch College School of Public Affairs. "[Pirro's campaign] is like a baseball team who knows they can still win a World Series but has to wait for the other teams to lose to get in the playoffs.. . . This year, he is very well-coached," said Birdsell."
    "AG Rivals Urged to Rise Above Messes" Daily News (10/13/06)

  • Baruch College News
    "Federal Reserve Gov. Fredric Mishkin Thursday noted that big China holdings of U.S. assets and U.S. Treasuries is not a "good long-run situation." Mishkin said it is better for China to develop its own solid trustworthy financial institution, keeping the money in China. Mishkin spoke in the context of a speech, reported earlier, in which he advocated more capital flows into emerging market economies such as China. The speech marked Mishkin's first public speech as a new Fed governor. He chose the location of Baruch College because his father Sydney graduated from there and also had an art gallery on campus named in his honor."
    "Mishkin Q&A:China Should Develop Own Strong Fin Institutions" The Main Wire (10/13/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "The Democratic front-runner for Attorney General, Andrew Cuomo, has refused to weigh in on the Pirro investigation since the story broke two weeks ago. Federal investigators are looking into whether Pirro wiretapped her husband to find out if he was cheating. Cuomo is leaving it to his supporters to condemn Pirro. “It's very unlikely Andrew Cuomo will ever say anything about Jeanine Pirro's personal life,” said David Birdsell, of Baruch College. Birdsell said it is a textbook strategy. “He wants to keep hands off,” said Birdsell. “Have as many other people as possible saying as many damaging things as possible about Jeanine Pirro and not touch that subject himself."
    "Cuomo Avoids Pirro Issue, Finds Support from Schumer" NY1 News (10/11/06)
  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "There was enough Democratic star power to light up an auditorium - but party stars Sen. Hillary Clinton and Eliot Spitzer weren't playing to a big crowd yesterday. Instead, they chose a Long Island living room for their first official joint campaign event, chatting about property taxes and schools... Doug Muzzio of the Baruch College School of Public Affairs said Clinton and Spitzer were capitalizing on the chance to join forces and expand their base of support. "They both want to win big and they both want to appeal to Republicans," Muzzio said. "This is a homey way to do it."
    "GOP Stop for Eliot and Hil" Daily News (10/11/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "The state would be better off if a single party didn't control the entire government - and so might the nation, Mayor Bloomberg suggested yesterday in a shot at the GOP in Washington... "It sounds like he's taking a slap at Republicans," observed Baruch College Professor Doug Muzzio."
    "Mike A '1Party' Pooper; Zings GOP Rule" The New York Post (10/11/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "Four years ago, some deemed Alan Hevesi's election as state comptroller a
    consolation prize after his last-place finish in the 2001 Democratic mayoral
    primary in New York City. But as Hevesi, 66, of Forest Hills, seeks re-election against an unheralded Republican challenger in next month's election, he speaks as if he's found his dream job... "It was Lazarus-plus," said Doug Muzzio, a professor of public affairs at Baruch College. "Not only did he rise from the dead but he rose to a higher place in heaven."
    "ELECTION 2006; Hevesi's own Cinderella story" Newsday (10/11/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "Twenty-five years after the courts first allowed states to prohibit teens younger than 18 from having an abortion without a parent's knowledge, Oregon remains among a few states with no such law. Measure 43, on the November ballot, would require a parent to be notified 48 hours before a 15-, 16- or 17-year-old daughter could have an abortion. The state Legislature and voters have defeated similar proposals in the past. As Oregonians once again consider such a law, what, if anything, could they learn from other states? ...Those teens who did not tell their parents were typically older -- 16 and 17. Their biggest concern was hurting or disappointing their parents. Yet 30 percent said they did not tell their parents because they feared violence would occur or they would be forced to leave their home. Among the most recent studies is a 2006 report published in the New England Journal of Medicine. Theodore Joyce, a professor of economics and finance at Baruch College, City University of New York, looked at Texas, which began enforcing its parental notification law on Jan. 1, 2000."
    "State enters debate over abortion, parent role" The Oregonian (10/10/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "...Plagiarism on U.S. college campuses is on the rise. Of 51,611 undergraduates surveyed in a 2005 study by Duke University's Center for Academic Integrity, 37 percent admitted copying Internet material without attribution, compared with 10 percent in 1999. Yet less than 20 percent of Georgetown's faculty members use the plagiarism detection software, Turnitin.com, that's made available to them and that flagged the history paper. About half of the 4,140 colleges and universities in the U.S. -- including the entire Ivy League -- don't use commercial programs, according to the software makers...At Baruch College at the City University of New York, only about 75 of 400 faculty members use Turnitin, says Gerard Dalgish, acting director of the writing program. Some teachers don't receive papers in electronic form -- a requirement for using a detection program -- while others prefer checking questionable sections on an Internet search engine like Google, he says. Dalgish used Turnitin to catch two plagiarists in a linguistics course in 2005. He failed them and reported them to the dean of students."
    "Ivy League Shuns Anti-Plagiarism Tool as U.S. Cheating Rises" Bloomberg.com (10/10/06)

  • Baruch College News
    "More than a quarter, or 28%, of companies had made changes or were
    considering making changes to their company's retirement plans as a result of
    the Pension Protection Act of 2006, according to a new survey of chief financial officers. The survey's findings from the third-quarter 2006 CFO survey showed that executives weren't wasting any time in adjusting their retirement plans. The CFO survey was released Oct. 3 and was conducted by Financial Executives International, an advocacy group for corporate financial management based in Florham Park, N.J., along with Baruch College's Zicklin School of Business in New York."
    "CFOs mull changes" Investment News (10/9/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "To the Editor:  Re ''Who's Afraid of Shinzo Abe?'' (Op-Ed, Sept. 30):
    Yoshihisa Komori and his newspaper have been lauding Prime Minister Shinzo Abe for standing up to China because Beijing has not accepted Japan's 20-plus formal apologies for its wartime transgressions.  Mr. Komori did not mention that Mr. Abe and his ruling party have steadfastly opposed Japan's formal apology for imperial Japan's aggression and atrocities... But he and his ruling party have refused officially to atone for the hundreds of thousands of Koreans, Chinese and others who were systematically abducted by imperial Japan as its soldiers' sex slaves and forced laborers. Two years ago, it was revealed that in 2001, Mr. Abe, then a deputy cabinet secretary, forced Japan's public broadcaster (NHK) to drop the airing of the proceedings of the Women's International War Crimes Tribunal of the United Nations Human Rights Committee. The tribunal found imperial Japan guilty of committing mass abduction of Korean sex slaves.
    Yoshi Tsurumi
    Scarsdale, N.Y., Oct. 4, 2006
    The writer is a professor of international business at Baruch College."
    "Japan's New Leader" The New York Times (10/7/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Michel Martin in Washington. A conference in New York begins tomorrow to celebrate the life of a woman
    many have never heard of, but whose legacy is essential to understand who we are now. Harriet Jacobs was born into American slavery in 1813. She escaped 23 years later and went on to tell her own story. David Reynolds is a distinguished professor of English at Baruch College and the graduate school of the City University of New York. He's also author of a recent biography, John Brown, Abolitionist: The Man Who Killed Slavery, Sparked the Civil War and Seeded Civil Rights. He joins us from our New York bureau."
    "Slave Narratives, Then and Now" NPR (10/5/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "Immigrants have always been the backbone of the Sunset Park community. As Sunset Park grows and changes, more members of the community are undocumented immigrants who face increasingly complicated struggles. In response to the growing alarm among local service providers, Center for Family Life helped to organize a coalition of local organizations to begin to address the needs of the undocumented members of the community...On May 23, 2006 the Sunset Park Coalition for New Immigrants hosted the Sister Mary Geraldine Symposium on Immigration Reform: National Challenges and Local Responses, our first major public event...Other panelists included: Hector Cordero-Guzman, professor at CUNY Graduate Center and Baruch College, Tarry Hum, professor at Queens College-CUNY, and Reverend Terry Troia, Executive Director, Project Hospitality." Center For Family Life in Sunset Park (10/5/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "Just imagine the power of the AOL brand once it gets every employee
    focused on the one big goal of building the world's biggest and most
    engaged audience based on brand utilitarianism," says Robb Hecht, adjunct
    marketing professor at Baruch College
    and owner of the blog Media 2.0, where he analyzes business branding issues. "AOL owns and operates
    [instant messaging service] ICQ. It owns and operates Mapquest, Netscape,
    Moviefone, Weblogs, Cityguide, and AOLmusic.com. And, now it has other
    non-AOL branded media properties such as In2TV, TMZ, and Engadget that are all hits. If AOL gets its brand right, AOL could re-establish itself as
    the 'go-to' social online media property it was originally destined to
    be."
    "The Rise & Fall (And Rise?) of AOL" Techweb (10/4/06)

  • Baruch College News
    "Baruch College is an outstanding business school, according to The Princeton Review.  The New York-based education services company features the school in the just-published 2007 edition of its “Best 282 Business Schools.” 
    (10/4/06)

  • Baruch College News
    "In a recently released paper by The Education Trust, an independent nonprofit organization advocating high academic achievement, Baruch College was singled out as the only large, four-year college in the country with 50 percent of the student body receiving Pell Grants–an indicator of significant financial need–and a six-year graduation rate of more than 50 percent. Titled “Degrees of Access: Policies that Restrict College Opportunities for Poor and Minority Students,” the paper highlighted Baruch for successfully implementing measures that improved graduation rates from 35.5 percent in 1998 to 53 percent in 2004.  Today, Baruch’s six-year graduation rate stands at 58.7 percent."
    (10/4/06)

  • Baruch College News
    "Despite reported recession fears, CFOs’ economic optimism dropped only slightly in the third quarter to 67.6, compared to 68.6 in the second quarter, according to the “CFO Outlook Survey,” conducted quarterly by Financial Executives International (FEI) and Baruch College’s Zicklin School of Business. Company-specific optimism declined even less, to 75.5 from 76.3 last quarter." (10/3/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "The city's political calculus could be affected for years to come by a sharp
    increase in the proportion of its homes that are owner-occupied, experts are saying in the wake of new United States Census figures. A professor of public affairs at Baruch College, Douglas Muzzio, said the numbers show growth in New York's "bourgeoisie" and a "stabilizing middle class" that he says is spreading to the outer boroughs. He said the demographic shift could have "profound policy implications." "They don't like property taxes, they like services. If they are homeowners, they are more likely to have kids and want better schools," Mr. Muzzio said. "They would be conservative on things like property taxes, but not necessarily on all dimensions of social policy."
    "New York Politics Could Feel Impact of Home Owners" The New York Sun (10/3/06)       

  • Baruch Alumni News
    “He’ll get to talking about innovations, yes, but first, Trevor Edwards needs to make one thing clear: “I have one of the best jobs in the world,” he said of his post as VP-global brand and category manager for one of the most revered marketing organizations: Nike. “We get a chance to stay connected to young consumers. That’s what helps me stay energized every day.” Mr. Edwards, 44, leads brand management for the Beaverton, Ore.-based sports-equipment-and-apparel behemoth, a company with revenue of $15 billion and an overall demand-creation budget-for advertising, promotions, endorsement contracts-of $1.7 billion in fiscal year 2006…Mr. Edwards joined Nike in 1992 after spending seven years at Colgate-Palmolive, and he brings to his post a globetrotter’s perspective. Born in London, he moved to Jamaica when he was 14. From there, he went to New York to attend Baruch College
    “The Innovators: CMO Strategy - Trevor Edwards" Advertising Age (10/2/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "Baruch College professor Robb Hecht put it this way: "The power of brands is what attracts people to marketing. Most marketers want to work on the biggest brands, brands [with sales] the size of some countries' gross national products. Many marketers, once behind the dashboard of driving a brand, feel the power of the reach of a brand."
    "Inside the Mind of the Marketer" Brandweek (10/2/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "...As enrollment in university accounting programs across America continues to climb, firms are looking to implement creative recruiting strategies. The American Institute of CPAs reported a 19 percent increase in enrollment and the number of graduates - 53 percent of whom are women - in accounting programs from 2000 to 2004....Of course, pay is also a key factor in choosing a firm, said Doug Carmichael, accounting professor at Baruch College in New York and former chief auditor at the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board. But being flexible and feeling "at home" is just as important. "I try to find out what students are interested in doing. I tell them a personal chemistry with a firm is important," he said. "If you go somewhere and you have a sense that you feel at home, that's definitely the place to go."
    "Time for a new poster?; Recruiting strategies have to change with the times" Accounting Today (10/2/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "Mutual fund giant Fidelity Investments isn't practicing what it preaches on a controversial shareholder-rights issue. The Boston-based financial firm says it generally supports efforts to get companies to adopt so-called cumulative-voting procedures. Yet Fidelity doesn't seem to actually cast its votes in favor of these proposals. Rather, it regularly abstains from voting on plans that support it...(professor of accountancy) Burton Rothberg, who co-authored a study on mutual fund voting for Baruch College's Zicklin School of Business in 2004, said abstentions for shareholder-sponsored proposals could also be interpreted as a form of approval."When a big one like Fidelity abstains it means something it means they're not giving their support" to management, he said. "Let's face it, the default vote is to vote for management, and if they don't, it means something."
    "Fidelity's voting record, policy at odds on shareholder voting reform" AFX; The Associated Press; Dow Jones Newswires; The Houston Chronicle; The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (10/2/06)

  • Baruch College News
    "Sound and enthusiasm pulsed through Columbia University's Roone Arledge Auditorium last Saturday as students came together to enjoy dancing, poetry and live music at Latino Heritage Month's Semi-Formal and Cultural Showcase. Caban also praised the Student Government Association for its help with coordinating events. Of the 17 acts that performed, 14 were Columbia student groups, while three were from outside organizations. She also emphasized the addition of "more obscure cultural groups" that performed, including Bolivian folklore dancing and cumbia by Baruch College's Por Colombia."
    "Show kicks off Columbia U. Latino Heritage Month" University Wire (10/2/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "Economist Erik Sirri, a former official of the Securities and Exchange
    Commission, has rejoined the regulator as its new director of market regulation... Robert Schwartz, a business professor at Baruch College in New York City, applauded the appointment. "Erik Sirri is a well-experienced economist who has excellent credentials," he said. "He is well respected because he has lots of experience in micro market structure."
    "Free-Market Economist Sirri Named to Head the SEC's Division of Market Regulation" Traders Magazine (September/October 2006)

  • Baruch College News
    "The Wall Street Journal rankings are based on ratings from recruiters and list UConn as 51st, just after the Universities of Illinois, Colorado, and South Carolina, and Baruch College of the City University of New York."
    "Business school enters Wall Street Journal rankings" UConn Advance (10/2/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "Elizabeth L. Wollman — a former editor for Playbill Magazine who is currently an assistant professor of music at Baruch College — has penned a new book tracing the history of the rock musical. Entitled "The Theater Will Rock: A History of the Rock Musical, from Hair to Hedwig," the 288-page tome, published by University of Michigan Press, is set to hit stores around the country Nov. 20. "The book," Wollman recently told Playbill.com, "began as my doctoral dissertation in ethnomusicology, which I got from the Graduate Center, CUNY, in 2002. I have since revised it significantly — the book version is much less academic, stylistically, I hope, and thus much more accessible than the dissertation was."
    "Wollman's "The Theater Will Rock: A History of the Rock Musical" Due in Stores in November " Playbill.com (10/2/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "Jeanine Pirro's plot to catch her husband in an affair by bugging the family boat — and the federal investigation that has resulted from it — might ordinarily be viewed as an outlandish event for a political race. Even in New York. But in some ways, it's just another strange occurrence in an election cycle that's been full of them. And some of the Lower Hudson Valley's best-known politicians were key players..."You wind up with this psychodrama with Spencer and McFarland during the spring and summer," said Doug Muzzio, a political science professor at Baruch College in Manhattan. "It has been a very strange year."
    "For Pirro, it was a very bad year" The Journal News (10/1/06)

  • Baruch College News
    “College: A Mecca of Multiculturalism – These New York and New Jersey schools had the largest number of minorities in the class of 2005: Rutgers University (New Brunswick, NJ) 2,094; CUNY Bernard M. Baruch College (Manhattan, NY): 1,218…”
    “The College Diversity Explosion” CollegeBoundTeen.com (September/October 2006)


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Baruch in the Media - Archive - September 2006

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "Doug Muzzio, a professor of public affairs at Baruch College, said Jeanine Pirro has succeeded until now in largely sequestering her husband's foibles from her political quests. But he said this latest scandal is the nail in the coffin because it raises serious questions about Pirro's behavior after she approached former New York City Police Commissioner Bernard Kerik, a disgraced figure himself, about bugging her husband. "
    "The Husband Factor; Tough mix of love and politics" Newsday (9/30/06)

  • Baruch Alumni News
     "A physician in Morris County owned six stocks. All pharmaceuticals. Two of them were -- good grief -- Pfizer and Merck. He had taken a huge hit. He couldn't understand why. "They're great companies, with great people and great drugs," he lamented. He consulted a certified financial planner, James W. Reilly of RegentAtlantic Capital in Chatham, who told him that great companies can have overpriced stocks -- just as lousy companies can have under-priced stocks... Reilly grew up on Staten Island. He graduated from the University of Notre Dame and received his MBA from Baruch College."
    "Why physicians are such poor investors" Daily Record (Morristown, NJ) (9/29/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "Avi Z. Kestenbaum Senior associate, Meltzer, Lippe, Goldstein & Breitstone. Working in the firm's tax, trusts and estates and tax-exempt organizations groups, Kestenbaum helps for-profit and not-for-profit entities. The frequent lecturer has published numerous articles in tax and estate planning journals and developed an expertise in charitable planning and taxation of charitable organizations. Kestenbaum is also an adjunct tax professor in Baruch College's MBA program."
    "Ones to watch: Long Island legal community" Long Island Business News (9/29/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "In addition, the silence of President Bush about Mr. Koizumi's repeated
    visits to Yasukuni Shrine contributed to the rise of "authoritarian
    conservatives such as Mr. Koizumi and Mr. Abe, and continued to let them pander to the Yasukuni neoconservatives who openly deny Imperial Japan's wartime atrocities and aggression," said Yoshi Tsurumi, professor of international business at Baruch College, City University of New York. "From the Chinese point of view, Mr. Bush has fueled a conflict between China and Japan." By remaining silent, Mr. Bush helped create the tensions in East Asia, Mr. Tsurumi said. "That is hurting the national security leadership of the U.S. in the region."
    "Japan rethinks military role under new head; Abe seeks to step up U.S. ties" The Washington Times (9/29/06)

  • Baruch College News
    "The Zicklin School of Business at Baruch College has been making major changes to its accounting program in the past two years, with an eye on the calendar. It's been adding new accounting courses and redesigning internships feverishly to prepare for the new CPA prerequisites that will go into effect on Aug. 1, 2009.  New York is one of the last states to embrace this national trend--requiring that students with an undergraduate degree complete an additional 30 credit hours before they can sit for the CPA exam..."There will be a lot of consequences in the next three years, as well as a significant adjustment period for firms, students and schools," says John Elliott, Zicklin's dean . "Not everyone is completely happy about the change." Accounting graduates have usually been hired after just four years of education. Now, many firms are worried that students will spend an extra year in school, creating a hiring void for a few years. To prevent this problem, schools and firms are designing flexible programs to run summers, nights and even online. Such courses will allow students to complete the extra credits while working."
    "Schools, firms cram in extra CPA credit hours" Crain's New York Business (9/28/06)

  • Baruch College News
    "The Accontancy isse of Crain's featured an article on the stability of the profession which included a mention for Baruch. "The average entry-level salary at top-tier firms for those with an undergraduate degree rose more than 10% this year, to $52,000, according to consulting firm Robert Half International Inc. Top graduates from Baruch College were offered starting salaries of $57,000 last year, reports Masako Darrough, chairman of the accounting department at Baruch's Zicklin School of Business."
    "Calculating a future in accounting" Crain's New York Business (9/28/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    “Each issue of “History Now” addresses a major theme or figure in American history with an interactive feature, articles by historians, lesson plans for teachers, links to related websites and bibliographies. Of course, for many students, mention of ‘The West' conjures up popular stereotypes: macho cowboy heroes, Indians in warpaint, gunfights in saloons or wagon trains filled with pioneer families,” said Carol Berkin, “History Now” editor and professor of History at Baruch College and City University of New York Graduate Center. “These images, powerful and simplistic, come from movies and television and adventure books. But modern scholarship has given us a much more complex, realistic—and more interesting—history of the American west."
    "UNM Historian Contributes to ‘History Now' Issue on the American West" UNM Today (9/28/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "Dr. Shoshanna Sofaer, the Robert P. Luciano Professor of Public Policy in Baruch’s School of Public Affairs, has been awarded a grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to study nursing quality measures with patients and consumers."
    (9/27/06)

  • Baruch College News
    "The 2006 edition of the Wall Street Journal/Harris Interactive Business School survey has ranked Baruch’s Zicklin School of Business one of the top 50 regional business schools in the country. The result marks the first time that Baruch has been included in the list, and follows a recent Princeton Review/Entrepreneur magazine poll that ranked Baruch among the top 25 undergraduate entrepreneurial programs in the country."
    (9/26/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "The BlackBerry -- which started life as a simple-to-use, dedicated email device -- has caught on from the U.S. to Europe to India and China amid a proliferation of mobile-communication options. But there was one gaping void in the BlackBerry universe: Japan. That changes today, when NTT DoCoMo Inc., Japan's biggest mobile-phone operator, begins marketing the BlackBerry's latest incarnation to business users. Research In Motion Ltd. starts selling the advanced BlackBerry 8707h in Japan, with the ability to read email in both Japanese and English (or other languages using the Latin alphabet)...Indeed, unless Research In Motion comes out with cooler versions, Japanese consumers aren't likely to latch on, says Robb Hecht, a marketing professor at Baruch College in New York and a technology-branding consultant. Compared with Japanese cellphones, he says, "BlackBerries are clunky and large."
    "Arriving Late, Can BlackBerry Hook Japan's Mobile Market?" The Wall Street Journal (9/26/06); Pittsburgh Post Gazette (9/27/07); The Associated Press (9/27/07)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "Higher education can help people get out of poverty but, writes Lynne Weikart of Baruch College, a number of barriers, from high tuition to welfare rules, keep New Yorkers out of college."
    "The Many Faces of Poverty" The Gotham Gazette (9/25/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    Robb Hecht, an adjunct professor of marketing in Baruch's School of Continuing and Professional Studies, was quoted recently."Robb Hecht, brand blogger of Media 2.0, an IMC Strategies consulting blog, stresses the importance of including blogging and social networking into any paid media advertising buys your business makes. "Earning the endorsement of past and potential customers online via business blogging can drive a lot of credible traffic to your Web site," he says."
    "Advertise Creatively And Successfully" MasterCard Small Business Portal (9/25/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "Gavan Fitzsimons (Duke's Fuqua School), Patti Williams (Penn's Wharton School), and Lauren Block (Baruch's Zicklin School) are marketing professors, and their study of the effects of asking questions about behavior was published in the June edition of the journal, Social Influence.The professors looked at two types of behavior: exercise and illegal drug use. At the beginning of the study they asked sample groups that included 167 undergraduate students how likely each was to exercise and how likely they were to take illegal drugs. Two months later, the students who had been asked about their exercise intentions reported that they exercised 15.7 times, on average. The students who hadn't been asked about their exercise plans reported exercising only 11.8 times. Illegal drug use followed a similar, if more alarming, pattern. The students who had been asked about it reported drug use averaging 2.8 times over the two months, compared with 1.1 times for those who had not been asked."
    "Surveys may influence our actions, good or bad" The Herald (Washington) (9/24/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "In a political event that will be must-see TV, NY1 is sponsoring the first debate in the U.S. Senate race between Senator Hillary Clinton and her Republican opponent former Yonkers Mayor John Spencer."A candidate doesn't necessarily have to debate in a primary where there's not a perception of a legitimate challenge," said David Birdsell of Baruch College. "However, when you have both of the major parties in a general election contest, it's very very difficult if not impossible to duck a debate, without appearing to be a less serious candidate -- a candidate who has something to hide."
    "Hillary Clinton Agrees To Debate Opponent John Spencer On NY1" The Hillary Project (9/23/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "In the 1770s, King George III was convinced that all of the problems with his
    colonies could be laid at the feet of "that brace of Adamses" and the rebellious
    mobs of Massachusetts men. As it turned out, he was wrong--not only about the widespread nature of American discontent and desire for independence, but also about the gender of many of his Massachusetts opponents. Abigail Adams, as much as her husband John, supported an American revolution, and rebellious crowds of Massachusetts women picketed the shops of merchants who broke the boycott, staged mass spinning bees to show their solidarity with American resistance to British taxation, and served as spies for the American army. And, after independence was won, women played a central role in ensuring that the republic would survive."
    "It was I who did it": women's role in the founding of the nation" Phi Kappa Forum (9/22/06)

  • Baruch Alumni News
    "Philanthropist, financial advisor and investment manager William E.
    Macaulay is giving $30 million-the largest donation in the history of The City
    University of New York- for the purchase of a building in a landmark district on Manhattan's Upper West Side that will become the permanent home for the CUNY Honors College, and to add support to its endowment, Chancellor Matthew Goldstein announced today. Mr. Macaulay is Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of First Reserve Corporation. Specializing exclusively in the energy industry, First Reserve is one of the ten largest private equity firms in the world with $12.5 billion under management, including $7.8 billion in its most recent fund, Fund XI...  Mr. Macaulay, a 1966 Honors graduate of City College, where he majored in Economics at what is now Baruch College, is a member of the CUNY Business Leadership Council." US State News (9/21/06)

  • Baruch College News
    "Technology has found its way into college campuses everywhere, and now, a new idea is putting all that tech in the palm of your hand. It's called "Rave Wireless," and its helping keep students on time and helps them save time. "We only have commuting students and so their time on campus is very limited, so they need help in managing it…so we've designed a number of our Web-based services now to be delivered to them on their cell phone," said Baruch College Chief Information Officer Arthur Downing. At Baruch College, it's simply called "Air Baruch," and it is catching on with the student population. "At the moment we have 3,700 users out of the student body of 15,000, so pretty much across the board it has gained wide acceptance," Downing said."
    "Tech Styles: 'Air Baruch' Takes College Mobile" WCBS-TV (9/21/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "They want to take this guy out," said Doug Muzzio, a political science professor at Baruch College in Manhattan. "They want to come out of this general election with momentum. They want to bury this guy. They want devastation. They want a total blowout." Muzzio described Spencer as "almost the ideal foil" for Clinton because of his staunchly conservative views. By attacking Spencer and making him seem like an extremist, Clinton can position herself as a centrist. "If they could have invented a candidate to run against Hillary Clinton, they probably couldn't have invented a candidate better than John Spencer," Muzzio said."
    "Clinton campaign aims to squash foe" The Journal News (9/21/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "In celebration of Constitution Day, Sybil A. Schwarzenbach, Ph.D., will present, "Women and the United States Constitution," from 7-9 p.m. on Sept. 27 in the Flohr Lecture Hall of Shawnee State University's Clark Memorial Library. Schwarzenbach's book, "Women and the United States Constitution: History, Interpretation and Practice," will be on sale starting at 6 p.m. on the day of the lecture at the rotunda in front of Flohr Lecture Hall and she will be available during that time for autographs. Schwarzenbach is associate professor of philosophy and women's studies at the City University of New York, Baruch College and the CUNY Graduate Center. She has been a Fulbright Scholar in Heidelberg, Germany, received her Ph.D. at Harvard, and was a recent visiting scholar at the Stanford Humanities Center in California."
    "Women, the Constitution focus of presentation" Huntington Herald Dispatch (9/21/06)

  • Baruch College News
    "...Doctor Leonel Fernandez hosted a conference for Hispanic students at Baruch College of the City University Of New York, to whom he explained the process of modernization of the different state dependencies impelled by his Government."
    "President Fernandez shares lunch hosted by the Secretary General of the UN with heads of state and global leaders" Presidencia de la Republica Dominicana; "Fernandez participa en la almuerza de Annan" Hoy Digital (9/20/06)

  • Baruch College News
    "Entrepreneur magazine and The Princeton Review have named Baruch’s Zicklin School of Business one of the nation’s best schools for undergraduate entrepreneurial education, according to their recently-concluded annual ranking of such programs. The survey, which included more than 700 colleges and universities across the nation, rated Baruch 18th in the top 25 undergraduate schools for entrepreneurship. "Baruch's students are, in my opinion, the most entrepreneurial in the country," said Edward Rogoff, academic director of the Field Center for Entrepreneurship and a professor at the Zicklin School. "Many of them already have their own businesses, or want to own their own business, when they come here."
    (9/18/06)

  • Baruch College News
    "With colleges throughout the city welcoming back students for the fall semester, Reps. Anthony Weiner and Carolyn Maloney are touting a plan to combat the rising costs in higher education. "The combination of inadequate Pell Grants and high interest rates for Stafford Loans saddle college students and their families in New York," said Mr.Weiner at a press conference yesterday in front of Baruch College in Manhattan."
    "Lawmakers Pushing for Increase In Pell Grants for College Students"  The New York Sun (9/18/06)

  • Baruch Student News
    "At the heart of the Barnes and Nobles in Manhattan’s Union Square, the nine-bookcase section, “Self-Improvement,” sits in between its cousins, “Psychology” and “Addiction/Recovery.” Next to me is a man wearing a beige tunic and Velcro sandals. Vegetables from the farmer’s market across the street protrude from his black backpack. I ask him if he reads other self-help books. “I don’t normally read books like this,” he said. He clarified that he likes to read self-help books that hone in on organization, “how to utilize your time better.” The man introduced himself as Mark and told me that he is 24 and an accounting student at Baruch College. He said that since he’s “not really doing anything this summer”—that is to say, working a reduced three days a week—so he figured he wouldn’t “waste his time” and would, alternatively, “self-improve.”
    "Fix-It-Yourself" The College Hill Independent (9/16/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "On Wednesday, more than 1,000 people will gather in New York at the second annual Clinton Global Initiative, a project led by former President Clinton, to tackle problems involving global health, poverty, religious strife and threats to the environment.The long-term impact of the CGI is yet to be seen. But ensuring that promises made are promises kept increases its chance of success. "It's one thing to say, 'I have planted two million seedlings' and another to see how many trees are growing up and whether it's more than have been cut down," says S. Prakash Sethi, a professor of management at Baruch College in New York, who attended CGI last year but this year will be out of the country."
    "At Clinton Fest, Trust but Verify" The Wall Street Journal Online (9/16/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "When you're prepping for a big job interview, there's other required reading. You need to brush up on buzz-worthy books about big ideas, the experts say. Important books can come up in seemingly casual small talk - and in a situation like a job interview, every word you say is being weighed. Or, more often than not, you'll be asked flatout, "What have you been reading lately?" Don't get caught short. This question is supposed to be a softball, an easy chance for you to show you're smart. "It gives the job candidate an opportunity to share something about the richness of their intellectual life beyond the job," said John Elliott, dean of the Zicklin School of Business at Baruch College."
    "Well-read for work" New York Daily News (9/15/06)

  • Baruch College News
    "Universities, hurting for funds and overwhelmed with waves of new students, face budget crunches all around. In response, they’ve scrambled to afford basic necessities like housing, food and bookstores. And frequently they’ve outsourced these functions to private industry. Taking a different tack is Educational Housing Services, a nonprofit housing firm in New York. EHS serves schools including Baruch College, New York Law School and Pace University, and houses 2,800 students during the school year."
    "The New Business of College: Hamburger University" Forbes.com (9/14/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "Spitzer and Clinton were also expected to roll over their Republican
    opponents during the general election based on poll numbers that show New
    Yorkers - burdened by taxes, failing schools and rising housing costs - eager to usher in Democrats after almost a dozen years of Republican rule under Gov. George Pataki. "I think you might be looking at a Democratic sweep," said Doug Muzzio, a professor of public affairs at Baruch College. "The question is how big a slaughter it is."
    "ELECTION 2006; Blowouts in Dem races for governor, Senate" Newsday (9/13/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "Mark my words: Cuomo-versus-Pirro will make Cuomo-versus-Green sound like an Albany chorus of "Kum-ba-ya."  "These two have both the inclination and the material," said Doug Muzzio, the politically wired public-affairs professor at Baruch College and frank-spoken confidant to many New York pols. "There's motive and opportunity, like they say on the crime shows. They are aggressive. They are ambitious. There is money on both sides. She's a prosecutor. He's a tough guy. Come on!"
    "ELECTION 2006; Next, Cuomo vs. Pirro: Watch mud fly" Newsday (9/13/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "After his losing bids for the House of Representatives, the United States
    Senate, the mayoralty and now state attorney general, political consultants and analysts say that Mr. Green, the perennial candidate, had risked being thought of by voters as a perennial loser. ''There is an element of Green fatigue; he has been a candidate forever,'' said Doug Muzzio, a professor at the Baruch College School of Public Affairs. ' 'There are certain second and third acts in American politics, but when you're talking about Act 6 or 7, it's something different.''
    "After Another Loss, Green Says He'll Never Run Again" The New York Times
    (9/13/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "Doug Muzzio, a politics professor at Baruch College, said Clinton is likely to spend much of the fall trying to make inroads among conservatives and independents. "She wants to demonstrate that her appeal goes beyond the Democratic base for '08," he said. "Clearly she would love to exceed Schumer, but she mostly wants to be able to make the statement she can win over red state voters in blue states."
    "Clinton bulldozes over Tasini" Newsday (9/13/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "Baruch College political scientist Douglas Muzzio said Democrats, who have not held the governor's office since 1994, were long ago convinced they had a winner in Spitzer and never gave Suozzi much consideration.``The strategy of the Spitzer campaign ... was to be the unstoppable, juggernaut candidate and they did it,'' Muzzio said."
    "Spitzer rolls to primary win" UticaOD.com (9/13/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "In November, she (Sen. Hillary Clinton) will face Republican primary winner John Spencer, 59, a former Yonkers mayor, who trails Clinton in polls by more than 2 to 1. Spencer hasn't attracted the degree of national Republican support that allowed Clinton's 2000 opponent, Rick Lazio, to outspend her by $10.7 million...Douglas Muzzio, a professor of urban politics at Manhattan's Baruch College, said ``my gut tells me the Republicans are essentially punting when it comes to the Clinton-Spencer race.''
    "Clinton, Spitzer and Cuomo Coast to New York Primary Victories" Bloomberg.com (9/13/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "Professor Tony Tinker, Department of Accountancy, has been appointed to the American Accounting Association's Finance Committee, for a three year term, beginning in August 2006." (9/13/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "Emeritus Professor Abe Briloff was a “star” at the prestigious 2006 American Accounting Association, in Washington meeting this August. “Where is the Next Abe Briloff?” was the topic of the plenary address by Floyd Norris (Senior Staff Writer at the New York Times). Abe Briloff   -- who to the relief of many friends -- was in fine fettle, responded to Floyd’s challenge with characteristic passion and enthusiasm -- calling for a radical rethink in university research and teaching. Floyd Norris noted plans to make Abe Briloff “Immortal” in the “Virtual Abe Library”, where online visitors will be guided by a “Robotic Abe” (aged circa 40). Virtual Abe will respond to questions and direct visitors to electronic versions of his writings that are germane to analyzing current financial and audit failures. The Virtual Abe Library Project is supported by the Critical Perspectives on Accounting Journal, The Friends of Abe Briloff Society, Art Downing, Eric Neubacher, Rita Ormsby and other colleagues at Baruch’s Newman Library, and Professor George Mickhail, at the University of Wollongong, South Australia. Baruch now has two Abes on the job."  (9/13/06)

     

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "Conflict flaring throughout the Middle East is neither a clash of civilizations nor civil war, but instead a geo-civil war, according to John Brenkman, professor
    (Distinguished Professor of English in Baruch's Weissman School of Arts & Sciences) and international-affairs analyst
    . Brenkman argues that an appropriate label could lead to a better understanding of the conflicts and thus influence policy to bring about resolutions and stability. The conflicts have multiple sources and should not get lumped into a single target of global terrorism."
    "Call the Conflict by Its Proper Name: Geo-Civil War" YaleGlobal Online
    (9/12/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "New York State moved its primary to September from June in 1977, and some civic groups and elected leaders want to move it back. An earlier primary would avoid a campaign during the summer months, when many voters are not paying attention to politics, and it would allow for a longer general election race..."If you did it in June, Democrats wouldn't be beating each other up in June, July, August," a professor of public policy at Baruch College, Douglas Muzzio, said."
    "Proximity to Terror Attack Anniversary Has Some Seeking Change To Primary Date" The New York Sun (9/12/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "Douglas A. Muzzio, a professor of public affairs at Baruch College
    , said that today's results could be the first step toward a landmark political year for New York Democrats, but quickly added that huge victories for the primary nominees would not guarantee a sweep in November. ''A big question mark for this new Democratic ascendancy is the State Legislature, and whether Democrats can win so overwhelmingly that they take control of the State Senate,'' Mr. Muzzio said. The Democrats need to win five seats to take control. ''That would make the statewide offices totally blue.''
    "9/11 Pause, but Much Campaigning Behind the Scenes" The New York Times (9/12/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "Miringoff said the only Republican with a chance at this stage is Jeanine Pirro, 55, a former Westchester County district attorney running for attorney general. Her candidacy would be stronger had she not tried first to run for Senate, said Douglas Muzzio, a professor of urban politics at Manhattan's Baruch College. Pirro dropped that bid after early missteps."
    "Clinton, Spitzer Favored to Rout New York Primary Opponents" Bloomberg.com (9/12/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "Political analysts say if Mr. Cuomo wins today it will be difficult for him to employ the same front-runner strategy against the Republican candidate, Jeannine Pirro, in the general election. "I don't think Andrew can duck Jeannine the way he's been ducking the debates in the primary," a professor of public affairs at Baruch College, Douglas Muzzio, said."
    "Cuomo Shows Gain in Poll On Eve of Vote" The New York Sun (9/12/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "A new luxury apartment complex rising in Israel is using Mayor Bloomberg's name to promote its multimillion-shekel apartments.  A professor of public affairs at Baruch College, Douglas Muzzio, said the Bloomberg name has cachet due to the mayor's public service and the
    international press and broadcast company he founded. "Bloomberg's name is a known name," Mr. Muzzio said. "If there are stockbrokers in Jerusalem, they've all got a terminal with his name on it." "It would almost have to help," he added. "If you're going to pick an American name, Bloomberg is right up there."
    "Bloomberg Isn't Buying, but Israel Property Uses Him in Its Sales Promotion Effort" The New York Sun (9/12/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "Everyone knows Eliot Spitzer is going to trounce Tom Suozzi in tomorrow's Democratic primary for governor - so even Suozzi is having some fun while he can...So in the end, Suozzi is displaying a new trait: a sense of humor. "Not all attention is good attention, [but] I think it's a very positive way to react to desperation," said Doug Muzzio of the Baruch College School of Public Affairs. "Even though I respect [Republican] John Faso and Eliot Spitzer, they're not comedy material ... Maybe you have to be 60 points behind in New York State races to have a sense of humor." The irony in this, Muzzio said, is that Suozzi, the Nassau County executive, has a record of government reform and real ideas. He just picked the wrong year to run."
    "Last laugh for Suozzi" New York Daily News (9/11/06)

  • Baruch Student News
    "(CBS) Editor's Note: Rising from the dust and the smoke and the pain of the World Trade Center after 9/11 was a certain spirit in New York. It was a spirit of cooperation, a spirit of camaraderie, and a spirit of compassion. WCBSTV.com Web producer Gregg Geller chronicled this new spirit in a story he wrote in the days following the attacks...At the 69th Regiment Armory (the former site of the Victims Family Assistance Center), neighborhood residents, Baruch College students and those who work nearby walk quietly past hundreds of “missing” posters, lighting candles, laying flowers, delivering Teddy bears and praying together."
    "The Legacy of 9/11: The Best of N.Y. Emerges" WCBSTV.com (9/10/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "Four high-profile Democrats are running in the Sept. 12 primary to succeed
    veteran New York Democratic Rep. Major R. Owens in Brooklyn's 11th District -- and they have set up a race so tight that even local political insiders are
    loathe to predict a winner.   "You've got the interaction of geography and demography. You've got three black candidates, you've got overlapping districts . . . and you've got the various institutional supports. It's very difficult to figure out which way the vote's moving," political science professor Doug Muzzio of Baruch College, a part of the City University of New York, said in a recent interview."
    "Diverse Quartet of Contenders Creates a Lively Democratic Primary in
    Brooklyn" Congressional Quarterly (9/7/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "Males online are elusive? Hardly. They¹re busy watching TV - online.
    Another type of 18-to-24-friendly content ripe for advertising: anything
    involving fantasy sports. Why not put your name on some of the extra-step
    league and statistical tools? suggests Robb Hecht, a member of the
    adjunct faculty at New York City¹s Baruch College School of Continuing and Professional Studies
    ."
    OMMA- The Magazine of Online Media, Marketing and Advertising (Sept./Oct. 2006)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    SPA political science professor Doug Muzzio commented on the variables of the upcoming election in Brooklyn's 11th Congressional District. “You’ve got the interaction of geography and demography. You’ve got three black candidates, you’ve got overlapping districts ... and you’ve got the various institutional supports. It’s very difficult to figure out which way the vote’s moving,” political science professor Doug Muzzio of Baruch College, a part of the City University of New York, told CQPolitics.com. "
    "Four Dems Contending for Owens' Crown in the 'City of Kings' " CQPolitics.com (9/6/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "New York City has pledged $21 million to help those with lingering health effects from the 9/11 attacks...Doug Muzzio teaches public affaris at New York City's Baruch College. He says the move is significant, though not so much in dollar terms. "
    "Ground Zero health fund" Marketplace (9/6/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    Professor Ted Henken of Baruch's Department of Black and Hispanic Studies commented on Fidel Castro's recent proclamation that he's just fine, after having had gastrointestinal surgery in July. "Since 1956 or '57, he's been good at using the media to send messages,'' Baruch College Latin American studies professor Ted Henken said. "He has reiterated the message coming out this past month 'this is still serious. We're out of the woods, but don't expect me to walking around in my fatigues any time soon.' "
    "Castro says worst is over" The Australian (9/6/06); "Castro says worst is behind him" The Miami Herald (9/5/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "Rudolph Giuliani has repeatedly extended the hand of friendship to Christian conservatives in recent months. But a leading member of a think tank closely associated with the former Mayor has just delivered a powerful jab to the face of the same constituency..."Baruch College political-science professor Gerald De Maio, who teaches a course on religion and politics, believes that the debates about a Giuliani candidacy—and about the issues raised by Ms. Mac Donald’s article—are manifestations of the longstanding divide in the G.O.P. between social conservatives and libertarians. The libertarian wing, he said, “is muted. They count for much less than they used to. In many ways, Gerald Ford was the last President to represent that tendency. Now, one of the questions is: Could Rudy Giuliani get the nomination as a social liberal? I can’t see how social conservatives in the heartland can back him.”
    "A Giuliani Conservative Tilts at Religion" The New York Observer (9/6/06)

  • Baruch College News
    "CUNY's Baruch College has started a service that allows students to easily access class information such as homework assignments and campus computer lab availability over the phone. The service also lets students participate in surveys, start telephonic class discussions, arrange study groups or receive alerts from the college. Baruch tested its alerts this summer, informing freshmen scheduled for an orientation that the campus was closed because of an Aug. 3 power outage, meaning the students didn't have to commute to the college to find out the orientation had been canceled. The college's Air Baruch program, which began last week, takes advantage of the fact that more than 90 percent of students own or use mobile phones. It uses a language called Blackboard to let the students communicate, college officials said Tuesday. Baruch is one of the first U.S. colleges to employ mobile phones on campus, using technology called Rave, created by Rave Wireless Inc."
    "College program makes good use of cell phones" The Times-Union (Albany) (9/6/06); "City University of New York uses cell phones to educate" The Associated Press; "CUNY uses cell phones to educate" WNBC.com (9/5/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "Hospital executives may believe that group purchasing organizations are worth using, but one expert contends GPOs are driving up healthcare costs. Two recent studies come to opposing conclusions on the $96 billion GPO industry. A survey of GPO members conducted by Lawton Burns, a professor and director of the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton Center for Health Management and Economics, indicates hospitals are satisfied with their GPO contracts. ``Hospitals believe GPOs save money,'' Burns said. The other study, written by Prakash Sethi, president of Baruch College's International Center for Corporate Accountability, conducted an analysis of the GPO industry and came up with different conclusions. Sethi's study said GPOs charge suppliers an excessive amount in administrative fees. The charges drive up healthcare supply prices by $5 billion to $6 billion a year, the study said. Sethi also wrote that the code of conduct is ineffective because there is no way to hold GPOs accountable."
    "GPO surveys differ on costs" Modern Healthcare (9/4/06)

  • Baruch College News
    Air Baruch continues to generate coverage. "Baruch College students searching for an open computer on campus, assignments for a missed class, and even their best friends this fall semester now need only check their mobile phone for the info. The City University of New York's business school has launched a free service aimed at reaching students on the devices, which accompany them wherever they go. "These people live on their phones and they structure their lives on the spot," said Arthur Downing, chief information officer at Baruch. "We want to tap into that."
    "College phone plan an easy 'cell' " The New York Post (9/4/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    Doug Carmichael, an accountancy professor in Baruch's Stan Ross Department of Accountancy, penned a piece on eight new auditing standards. "The Auditing Standards Board recently issued eight new auditing standards, Nos. 104-111, collectively referred to as the risk assessment standards. The new standards will change many of the planning and risk assessment procedures performed during an audit (though most of the steps performed throughout the audit process remain largely the same). Implementation of the new standards should increase the effectiveness of financial statement audits, as auditors will now be required to:obtain a greater understanding of the entity and its environment, including its internal control; perform a more rigorous risk assessment; provide clear linkage between assessed risks of material misstatement and the audit procedures that address those risks; and, meet new and expanded documentation requirements. "
    "Commentary: Increase your audit 'vocabulary' with new risk standards" Accounting Today (9/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "Mayor Bloomberg thinks New Yorkers should be more frightened of lighting up than being blown up by terrorists. In the latest issue of Rolling Stone magazine, Hizzoner said Americans are "too freaked out" about terrorism - then suggested that smoking and crossing against the light are more worrisome than bomb-wielding extremists. Baruch College political-science Professor Doug Muzzio said the comments will
    likely make the mayor appear "tone deaf to what people are psychologically concerned about."
    "Mike Scolds: Don't 'Freak' Folks Too Scared By Terror, He Tells Mag" The New York Post (9/3/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "State Attorney General Eliot Spitzer has blown through $2.7 million dollars in the past few weeks in his quest to become governor - but he still has 12 times as much money as his Democratic primary rival, Tom Suozzi...The ads may be money well-spent, said Doug Muzzio of the Baruch College School of Public Affairs. "He wants to win with as huge a majority as is possible, and he's got the money to do it," Muzzio said."
    "No Let Up For Eliot As He Keeps Raking In - & Spending - Bundle" New York Daily News (9/2/06)

  • Baruch College News
    "Students at Baruch College (N.Y.) can learn a lot about what's happening on campus through their cell phones. Since the college set up Air Baruch though Rave Wireless, students can use their cell phones to reserve computers and study rooms, register for classes, view grades, and receive alerts and reminders about campus events."
    "Connect with busy students through their cell phones " Enrollment Management Report (9/1/06)

  • Baruch College News
    More news on unique features offered by Air Baruch. "One thing that it's really useful for is to meet new people, especially for the freshman that are coming in," student Yelena Zlatkina said. "They might not really know anybody here, so it's really useful to try and find people who are maybe in your classes or have the same interests, and get to know someone that you normally wouldn't get to know." An application that'll probably appeal most to parents, or at least help convince them to buy the service at the schools that charge for the service, is a safety application that could help protect the student in a potentially dangerous or scary situation. "Let's say you're going back home to Queens from Manhattan, you set a timer, and before you get back you turn it off," Desai said. "If you don't turn it off, you're warned, and after that if you still don't turn it off your location and your profile, in terms of your pictures, contact information and medical information, is sent to police so they can find you anywhere in the country." Some schools charge for the service. Baruch is among those that offers it for free."
    "Some colleges offer high-tech features" News 8 Austin (9/1/06)

  • Baruch College News
    "Federal agencies, state governments, and especially institutions of higher education are driving students who are from low-income families or are members of minority groups away from colleges and universities, according to a study released on Thursday that analyzed class mobility and racial matriculation rates in academe...In fact, while the report was scathing at some points, it did identify some institutions that showed little or no gap between the graduation rates of student subpopulations. One such institution was the City University of New York's Bernard M. Baruch College, whose provost and vice president for academic affairs, David Dannenbring, also spoke at the news conference on Thursday. Mr. Dannenbring jokingly said Baruch College is one of the few institutions in the "50/50 club": over half its students are poor enough to receive Pell grants, but over half graduate within six years. He said that Baruch has made concerted efforts not only to reach but retain low-income and minority students by expanding summer offerings to keep them attending year-round, and by offering Saturday and Sunday classes. All the extra classes, he said, "sold out very quickly."
    "Report Blames College Practices for Limiting Access of Minority and Low-Income Students" Chronicle of Higher Education (9/1/06)

  • Baruch College News
    "Long lines are an unfortunate fact of life at the Baruch College library as students jockey for everything from Internet time to a quiet place to catch up on studies. But this year, students with cell phones can avoid the wait.
    “Without having to come across campus to a particular service desk, they can tell whether there are any group study rooms available, whether there are seats available in our computer labs, or whether there are any laptops for them to borrow,” says Arthur Downing of Baruch College. That's because Baruch College has joined more than a dozen other universities and colleges around the nation in implementing Rave Wireless. Called “Air Baruch” here, the new technology essentially turns any phone on any service into a Swiss Army-type device with a whole host of new campus-based features."
    "Wireless Service Could Make Campus Life Easier For College Students" NY1 News (8/30/06); "Wireless service makes life easier for college students" News 14 Carolina (9/12/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "Attorney-client privilege has long been recognized and respected by the legal system, since the confidentiality it provides instills confidence among
    attorneys and clients to discuss sensitive matters, including compliance with
    laws and regulations, remediation of noncompliance and defense of those accused of breaking the law. Doug Carmichael, an accounting professor at Baruch College and former chief auditor of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (PCAOB), doesn't believe AU 9326 breaks the treaty, and argues that being a public company comes with special obligations. He views AU 9326 as "transcend[ing] any notion of attorney-client privilege being something a company can insert to prevent adequate disclosure to a user of financial statements."
    "Has 'privilege' lost its reward?" Financial Executive (9/1/06)


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Baruch in the Media - Archive - August 2006


  • Baruch College News
    "Long lines are an unfortunate fact of life at the Baruch College library as students jockey for everything from Internet time to a quiet place to catch up on studies. But this year, students with cell phones can avoid the wait.
    “Without having to come across campus to a particular service desk, they can tell whether there are any group study rooms available, whether there are seats available in our computer labs, or whether there are any laptops for them to borrow,” says Arthur Downing of Baruch College. That's because Baruch College has joined more than a dozen other universities and colleges around the nation in implementing Rave Wireless. Called “Air Baruch” here, the new technology essentially turns any phone on any service into a Swiss Army-type device with a whole host of new campus-based features."
    "Wireless Service Could Make Campus Life Easier For College Students" NY1 News (8/30/06)

  • Baruch College News
    "Baruch College students will be able to access class schedule changes and other campus information via their cell phones starting this fall.
    Baruch's partner, Manhattan startup Rave Wireless, has inked deals with four other metro area colleges to provide secure social networks. Baruch will be the first to debut the service, which Rave says is compatible with all four major cell phone carriers."
    "Baruch inks networking deal with Rave Wireless" Crain's New York Business (8/30/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    Zicklin School finance professor Robert Schwartz commented in an article on NYSE chairman Richard Grasso's recent performance and looming trial to defend his controversial $190 million pay package."Grasso's job first and foremost was to represent the members of the exchange,'' said Robert Schwartz, a finance professor at the Baruch College Zicklin School of Business in New York.  "He did that beautifully.''
    "Grasso's tenure under scrutiny as pay trial looms; Prosecutions of ex-NYSE traders illustrate self-dealing" Investment News (8/28/06)

  • Baruch College News
    Baruch's grant from the Starr Foundation to develop the Starr Career Development Center at Baruch College is the subject of a national radio segment airing on NPR's Marketplace Morning Report. Ben Corpus, Vice President for Student Affairs, speaks about why Baruch thinks this is worthwhile, how Baruch students are unique, and how this could become a national model.
    "Professional Polish " Marketplace Morning Report, NPR (8/28/06)

  • Baruch College News
    Inside Higher Ed ran a piece detailing Baruch's recent doantion from the Starr Foundation, in the form of a grant of $2 million — with possible additional matching funds of up to $3 million, to develop and maintain existing programs aimed at educating students on the social skills that will help them land power jobs. "Employers and prospective employers told Baruch that its students were “just as smart as those anywhere, harder working, less arrogant, and more inclined to jump in and get things done.” Of course there is more to the business world, however un-meritocratic that reality is, and that’s where the problem sets in for the college. “What we’ve concluded is that — fairly or not — recruiters are looking for a certain presentation,” Haggarty said. “If they sense that a student lacks that presentation — whatever it is — speech, dress, or whatever it is, it can be a very intangible thing. We want to make sure our students are not disregarded on the basis that isn’t reflected in their application.”
    "Help for the Non-Country Club Set"Inside Higher Education (8/22/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    Earlier this week, Republican US Senate candidate KT McFarland put her campaign on hold after her 16-year-old daughter was arrested for shoplifting. SPA Dean David Birdsell weighed in the toll such a move will take on her already troubled campaign. "But David Birdsell of Baruch College isn't so sure she'll be celebrating.“It's not just a matter or restarting, it's restarting in the face of another cycle of negative news that reinforces many of the questions that many people have had about KT McFarland,” Birdsell said."
    "McFarland campaign rolls on despite family problems" Capital 9 News (8/22/06); "KT McFarland Says She's Staying In Republican Senate Race" NY1 News (8/23/06)


  • Baruch College News
    "Baruch College plans to sink millions of dollars into polishing its scrappy Big Apple business students beginning this fall, with a program emphasizing the "soft skills" inherent among blue-blood Ivy Leaguers. Believing that the curriculum at the esteemed City University of New York business school is second to none, college officials said the new program focuses on refining students in the social graces inborn to country-club kids attending pricey universities...The professional-development initiative, created with a $2 million grant from The Starr Foundation, is thought to be the first of its kind in higher education in the country. The foundation has also committed to matching up to $3 million in Baruch fund-raising to develop the program over the next three years into a national model - bringing Baruch's potential investment to $8 million."
    "CUNY's Classy Tact-Ic" The New York Post (8/21/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "The big push is to replace Republicans with Democrats, that's a much higher priority than replacing a Democrat with another Democrat," said Tom Halper, chair of the political science department at Baruch College. Halper said (Edolphus) Towns is a stark example of how difficult it is to unseat an incumbent, particularly when the Brooklyn Democratic organization is disorganized and weak. "Towns is one of these congressmen who's been there forever and has never done anything and is invisible," said Halper. "He really has accumulated some significant enemies over the years, but at the same time he's really been ineffectual."
    "Union opposition goes, political winds shift to Brooklyn lawmaker" The Associated Press, Staten Island Advance (8/20/06); "Political Winds in Brooklyn Have Shifted to Towns" The New York Sun (8/21/06)

  • Baruch College News
    SPA professor Stan Altman penned a piece for The New York Times' Op-Ed page that focuses on the health of 9/11 first-responders and their need for treatment of serious health problems that developed after 9/11. " Today, increasing numbers of emergency service workers are reporting breathing and digestive problems and rashes, and their incidence of cancer is higher than normal. At least one death, that of Detective James Zadroga in January, from heart and lung complications, has been linked by a medical examiner to work at Ground Zero; six other responders in their 30's and 40's have died from causes like heart failure and lung cancer."
    "Poisoned Heroes" The New York Times (8/17/06)

  • Baruch College News
    Baruch's Freshman Year website was mentioned in the July/August 2006 issue of About Campus as a model of best practices in reaching out to parents at a commuter campus. "The powerful influences of family and the increased prominence of family in traditional-age students' lives suggests that parents and other family members should be incorporated into the urban college experience in as many formal ways as possible. The Web site for the Freshman Year Program at City University of New York's Baruch College includes a Web page addressed to parents, with links guiding them through their son or daughter's transition to college in the first year and beyond."
    "Succeeding in the City: Challenges and Best Practices on Urban Commuter Campuses" About Campus (July/August 2006)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    Associate professor of  law and real estate Jay Weiser reviewed two books on religion for The Weekly Standard. "These two witty books by Cambridge and Oxford academics--Patrick Collinson's 238-page miracle of compression and Diarmaid MacCulloch's all-seeing 792-page survey--address the intersection between theology, social change, and political and military conflict, and reflect a generation of work by armies of scholars on this sprawling 200-year period."
    "What Luther Wrought; Protestant Europe and the invention of the modern world" The Weekly Standard (8/21-28/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    Public affairs professor Doug Muzzio commented on Eliot Spitzer's campaign commercials for the New York governor's race. "It's brilliant," said Baruch College political scientist Doug Muzzio. "You're reading it deadpan, and I got goose bumps. The soaring rhetoric? C'mon. We need it."
    "The sappy, savvy selling of Spitzer" New York Daily News (8/15/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "Newspeak has been formed as a “young” design boutique in New York City, specializing in motion design, art direction and identity development. The company has been founded by Erik Montovano, who serves as Creative Director. He is joined at Newspeak by Andreea Prichea as Executive Producer. The company’s initial projects are a major show package for mtvU—MTV’s 24-hour college network, and show packages for three Vh1Classic  series... Holding a MA in philosophy, Andreea’s interest spurs into the aesthetics of design and especially motion design. Andreea also teaches Philosophy at Baruch College."
    "Newspeak Formed; First Projects are for MTVU and VH1" Broadcast Newsroom (8/14/06); "Newspeak Opens in NYC with MTVU& VH1 Projects" VFXWorld (8/21/06)

  • Baruch College News
    An editorial in the Daily News presented the other side of the coin in response to The New York Times' recent article on enrollment patterns at several CUNY schools. "There is evidence, in fact, that City, Hunter and Baruch are losing black students because black students are choosing to go elsewhere, not because they are being turned away. For example, black enrollment has risen 13% at Brooklyn College and 9% at Queens College. Students admitted to both those schools have roughly the same average SAT scores as the kids at Hunter and Baruch, and their scores are significantly higher than those at CCNY. And incoming Brooklyn College students have the highest average grade-point average, 3.2, of all five schools. What's more, across the system, black students are completing their degrees in bigger numbers than they did five years ago. And that's what matters most."
    "Numbers game" New York Daily News (8/14/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    Public affairs professor Doug Muzzio commented on the upcoming debate between two of the Democratic rivals in New York's state attorney general race, Andrew Cuomo and Mark Green. "Green's résumé almost fits the job perfectly...the downside is there is an element of Green fatigue," said Doug Muzzio, a political science professor at Baruch College. "You have two very smart, aggressive guys, so you'll have a lively, barb-filled confrontation."
    "POLS' FIGHT OF LIVING DEAD Cuomo, Green bid for revival in AG contest" New York Daily News (8/13/06)

  • Baruch College News
    An editorial in The New York Sun responded to The New York Times' recent article on enrollment patterns at several CUNY schools."Whatever else one wants to read into the statistics, there's no evidence that the university is in some way biased against minorities in its admissions policies. The real question raised by the numbers is why minority students appear to be having so much trouble competing under the admissions standards introduced in 1999. The answer is to be found not in a CUNY admissions office but in the elementary and high schools. The numbers are startling. Blacks last year made up 30% of the undergraduate student body at City College, down from about 40% in 1999, before more rigorous admissions standards were re-introduced. Hunter has seen its black enrollment decline to 15% from 20% over the same span, while the drop at Baruch has been to 14% from 24%. The numbers seem all the more puzzling because they come as overall black enrollment across the CUNY system has increased by about 1.3% during that period."
    "What CUNY's Numbers Mean" The New York Sun (8/11/06)

  • Baruch College News
    CUNY Chancellor Matthew Goldstein reponded to a recent New York Times article about enrollment patterns of African-American students at several CUNY schools. "In an interview with The New York Sun, Mr. Goldstein said the university's admissions policies are designed to be race-blind and aren't impervious to fluctuations in minority enrollment.The policies have "nothing to do about whether the student is black, white, yellow. Those are variables that are not at all considered," he said. "The important thing is that the university is a welcoming environment with lots of different entry points."Between 2001 and 2005 — the four years following CUNY's adoption of tougher admissions standards — the enrollment of black students at City College fell by 7.5%, at Hunter College by 25%, and at Baruch College by 28.1%. Since 2001, CUNY has seen an overall 1.3% increase in black enrollment at its senior colleges, with a 13.3% increase at Brooklyn College and a 9.3% increase at Queens College."
    "CUNY Defends Race-Blind Admissions Policies" The New York Sun (8/11/06)

  • Baruch College News
    A CUNY officer presented another view of the enrollment patterns of African-American students at CUNY schools. "Dr. Selma Botman, CUNY's chief academic officer, said freshman enrollment among blacks was up 11 percent across the senior colleges and suggested the overall decline at Hunter, Baruch and City was a reflection of a shift in career interests among young blacks."
    "Black Setback At Key CUNY Schools" The New York Post (8/10/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    Public affairs professor Doug Muzzio commented on possible motives for Mayor Bloomberg's endorsement of Sen. Lieberman's decision to run as an independent after losing the Democratic primary to Ned Lamont. "If he is thinking a couple of steps ahead it fits perfectly strategically," a professor of public policy at Baruch College, Douglas Muzzio, said. "Mike Bloomberg's thinking ahead could take three nonexclusive forms. One is he is laying out a national agenda. Two, he is laying out a national agenda with the eye toward creating a third party or this other movement. And three, he is thinking of laying the groundwork for this organization with him as its presidential candidate in 2008."
    "Bloomberg Backs Lieberman in Sign That 2008 Is in Play" The New York Sun
    (8/10/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    Assistant professor of accountancy Steven Melnik commented on the higher tax rate applied to profits gained from trading gold bullion."If we are talking about collectibles, that's a maximum 28% tax rate," says Steven Melnik, director of graduate tax programs at City University of New York's Baruch College. "An unsophisticated investor could easily get lost in the shuffle, as they often do." He notes that short-term gains, which are generated from assets held less than a year, are taxed as ordinary income."
    "Gold's tax twist" TheStreet.com (8/10/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    Public affairs professor Doug Muzzio commented on Sen. Lieberman's refusal to withdraw despite being defeated by Ned Lamont in the primary race. "Political analyst Doug Muzzio said the speech epitomized a campaign characterized by "hubris, staying above it all, and strategic blindness" mainly to the crucial importance of the Iraq war, which Lieberman supported from the outset, and the extent to which voters identified him with President Bush's policies. "He was in denial," said Muzzio, professor of public affairs at Baruch College. "You saw the arrogance of the incumbent, the self-esteem he felt towards himself."
    "Lieberman defiant in primary defeat: is it in a politician's DNA?" The Associated Press; Seattle Post-Intelligencer (8/10/06)

  • Baruch College News
    Baruch was mentioned in a New York Times article examining enrollment patterns of African-American students at several CUNY schools. "Officials at Baruch said they were trying to improve their recruiting. They also said that while the number of black students had fallen, they were doing better academically. Baruch now has 51 percent of its black students graduating within six years, up from 28 percent a decade ago. James F. Murphy, assistant vice president for enrollment management, said Baruch had admitted about 2 percent more black students this year than in 2005, and was waiting to see how many enrolled. “We have our fingers crossed that we will see an improvement,” he said."
    "CUNY Seeing Fewer Blacks at Top Schools" The New York Times (8/10/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    Public affairs professor Doug Muzzio commented on the fundraising letter sent out recently by Rep. Thomas Reynolds, chairman of the National Republican Congressional Committee, which took a swipe at Democratic Rep. Charles Rangel. "Doug Muzzio, a politics professor at Baruch College, said the fundraiser salvo is classic election year fare, when "you're trying to knock off the senior guy on the other side."
    "NYer vs NYer in GOP fundraiser" The Associated Press; New York Newsday (8/9/06)

  • Baruch College News
    "James L. Tyson, 90, a market researcher who became a strident critic of American journalism during the Cold War, died of kidney failure July 10 at his home in Darien, Conn. ... Mr. Tyson graduated cum laude from Harvard University in 1939. He interviewed financier Bernard Baruch for his senior thesis, which was published in Fortune magazine in 1940."
    "James Tyson; Critic of Cold War Media" The Washington Post (8/9/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    Weissman School assistant professor of political science Dov Waxman's commentary on solutions that may ease the conflict between Israel and Hezbollah was posted at Zaman Online.
    "Time to Talk to Syria" Zaman Online (8/8/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    Public affairs professor Doug Muzzio commented on Senator Clinton's call for Defense Secretary Rumsfeld's resignation last week, in the wake of Senator Lieberman's slipping poll numbers. "Clearly, the extent of the reaction and the effectiveness of the reaction to Lieberman has a lot of pro-war-vote Democrats real nervous," said Doug Muzzio, a political science professor at Baruch College in Manhattan. "And she is the most prominent of those folks."
    "Clinton facing anti-war backlash" The Journal News (8/5/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    Business journalism professor Eugene Marlow was quoted in an article detailing the imminent destruction of an American-owned jazz club in Beijing. "The Big Easy has been an icon of American jazz music and culture in the city. It is terrible that they are tearing it down," said Eugene Marlow, a professor at the Baruch College of the City University of New York, who is writing a book on jazz in China."
    "Symbol of Americna jazz culture faces demolition" China View (8/5/06)

           
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Baruch in the Media - Archive - July 2006

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    History professor Ervand Abrahamian commented on the current Israeli conflict with Hezbollah. "Really, the two governments are not concerned with how the world sees them. They feel that they are right and they have the might, and they are going to use the might to what they say [will] create a so-called new Middle East," said Ervand Abrahamian, a professor at Baruch College."
    "Israeli Vice Premier Tells New York Audience Hezbollah Must Be Defeated" NY1 News (7/31/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    Distinguished professor of management S. Prakash Sethi commented on group purchasing organizations (GPOs) in an article examining the £4 billion a year contract Texas-based Novation and its German partner, DHL, was recently awarded by Britain's National Health Service (NHS). "Professor Prakash Sethi, president of the International Centre for Corporate Accountability at Baruch College in New York, said: “My most conservative estimates suggest that GPOs extract extra profits of $5 billion (£2.6 billion) to $6 billion which legitimately belong to their principal clients, the hospitals.”
    "Firm handed £4bn NHS contract was investigated for overcharging" Times Online UK (7/31/06)

  • Baruch College News
    The inaugural edition of the Baruch Business Report is a conversation between John Elliott, the Dean of Baruch’s Zicklin School of Business, and Terrence Martell, professor of Finance and International Business at Zicklin. The report will be available as a monthly podcast. The discussion starts with the results of this quarter’s “Chief Financial Officers Outlook Survey,” which is conducted quarterly by Financial Executives International and the Zicklin School of Business, and continues into a larger economic analysis.
    "From Enron to the Fed: The CFO Outlook Survey"  (7/27/06)
           
  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    The 10-day blackout in northwest Queens prompted Mayor Bloomberg to implement measures aimed at expediting reimbursement to businesses and residents affected by the outage. "Political analysts applauded the mayor's move, including his decision to postpone his trip to Ireland. "It's a recognition of both the needs of the community and, in a sense, Mike Bloomberg's political needs," a professor of public policy at Baruch College, Douglas Muzzio, said. "It's both politics and good policy."
    "After Outcry Over Outage in Queens, Mayor Takes Steps to Help Businesses" The New York Sun (7/27/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    Mayor Bloomberg cancelled a trip to Ireland in the wake of criticism on his handling of the 10-day power outages in parts of Queens. Public affairs professor Doug Muzzio commented in the Daily News' latest report. "When you look back over Mike Bloomberg's two terms this is going to be certainly one of the negatives, one of the low grades on the report card - it's symptomatic of his tone deafness," said Doug Muzzio, a professor of public affairs at Baruch College. "The fact that he called real suffering of large numbers of people an 'inconvenience,' there's really an element of out-of-touchness about that."
    "Mayor pulls plug on trip to Ireland" New York Daily News (7/27/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    Distinguished professor of management S. Prakash Sethi commented on group purchasing organizations (GPOs) in an article examining the £4 billion a year contract Texas-based Novation and its German partner, DHL, was recently awarded by Britain's National Health Service (NHS). "Novation and other American group purchasing organisations (GPOs) were the subject of a US Senate hearing this year at which criticisms were made of their influence on the market. One witness, Prakash Sethi, of the Zicklin School of Business in New York , claimed that such organisations took part in questionable contractual arrangements, which enriched them "at the expense of healthcare providers, new entrants and the public at large."
    "American firm is hired to do all NHS shopping" Times Online UK (7/26/06)

  • Baruch College News
    Rave Wireless, service provider for Air Baruch, the college's mobile campus network, was the subject of a recent article examining the technology behind the product. "In addition to Allen University, other campuses deploying Rave's technology include Baruch College of the City University of New York, California State University Monterey Bay, Eastern Michigan University, Georgetown University, Monmouth University, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and University of South Florida."
    "Colleges Rave for Wireless" Wireless Week (7/26/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    Public affairs professor Doug Muzzio weighed in on the recent debate between the Democratic candidates running for New York governor, Tom Suozzi and Eliot Spitzer. "Baruch College political science professor Douglas Muzzio said it was more of a draw, agreeing that Suozzi landed a few blows. But, Muzzio noted, Spitzer acquitted himself well enough to deflect any lasting damage. Primary day is just seven weeks away."
    "Spitzer,Suozzi spar in spirited debate" Albany Times-Union (7/26/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    Public affairs professor Doug Muzzio commented on a recent debate between the two Democratic candidates in the New York governor's race, Tom Suozzi and Eliot Spitzer. "They went toe-to-toe but they were civil," said Baruch College Prof. Doug Muzzio. "I thought they both were articulate, and they both showed that they could be governor."
    "Suozzi fails to land KO" New York Daily News (7/26/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    Public affairs professor Doug Muzzio was quoted in an article about the hard feelings some Queens residents harbor for Mayor Bloomberg after the recent blackouts. "It's almost like one CEO backslapping another CEO," said Douglas Muzzio, a Baruch College public policy professor from Woodside. "Does it signal that a Manhattan Republican liberal from the East Side in some way didn't understand the plight of us working-class folks in Queens? Yes."
    "Will Queens outage devastate Bloomberg's legacy?" New York Newsday (7/26/06)

  • Baruch College News
    "The fall class at the City University of New York is shaping up to be the smartest in a generation, new statistics obtained by The Post show.
    There were 4,341 high-school graduates with grade point averages of 90 and above who applied and were accepted at CUNY campuses for the coming fall - an 11.8 percent increase over last year. The number of "A" students considering CUNY colleges is a whopping 59.7 percent higher than in 2000, when the university tightened its admission policy by phasing out open enrollment and eliminating remedial courses at its four-year institutions...But CUNY officials say more high-school grads are looking to CUNY as a first choice, not a last resort. The $4,000 annual tuition is still a fraction of private colleges. Overall, freshmen admissions are up 5.2 percent at all community and four-year colleges, which should trigger an increase in enrollment. At the five flagship colleges (Baruch, Brooklyn, City, Hunter and Queens), freshmen applications are up 7 percent."
    "CUNY's Brainstorm" The New York Post (7/24/06)

  • Baruch Alumni News
    "Former Staten Islander Michelle L. Goldstein has been appointed director of the Office of State Legislative Affairs, Mayor Michael Bloomberg announced yesterday.In her new position, Ms. Goldstein will be responsible for advocating on behalf of the city and the mayor, and reviewing all state legislation."I am thrilled to work with Mayor Bloomberg and the entire Intergovernmental Affairs team in advancing the City's agenda in Albany," Ms. Goldstein said.Prior to her appointment, Ms. Goldstein served as Director of Government Affairs for the Metropolitan Transportation Authority.A graduate of Susan E. Wagner High School, she earned a bachelor of arts degree from the University of Michigan, and a Masters of Public Administration from the Baruch College School of Public Affairs."
    "Former Islander to represent city in Albany" Staten Island Advance (7/24/06)

  • Baruch College News
    "Standard & Poor's puts capital spending growth at around 10 percent to 11 percent in 2006 for companies in the S&P 500 index, adding to the 12.7 percent gain last year that pushed expenditures above $342 billion. Those findings were echoed in a recent survey of 207 chief financial officers. Nearly three-quarters of them said they expect to increase capital spending over the next year, with the average increase being about 8 percent, according to a survey done by the CFO trade group Financial Executives International and Baruch College's Zicklin School of Business."
    "Business spending may help economy" Seattle Post-Intelligencer (7/24/06); "U.S. economy needs business buying burst" Associated Press (7/20/06), Forbes.com (7/21/06); "Big business to the rescue?" Pueblo Chieftan (7/22/06); "CFOs see higher tags ahead" Purchasing (7/13/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    Public affairs professor Doug Muzzio was quoted in the New York Times' obituary for Thomas J. Manton, the influential Queens Democrat, who died on Saturday. "While the patronage system and political machines have been weakening in the city for decades, “the Queens organization has maintained a singular ability to nominate and elect candidates and, to some extent, control their votes,” said Douglas A. Muzzio, a professor of public affairs at Baruch College in Manhattan, who described Mr. Manton as “in many ways, the last of the big-time county bosses in this city.”
    "Thomas J. Manotn, 73, influential Queens Democrat, Dies" The New York Times (7/24/06)

  • Baruch College News
    "As governments, including New York City’s, find new ways to assess their performance, (for more, see Gotham Gazette’s section Measuring Up), some experts say that all too often officials ignore a key piece -- what the people who are supposed to benefit from government services think of those services. In response, academics, officials and others are striving to come up with ways to take the pulse of the people -- and use that data to improve government performance. The issue has attracted enough interest lately that last month, dozens of policy experts, academics and Bloomberg administration officials turned out early on a Monday morning for a forum at Baruch College on “giving New Yorkers a voice.”
    "Taking the Public Pulse"Gotham Gazette (7/24/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    Public affairs professor Doug Muzzio was also quoted in the above mentioned article.“Do people call 311 to pay the city compliments? Probably not, said Douglas Muzzio, a public policy professor at Baruch College."
    "Taking the Public Pulse"Gotham Gazette (7/24/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    Zicklin's Wollman distinguished professor of economics June O'Neill testified before the House Ways and Means Committee on the results of the 1996 welfare reform act. "The committee convened the hearing nearly ten years after President Clinton signed the measure into law to hear testimony on the successes and failures of the law that substantially overhauled and revised the nation's welfare system. In addition to Riley, the committee heard from former Speaker of the House of Representatives Newt Gingrich, former Secretary of Health and Human Services Tommy Thompson as well as policy analysts and economists from the Brookings Institute, the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, the Heritage Foundation and Baruch College."
    "1996 Welfare Overhaul" Congressional Quarterly (7/19/06); "Welfare ended, poverty remains, Griswold, mainline leaders tell Congress" Worldwide Faith News (7/20/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    SPA professor Doug Muzzio commented on Sen. Clinton's recent fundraising in an article examining her celebrity donors."The celebrity and the sports and the pop culture figures are interesting, but it's the small donors that she's building into a committed base," said Baruch College's Doug Muzzio. "It's smart. They're building the infrastucture for a presidential campaign."
    "Celebs money in the bank for Hil" New York Daily News (7/20/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "Simply asking survey participants if they intend to exercise or use illegal drugs in the near future can result in increases in both behaviors, according to researchers at Duke University, the University of Pennsylvania and Baruch College. In a study published in the June issue of the journal Social Influence, marketing professors Fitzsimons, Patti Williams of the Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania, and Lauren Block of Baruch’s Zicklin School of Business asked 167 undergraduate students how likely they were to either exercise or use illegal drugs during the next two months."
    "Simply Asking Questions Can Increase Risky Behaviors, New Study Shows" Duke University News (7/19/06); "Survey questioning can alter subjects' behavior, study says" San Jose Mercury News (7/20/06); "Study: Surveys' questions seem to influence behavior" Lexington Herald-Leader (KY) (7/21/06); "Questions can spur behavior, study says" Houston Star-Telegram (7/21/06); "After survey on illegal drugs, respondents increase use" The Philadelphia Inquirer, "Asking questions may up risky behavior" United Press International (7/24/06); "Talk about drugs may lead to addiction" ABC News (7/26/06)


  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    The diverging opinions of SPA's Dean Birdsell and public affairs professor Doug Muzzio were quoted in a article examining whether the realtionship between Speaker Quinn and Mayor Bloomberg will suffer due to their own diverging opinions on term limits. "This will be the first sort of public spat between the mayor and the new speaker," a political science professor at Baruch College, Doug Muzzio, said. Another Baruch political science professor, David Birdsell, said he saw yesterday's disagreement as part of an ongoing difference between the two officials. "I wouldn't see this as a major rupture between the mayor and the speaker. This is just a continuation of positions and needs that both have articulated in the past," he said."
    "Quinn, Bloomberg's Divergent Views on Term Limits Signal Change in
    Relationship" The New York Sun (7/19/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    The size of candidates' war chests in New York's attorney general race, and specifically, how much bigger Andrew Cuomo's is than Mark Green's, were the subject of SPA professor Doug Muzzio's latest comment to local political media. "It's Andrew's race to lose now," said Baruch College political science Prof. Doug Muzzio. "He has been leading in the polls, he is leading in the money and he is leading in the organizational base."
    "Green losing the battle of the bucks to AG foe Cuomo" New York Daily News (7/18/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    Weissman School CUNY Distinguished Professor of History, Ervand Abrahamian, was quoted in the Financial Times' recent examination of the current Mideast situation."Ervand Abrahamian, history professor at the City University of New York, doubts Iran has sufficient influence over Hizbollah to calm the situation. “Hizbollah’s leaders are not the types to take orders from elsewhere,” he says. Mr Abrahamian believes the Bush administration’s main objective remains “regime change”, and does not rule out US air strikes."
    "Experts challenge White House on Iran influence"   FT.com (7/17/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    Weissman School assistant professor of political science Dov Waxman was quoted in NY1's the online report about the crisis in the Mideast. "The estimates are in the hundreds of millions - the cost to the Lebanese infrastructure as result of Israel’s bombing," said Dov Waxman of Baruch College.
    "Demonstrators rally at UN as Mideast firestorm rages" NY1 News (7/17/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    History professor Jed Abrahamian, a noted author and expert on Iran and the Mideast, was re-quoted in a piece on the "Beware of pretexts for war" section of Workers World. "The political wing of the NCRI has reportedly funneled information about Iran to the Bush administration. Baruch College history professor Ervand Abrahamian describes the NCRI as having as little credibility as Pentagon puppet Ahmad Chalabi “and the Iraqi enthusiasts for liberation and invasion.” (Richard Kim, The Nation, Aug. 7, 2005)"
    "AntIran protest misdirects LGBT struggle" Workers World (7/17/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    SPA professor Doug Muzzio was quoted in an article on City Council Speaker Christine Quinn's recent tactics. "She was an outsider, and now she's an insider," said Doug Muzzio, a professor of public affairs at Baruch College. "Insiders play different games than outsiders, have different strategies, different tactics."
    "Kiss the old Quinn goodbye!" New York Daily News (7/15/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    SPA professor Doug Muzzio weighed in on Kathleen Troia "KT" McFarland's chances at winning the GOP's nomination for the upcoming Senate race. "There is nothing she can do," said Doug Muzzio, a political science professor at Baruch College in Manhattan. "She has no message, she has no money and she has no organization. The only thing that is interesting about KT McFarland is the psychodrama. You can't walk away from the wackiness."
    "McFarland short on message, money" The Journal News (7/15/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    SPA professor Doug Muzzio commented on Sen. Clinton's untiring fundraising efforts of late. "She can use any money she doesn't spend on a future contest, and political observers say there's only one reason to raise that much money for a senator facing only lightweight opposition in November. "She's fund-raising a presidential campaign, bottom line," said Baruch College politics professor Doug Muzzio."
    "War Chest Champ. Hil's $45M Sets a Senate-Race Record" New York Daily News (7/15/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "The study, "How Much More Cost Sharing Will Health Savings Accounts Bring?" — penned by Dahlia Remler, a professor at Baruch College's School of Public Affairs, and Sherry Glied, a professor at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health — says that typical health plans in the market today already incorporate substantial cost sharing, and companies conduct periodic reviews of their traditional plans to control consumer spending. So the reduction in medical spending that most company executives expect from implementing HSA/HDHP will not likely materialize."
    "HSAs May Not Deliver Company Savings" CFO.com (7/14/06); "Health savings accounts not likely cost cures" Marketwatch.com (7/17/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    Two of Zicklin's most famous names in accounting were mentioned in an article examining the the need for greater regulation of auditing firms in light of a recent federal appeals court ruling that the S.E.C. cannot force hedge funds to register and submit to federal inspections of their books. "It was 13 years ago that Stanley Sporkin, then a federal judge and previously a director of enforcement for the Securities and Exchange Commission, warned that the pricing of derivatives ''is going to blow up in somebody's face one of these days.'' It is at least conceivable that his warning played a role in the new
    ruling. Mr. Sporkin was speaking at Baruch College in New York, delivering the Emanuel Saxe Distinguished Lecture in Accounting, named for a former Baruch dean. In the speech, he paid tribute to Abraham Briloff, a Baruch professor and critic of accounting firms, who calls the late dean ''my beloved mentor.''Saxe was more than a mentor to the judge who wrote the appeals court decision. That judge, David A. Saxe, is his son."
    "Should Faulty Old Audits Be Forgotten?" The New York Times; "Should bad old audits be forgot?" The International Herald Tribune (7/14/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    SPA professor Doug Muzzio was quoted in a piece that pondered whether Mayor Bloomberg's plans for 2008 included a presidential bid. "Baruch College political-science expert Doug Muzzio called it part of "the political silly season . . . there's nothing [else] going on." "I think the presidential talk has really been among the chattering classes, and hasn't filtered down to the electorate," he said."
    "NYers Don't Like Mike for Prez" The New York Post (7/13/06)

  • Baruch College News
    Air Baruch, the College's mobile network for students, was mentioned in an article examining how increasing numbers of colleges use mobile technology to help students stay connected to campus life. "Baruch College of the City University of New York is an institution whose students spread out all over New York City when they aren’t in class, for jobs and to care for their families. “A lot of our students are doing so much with Baruch and full-time jobs that everything they do is rushed, and they don’t have a lot of money, so our plan is to help them interact with the campus and build a sense of community, and not charge them anything,” says Arthur Downing, the CIO."
    "Campus Cells" Inside Higher Ed (7/13/06)

  • Baruch College News
    Respondents in a poll designed by Baruch for Citizens for NYC selected street noise and litter most often out of a choice of 33 urban annoyances. "The "seasonal" nature of the replies to the survey mean that the answers could change throughout the year, Stephen Immerwahr, a spokesman for Baruch College, which designed the poll, said. "In summer, for example, more people have their windows open, so would inevitably complain about more noise." Compared with last year's survey, 47% said the city's problems were getting better, 28% said they saw no change, and 25% said the problems had gotten worse."
    "Noise, Garbage Top Annoyances In City, Poll Finds" The New York Sun (7/13/06)

  • Baruch Alumni News
    "Scott M. Gutmanstein was previously an associate in the broker-dealer practice at Bingham McCutchen, where he provided support in the arena of securities regulation. Before that, he served as an equity trading supervisor for a NASDAQ market maker and was a registered representative for several major Wall Street firms. Gutmanstein holds a law degree from Pace University School of Law, a Master of Business Administration from Baruch College and a Bachelor of Arts from State University of New York at Albany."
    "Bracewell & Giuliani Adds Four Senior Attorneys" PRNewswire (7/9/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    SPA Prof. Doug Muzzio commented on NPR's Marketplace about Mayor Bloomberg's views on the illegal immigration debate. "He believes that the House approach is fundamentally flawed, impossible to execute, legally suspect and morally wrong. But, in addition to that, it won't work."
    "Bloomberg fights Feds on immigration" Marketplace (7/7/06)

  • Baruch Alumni News
    Max Berger ('68), winner of Baruch's 2006 Distinguished Alumnus Award, was quoted in an article examining the repercussions of the recent class action securities law firm scandal over the backdating of stock options. "One Bernstein Litowitz partner, Max W. Berger, attributed his firm's success to the careful vetting of cases. He expects ''some spillover'' from Milberg's troubles, but said that his firm had not ''seen an influx of business just yet.'' ''Quite frankly it's not something that we're focused on, because we handle our cases and operated well on our own,'' he said."
    "A Class Action Shuffle" The New York Times (7/706)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    SPA Prof. Doug Muzzio weighed in on the next New York governor's role in the gay marriage debate. "One thing is for sure, said Baruch College public affairs professor Douglas Muzzio, the current governor and Legislature will not grapple with the gay marriage question this year. "The new governor is going to provide leadership in one way or another on this," he said. "Certainly, this governor (Pataki) is not and this Legislature is not going to act on this issue. It's too explosive."
    "Next governor to play key role in marriage issue" Poughkeepsie Journal; "Gay marriage faces new fight" Rochester Democrat and Chronicle (7/7/06)

  • Baruch Student News
    Baruch MBA candidate Jeremy Merrill is running for district commissioner of Hempstead's troubled Sanitary District 1. He was quoted in a blog on the upcoming election. "Merrill, a newcomer to the political scene, is the Director of Operations at Weill-Cornell Medical College, and currently a candidate for an MBA in Management at Baruch College of the City University of New York. A registered Democrat, taking on what has become a bastion of GOP patronage, Merrill sees issues larger than political affiliation at stake. "This is not an issue of Republicans against Democrats, this is not an issue about party association. Our sanitation district is in desperate need of reform and it affects everyone, regardless of their party affiliation. Bringing about reform is rarely a simple feat, but there is an immediate need in our district."
    "Showdown in Sanitary District 1" The Community Alliance (7/6/06)

  • Baruch Staff Expertise
    Tony Martignetti, a member of Baruch's a planned giving team, was mentioned in the Journal 's recent piece on philanthropy. "Still, once the money is out of your pocket and in the charity's coffers, it's irrevocable, which means you can't take the gift back. For some people, therefore, bequests are a safer bet because they can change the terms of their will -- including how much they'll give and to whom -- until they die, says Tony Martignetti, a New York fund-raising consultant for charities."
    "A Lesson From Buffett: Give While Living: Billionaire's Gift Shows Benefits
    Of Giving Now -- Still, Some Donors Can Risk Running Out of Funds" The Wall Street Journal (7/5/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    SPA Prof. Doug Muzzio commented on the allocation of federal relief funding for the eastern Atlantic states damaged by recent flooding. "Is he punishing New York because we have Democratic senators? I don't know, but clearly the need is here," said Doug Muzzio, a political scientist from Baruch College, speaking by phone yesterday from flooded Delaware County."
    "A flood of requests to aid NY; Devastation upstate could reach well past $100M estimate, as lawmakers press for federal disaster funds" Newsday (7/4/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    The un-naming of the city's correctional facility in Lower Manhatttan after former police commissioner Bernard B. Kerik, recently indicted on bribery charges, was the subject of SPA Prof. Doug Muzzio's latest comment to Newsday. "I think the mayor had to do it; it's a little bit unseemly that you would
    have a facility named after an admitted criminal," said Doug Muzzio, a political science professor at Baruch College and a City Hall observer."
    "Name-dropping; Manhattan jail complex ditches sign referring to Kerik after he strikes deal over illegal gifts" Newsday (7/3/06)


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Baruch in the Media - Archive - June 2006

  • Baruch College News
    "Baruch College has been ranked the nation's number one producer of minority business management, marketing and related support baccalaureates in 2006 by "Diverse: Issues in Higher Education" magazine. Baruch took fourth place as a producer of Hispanic and Asian-American business, marketing and related support undergraduate degrees, and ranked as the nation’s fifth producer of African-American undergraduates with business and marketing BAs."
    "Degree Producers 2006" Diverse: Issues in Higher Education (6/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "The Geopolitics of Academic Writng," (University of Pittsburgh Press, 2002), by Baruch literature professor Suresh Canagarajah, was reviewd by Wendy Belcher for UCLA's AsiaMedia. "Canagarajah, who now teaches at Baruch College in New York, is particularly eloquent about the unfair mining of periphery scholars' thoughts. While many have written about EuroAmerican intellectual imperialism, most of their books are theoretical. Few have Canagarajah's vividness, which makes the disjuncture real through the biographies of his colleagues and friends, through detailed descriptions of Sri Lankan university department talks and debates and through his own lived experience. Most academic books are not beautifully written. His is. It a triumph over the depersonalization and casual citation that mars so much center scholarship."
    "Deconstructing the international marketplace of ideas:A Sri Lankan professor's book discusses the problems that non-Western scholars face in academic publishing" AsiaMedia News Daily (6/29/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    Baruch sociology professor and recognized expert on Mexican transnationalism, Robert C. Smith,  was quoted in an article examining the presidential candiates in Mexico's upcoming election, and how the the result will affect nationals, regardless of their immigration status, on this side of the border. "But the candidates have similar policies when it comes to immigration, said Robert C. Smith, an associate professor of immigration studies and public affairs at Baruch College in New York City. Although they won't call it an amnesty because of the political overtones of the word, they want the undocumented to receive legal status, Smith said. "Obrador is not the socialist they say he is. He is not Hugo Chavez. And Calderon is not just a capitalist as critics say," Smith said. "They both are pro-immigrant."
    "Mexican immigrants' hopes tied to election" The Journal News (6/29/06)

  • Baruch Alumni News
    Baruch alumnus Richard E. Organisciak, a Long Island school superintendent, was appointed to lead the New Rochelle school district on August 15. "Organisciak, 55, has helped improve graduation rates in the Deer Park schools he worked at formerly, and increase the number of Advanced Placement courses.Organisciak said he was interested in working for New Rochelle because it shares some of the qualities of suburban Deer Park and the large urban school district of New York City. "A big part of where I think that I can actually see myself doing my best work at this stage in my career is probably in between those two," he said. Organisciak holds a law degree from New York Law School, a bachelor's degree in English and a master's degree in educational administration and supervision from Bernard Baruch College."
    "Long Island educator to lead New Rochelle district" The Journal News (6/29/06)

  • Baruch Student News
    "Four months after a terrifying car accident cost Andrew Tsai a leg and nearly his life, the Queens teen yesterday picked up his high school diploma as his classmates roared in approval. After commencement ceremonies at Francis Lewis High School, the enthusiastic 18-year-old from Fresh Meadows set his sights on his next stop: Baruch College, where he'll study business. "I feel a lot better," said Tsai, who hopes to one day manage a restaurant or hotel. "I'm very excited about college."
    "Andrew's accolades" Daily News (6/27/06)

  • Baruch Alumni News
    News of JoAnn Ryan's (BBA '79), recent promotion made the Wall Street Journal's Who's News section. Ryan is also a trustee of the Baruch College Fund. "CONSOLIDATED EDISON Inc. (New York) -- " JoAnn F. Ryan, 48,  was named senior vice president in charge of purchasing, central field  services, energy management and information resources for the regulated business in the Con Edison family of companies."
    "Who's News Briefs" The Wall Street Journal (6/26/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    SPA Prof. Doug Muzzio commented on the nature of political events in a recap of the Bronx Dems' annual fund-raising dinner held recently. "Political party dinners have a dynamic all their own. Doug Muzzio, public affairs professor at Baruch College, calls them "schmoozefests and business confabs." "The business deals and the political deals are made there. It's all the movers and shakers and dealmakers," he said. "It's classic machine politics."
    " 'Schmoozefest' for Dems" Daily News (6/26/06)

  • Baruch Alumni News
    XM Satellite Radio president and CEO Hugh Panero (EMBA '89) was the subject of a recent profile in the business section of the New York Times.
    "Getting By, Getting Through" The New York Times (6/25/06)


  • Baruch College News
    Major business media referenced the predictions of rising inflation in the latest CFO Outlook Survey conducted quarterly by Zicklin and FEI. "Prices of products will increase an average of 3.3% over the next twelve months, according to CFO forecasts in this quarter's "CFO Outlook Survey," conducted by Financial Executives International (FEI) and Baruch College's Zicklin School of Business."
    "CFOs Double Their Price Forecasts; Cap Ex to Rise, Hiring Plans Remain Unchanged Say Fed Should Hold Steady on Rates" PRNewswire; "CFOs Report Hefty Post-Sarbanes Hiring" CFO.com; "Inflation forecasts rise among US CFOs - survey" Reuters; "Business Notebook" Boston Globe; "Finance chiefs forecast prices to rise more steeply, survey shows" The Associated Press; "Finance chiefs predict rising prices" AFX; "Finance chiefs predict rising prices" FXStreet.com; "Survey: CFOs agree with Enron verdict" WebCPA.com; "CFOs weigh in on economy, outsourcing, Bush vs. Kerry" Accounting Today (6/22/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    Accounting Prof. Norman Strauss was quoted in an AP story about Miocrosoft Corp.'s stock-options grant practices in the early 1990s. "The important date in determining if an option was in the money, and so therefore should be expensed, was the date on which the company knew the exercise price and how many options would be issued, said Norman Strauss, an accounting professor at Baruch College."
    "Microsoft defends its options dating" The Associated Press; SmartPros Accounting (6/22/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    Baruch Professor of Economics June O’Neill was a guest on the Lehrer News Hour discussing proposals to raise the national minimum wage (she is opposed). Prof. O’Neill is the Director of Baruch’s Center for Business and Government. She was Director of the Congressional Budget Office from 1995-99.
    "Lehrer News Hour"  PBS (6/21/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "Corporate social entrepreneurship--loosely defined as leveraging business smarts to achieve social change--is nothing new. In the past few years, however, the concept has become mainstream, as companies like Starbucks and Timberland seek out socially responsible vendors not only to provide quality goods but also to help create a positive image. Such partnerships, which are often made with businesses in disadvantaged communities or countries, supply corporations with instant social responsibility, says Edward Rogoff, a business professor at Baruch College in New York City. "They are not going to get a surprise story that they are buying something from a slave owner."
    "Doing Well and Good" Inc.com (6/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    SPA Prof. Doug Muzzio commented on Thomas Suozzi's gubernatorial campaign tactics thus far. “The Suozzi campaign had a rationale when it began, but now, given the true inevitability of Eliot Spitzer, it looks more and more quixotic, almost irrational,” said Doug Muzzio, a political-science professor at Baruch College. “Now he is just out there railing against the fates, and that ain’t going to work.”
    "Deep In Suozziland, Drums Beat Loud, Spitzer Runs Free" The New York Observer (6/21/06)

  • Baruch Student Expertise
    The Monterey County Herald ran a piece recounting the trials and tribulations of Dominique McClendon, a 20-year-old women's basketball player in search of a team to play on and a school to attend after a series of scholarships offered to her were withdrawn. "What followed was a series of disappointments that left the 20-year-old McClendon without a college to play at next season -- until Monday, when she officially committed to Baruch College in New York City. For the first time since the recruiting process began, McClendon felt wanted.So she was happy to sign with Baruch and spending the next two years in the Big Apple wasn't the only appeal. "I really clicked with the coach," McClendon said. "All the players were so welcoming. I get the city life. You really don't get that in Monterey."
    "Recruiting nightmare with a happy ending" The Herald (6/20/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    Zicklin Prof. Bryan Donefer commented how techonolgy has changed and shaped today's traders. "Once you had this huge influx of market data, you had to have people who understood the math,"  says Bernard Donefer, adjunct assistant professor in the department of statistics and computer information systems at Baruch College's Zicklin School of Business in New York. From 1996 through 2002, he was SVP and head of capital  markets systems at Fidelity Investments in Boston. "There's a huge number of ex-physicists in this  business," notes Donefer, "and anybody who's been in the business has seen it go on for the past four or   five years. The whole strategy has become different."
    "Matching People and Technology: How Automation and Market Pressures Have Changed the Personality and Culture of the Prop Desk" Securities Industry News (6/19/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "Bloomberg has been highly critical of the government from guns to
    immigration to stem cell research, and it's more than a critique of the
    government, it's a critique of the president," a professor of public affairs at
    Baruch College, Douglas Muzzio
    , said. "At the same time, the mayor is the diplomatic leader of this city, and when the president lands in the city, the
    mayor of New York should greet him."
    "In Shift, Mayor To Greet Bush At JFK Airport" The New York Sun (6/19/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    Dr. Hector Cordero-Guzman, associate professor of sociology and chair of Baruch’s Department of Black and Hispanic Studies, has been appointed to the newly formed Temporary Commission on Day Laborer Job Centers. "A New York City panel is examining whether the city should subsidize job centers for day laborers to link this overwhelmingly immigrant work force to prospective employers and curb wage and workplace abuses. Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg and the City Council speaker, Christine C. Quinn, appointed the commission, which held its first public hearing on Wednesday evening. Its goal is to evaluate the legal issues surrounding the job centers and determine whether public financing and oversight would be feasible."
    "City to Consider Job Center for Day Labor" The New York Times (6/16/06)

  • Baruch Student Expertise
    "Mary E. O'Regan was selected to receive a BP Community Scholarship for the 2006-2007 school year based on a personal essay, academic performance, extra-curricular activities, work experience, individual goals and demonstrated financial need.  She is one of 80 recent high school graduates and returning college students who live in or near New York City selected by BP America."
    BP Community Scholarship Program Awards $112,000 in Scholarships PRNewswire (6/15/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "Mayor Bloomberg may or may not harbor any ambitions of becoming the nation's next President - but the buzz surrounding a possible White House bid is helping him and the city, experts say. "Irrespective of what happens, of course it's beneficial to him," said Doug Muzzio, a professor of public affairs at Baruch College. "It's lame-duck inoculation. He's defining the agenda. He's relevant.... He's a player."
    "Prez rumors don't hurt Mike a bit" Daily News (6/14/06)

  • Baruch Alumni News
    The Bond Buyer profiled Baruch alumnus Nancy Feldman, who was recently appointed New Jersey's public finance director. "Feldman took over last month as director of New Jersey's office of public finance just as the state was about to price the market's largest deal of the year -- a $2.8 billion sale for the Transportation Trust Fund Authority. As director of public finance, Feldman oversees the issuance of state debt, and is also responsible for all issues affecting New Jersey's credit. A New Jersey resident for the past 18 years, Feldman lives with her husband and three children in Bedminster. Prior to being named director, she was vice president of risk management and advisory -- which involved advising clients on how to get the best rating possible on their deals -- at Goldman, Sachs & Co. She earned a degree in economics from the State University of New York at Albany, and a master's of business administration in finance from Baruch College."
    "N.J.'s Nancy Feldman Hits the Ground Running as State Public Finance Head" The Bond Buyer (6/13/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    Zicklin finance Prof. Linda Allen was quoted in an article examining the rise of start-up, or de novo banks. "A key to success for small banks is that they "are better able to use soft information that they acquire by being close to the community," a professor of finance and economics at Baruch College, Linda Allen, said.
    "Start-Up Banks Seek To Float With Customer Service" The New York Sun (6/13/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "Already in 2006, the Conservative Party - despite its meager 155,000
    registrations - caused a stir with an early endorsement of John Faso for
    governor, in what turned out to be a watershed in Faso's battle to wrest the
    Republican nomination from one-time frontrunner William Weld. But that may have been the most major role any minor party will play for the rest of this election season. And with Democrats holding significant leads in all statewide races, and none of the minors putting forth outsider candidates
    with enough strength to split a vote, their impact is negligible, said Doug
    Muzzio, political science professor at Baruch College
    ."
    "SPIN CYCLE: Newsday's guide to politics and politicians" Newsday (6/12/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    Prof. Allan Wernick answered readers' citizenship questions recently in his syndicated column. "Allan Wernick is an attorney and professor at Baruch College, City University of New York, and directs CUNY's Citizenship and Immigration Project. He is the author of "U.S. Immigration and Citizenship Your Complete Guide, Revised 4th Edition."
    "Dual citizenship can be permitted" Sun-Sentinel (6/11/06)

  • Baruch Student Expertise
    "The Baruch College Athletic Department is proud to announce that junior women's tennis player Kateryna Pylypyshyna has been voted to the ESPN The Magazine Academic All-District Second Team (College Division, Div II & III).The selection marks the first time in school history that a student-athlete from Baruch has been voted to first or second team. Kateryna, who owns a splendid 3.98 GPA, is majoring in Operations Management with a double minor in Psychology and Finance. She was one of the top players last fall in women's tennis, playing # 1 singles and helping lead Baruch to ther first CUNYAC Final in over 10 years. The 10 wins were also the most during the past decade of competition."
    "Kateryna Pylypyshyna Named ESPN The Magazine Academic All-District Second Team" (6/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    SPA Prof. Doug Muzzio commented on the NY attorney general's race. "Clearly, the convention gave Cuomo some bump," said Doug Muzzio, a political science professor at Baruch College. But, he said, "the key number is the huge number of undecideds. It's still an open race."
    "Cuomo increases lead" Newsday (6/9/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    SPA Prof. Doug Muzzio commented on what John Faso, GOP candidate in the NY governor's race, must do to win. "Baruch College political science professor Doug Muzzio said Faso must stay focused on his pledge to hold the line on state taxes. "Taxes is a universal issue that transcends ideology, so I don't think he has to trim his sails or run away from his voting record," Muzzio said."
    "Weld drops out of N.Y. governor's race" Daily News (6/7/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    Weissman History Prof. Ervand Abrhamian's scholarship on Iran was cited in an article testing readers knowledge of the country's history over the last 50 years. "There is some controversy regarding b) with differing assessments of whether Iranians could safely demonstrate in favor of the US after 9/11. Ervand Abrahamian, a Distinguished Professor of History at Baruch College, says the Iran government did allow pro-American demonstrations after 9/11."
    "Iran Quiz" www.dissidentvoice.org (6/6/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    SPA Prof. Doug Muzzio commented on Rudy Giuliani's ability to criticize the recent cuts to New York's antiterrorism federal allocation without saying a bad word about President Bush, the Dept. of Homeland Security, or the GOP. "The guy is running for President and he doesn't want to tick off the Republican base," said Baruch College political science Prof. Doug Muzzio. "He is clearly looking at the issue through a wide lens, and given his political ambitions, it's probably the lens he should be using."
    "Rudy rages at terror funds ax" Daily News (6/6/06)

  • Baruch College News
    The 2006 CFO survey conducted by the Zicklin School and FEI was mentioned in a commentary by Mark Hulbert on the effect of inflation on stocks. "In this regard, I note that - just as you would expect to be the case, given rising inflation in recent months - Standard & Poor's reported in Monday's edition of its newsletter, "The Outlook," that 71% of companies are planning to raise the prices of their products. This was the finding of a survey of 200 companies' chief financial officers conducted by Baruch College's Zicklin School of Business and an organization called Financial Executives International."
    "Is inflation really a threat?" Marketwatch.com (6/6/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "If there were any lingering doubts that Mr. Bloomberg is a RINO--a Republican in Name Only--his latest pronouncements have erased them. "I think it's clear he's not running in the Republican [Presidential] primaries in '08," Doug Muzzio, a political-science professor at Baruch College, says with a laugh."
    "Bloomberg in '08?; Never Say Never!" The New York Observer (6/5/06)

  • Baruch College News
    The front page of The New York Times' Job Market section featured an article about a seminar series on U.S. business basics for Russian speakers in their native language, conducted by businessman Len Bersh at Baruch's Field Center for Entrepreneurship. "The series is the latest offering for would-be entrepreneurs at the school's Lawrence N. Field Center for Entrepreneurship, which provides business training and financial advice through seminars, workshops and one-on-one counseling, helping some 1,200 aspiring and existing business owners start or expand small businesses each year. The center's offerings — 45 different workshops were scheduled last year — cover basics like e-commerce, franchising and how to develop a business plan, and also specialty topics, like doing business in China and running a home-based business. A recent pilot program focused on business resources for people with disabilities. A workshop for technology entrepreneurs, aimed at scientists interested in commercializing their work, is planned for the fall."
    "For Entrepreneurs From Russia, A Short Course in Capitalism" The New York Times (6/4/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    Is 666 the mark of the devil or a once in a century opportunity for clever marketing ploys? Marketing adjunct Robb Hecht weighed in. "As many marketers and publicists know, feeding into people's fears is a great way to build interest in a brand," said Robb Hecht, an adjunct professor at New York City's Baruch College who lectures on the social psychology of branding and pop culture trends."
    "Tuesday is 6-6-06: A once-a-century date or a sign?" Star Tribune (6/4/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "With the conclusion of this audit, ICCA has determined that Mattel's GMP continues to play an important role in leading contractor manufacturing facilities to achieve or even surpass compliance standards in safety, maintenance, employee communications, payroll and working conditions, which in turn benefits the entire industry," said Dr. S. Prakash Sethi, chairman of ICCA and University Distinguished Professor, Zicklin School of Business, Baruch College."
    "International Center for Corporate Accountability Announces Independent Audit Results for Additional Mattel Suppliers in China" PRNewswire (6/2/06)

  • Baruch Staff Expertise
    "Ben Corpus, Baruch College's vice president of enrollment management, has built his career making the most of his institutions' limited budgets. Here, Corpus gives four tips to stretch your institution's enrollment management dollars:
    1. Diversify your marketing mix so that it is staggered over a period of
    time.
    2. Improve the campus experience for open houses and orientations.
    3. Review historic applicant pools to identify academic indicators and
    geodemographics."
    Profile, Enrollment Management News (6/1/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    SPA Prof. Doug Muzzio commented on former New York Assembly Minority Leader John Faso's victory as the GOP candidate for governor, defeating former Massachusetts Gov. Bill Weld, who was the the assumed favorite of the party's establishment. "Faso’s Republican convention victory was considered a surprise, but could be attributed largely to his unwavering campaign to win delegate votes, said Doug Muzzio, a professor of public affairs at Baruch College, a branch of the City University of New York."
    "NY Gov.: In a Surprise, Faso Takes GOP Nod at Convention" CQPolitics.com (6/1/06)

  • Baruch College News
    The 2006 CFO survey conducted by FEI and the Zicklin School was cited in an article examining the new disclosure rules for executive compensation. "The reaction to the draft proposal was positive, according to a survey of CFOs conducted by Financial Executives International and Baruch College. The survey found that 71 percent of respondents supported the new disclosure rules  and 35 percent said they thought it would make companies less likely to award excessive pay.
    "CEO pay under the microscope" Electronic Business (6/1/06)

  • Baruch College News
    Baruch's Newman Institute was mentioned in a profile of the design for the new Mets stadium. "Architect Charles Lauster, who designed the plan with the Newman Institute at Baruch College, expanded the target zone from the triangle to include the Mets' stadium, its parking lots, and the open rail yards that U.S. Open fans must cross to get to the Tennis Center. "We are suggesting a deck be built over the rail yards"-just like the one planned for the Atlantic Yards-"and that a large building with an exposition center, a hotel, a shopping mall, and offices become this great spine that connects the Corona side to the Flushing side."
    "Flushing in 2016; Out in Queens, the far east is booming" New York Magazine (6/1/06)

  • Baruch College News
    "GIN, TONICS, AND ARCHITECTONICS A crowd gathered at Baruch College's Newman Institute for Real Estate Studies for the 2006 Temko Critics Panel, sponsored by the Forum for Urban Design and the Lincoln Institute of Land Policy. Guests enjoyed drinks before settling down for the program. Apropos of this, a host noted the time someone approached Benjamin Franklin, saying, "Mr. Franklin, at the punch bowl again? Must you drink to be witty?" To which Franklin riposted, "No, sir. I drink to make my companions witty."
    "Awards, Honors and Wit"  The New York Sun (6/1/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    Citizenship Now!, the CUNY-sponsored annual call-in that gives New York's undocumented immigrants the opportunity to raise their questions anonymously, without fear of being deported, was the subject of a recent profile. "Since the program began, three years ago, it has provided more than 27,000 immigrants, some calling from as far away as Florida and Japan, with free advice on how to gain naturalization, obtain citizenship for their children, adjust their own status, and apply for political asylum. This year many of the calls were about legislation pending in the U.S. Senate that could provide amnesty for some of the 11 million to 12 million undocumented immigrants living in the United States, says Allan Wernick, a professor at Baruch College and chairman of CUNY's Citizenship and Immigration Service. The callers, he says, "want to know: Will there be a bill? If there is, will I get a benefit?" Mr. Wernick warns volunteers not to give false hope. He advises them to tell callers that while a change in immigration policy is possible this year, it is not a sure thing."
    "At CUNY, an Immigration Hot Line Heats Up " The Chronicle of Higher Education (6/1/06)


    View complete Baruch in the Media archive


                            Baruch in the Media - Archive - May 2006
  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    SPA Prof. Doug Muzzio commented on Sen. Clinton's campaign announcement.
    "SCOTT TONG: Forty to one. That's the money advantage Clinton enjoys over any Republican Senate challenger. Still, Baruch College political scientist Douglas Muzzio expects her to spend a bunch of her 20 mil.
    DOUGLAS MUZZIO: They want a massacre here. They want to bury the Republicans. She wants to be slingshot out of this election. "
    "Positioning for 2008?" Marketplace Morning, NPR (5/31/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    An infamously controversial 1986 demographic study on marriage patterns in the U.S. by SPA Prof. Neil Bennett and others was re-examined in Newsweek's latest issue on the marriage 'crunch' today. Bennett was interviewed in a NBC Nightly News segment on the study, as well.
    "Too late for Prince Charming?" Newsweek (5/31/06); "Revisiting the 'Marriage Crunch' " NBC Nightly News (5/30/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    SPA Prof. Doug Muzzio commented on the rabid campaign tactics of Kathleen, "KT," McFarland, a GOP contender for incumbent Sen. John Spencer's seat. "It's a sideshow in a sense," said Doug Muzzio, a political science professor at Baruch College in Manhattan. "There is no reasonable way that either of these two are going to pick off Clinton."
    "GOP foe resurrects Spencer's problematic past" The Journal News (5/31/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    Baruch students and Associate Prof. of Public Affairs Robert Smith were interviewed by WNYC's Daniela Gerson in a story examining the fate of Baruch graduates who are also illegal immigrants.
    REPORTER:Robert Smith is an associate professor at Baruch College and the Graduate Center at CUNY.
    SMITH: In terms of the long-term security and health of our society, creating a structurally excluded underclass of young people with ambitions but no way to fulfill them is a very dangerous recipe. If anything comes out of this bill, and all these political maneuverings, if they pass the Dream Act it would be the single greatest contribution they could make in terms of the immigration debate.
    REPORTER: The Dream Act, currently being considered as part of a larger Senate bill, would give legal status to students who pursue higher education and arrived when they were younger than 16. New York's Senators and Representatives have been key backers of the bill and CUNY's Chancellor testified before Congress advocating for it."
    "Illegal imigrants dread turning in IDs after graduation" WNYC (5/30/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    Zicklin management Prof. Edward Rogoff commented on the delays in getting electronic payment technology installed in NYC taxis. "There's been more than $1 billion in fares collected since the fare went up, and there's still nothing to show for it," said Edward Rogoff, a professor of management at Baruch College and a longtime critic of the city's taxi medallion system.
    "Taxicab Concessions" The Village Voice (5/30/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    SPA Prof. Doug Muzzio commeted on the unsual conduct of both parties at recent state conventions. "Usually, the Democrats are destroying one another and being entertaining, and the Republicans have this iron, Stalinist discipline. This is a total role reversal," said analyst Doug Muzzio of the Baruch College School of Public Affairs.
    "It's party time!" Daily News (5/30/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    SPA Prof. Doug Muzzio commented on the New York governor's race. "Once Schumer decided to stay in the Senate, Spitzer had a clear field," said Baruch College political science Professor Douglas Muzzio. "He took on an aura of invincibility. He's considered the governor-elect and nobody has cast a ballot yet."
    "Spitzer, Suozzi set to battle at convention" Press & Sun Bulletin (5/29/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    SPA Prof. Doug Muzzio commented on the respect shown to Eliot Spitzer by other candidates in the attorney general's race. "He is the 900-pound gorilla and, man, you don't want to tick off the gorilla," said Doug Muzzio, a Baruch College political science professor. "He is America's Attorney General like Rudy Giuliani was America's Mayor. They [the candidates] are attempting to identify with him and say, 'I'm going to follow in his footsteps.'"
    "Dems: Spitzer is an El of a guy" Daily News (5/29/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    SPA Prof. Doug Muzzio commented on the benefits Sen. Clinton will reap in the 2008 election from the support of her husband. "Bill Clinton is an asset," said Baruch College public affairs professor Doug Muzzio. "She would be foolish, both in a political sense and a personal sense, not to have him by her side. he'll activate the base, particularly the black base, in a way that Hillary herself couldn't."
    "Bill takes starring role to hail his Hill" New York Post (5/28/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    SPA Prof. Doug Muzzio commented on the surge of opposition for William Weld, the GOP chairman's pick for governor of New York. "It's a real role reversal," said Baruch College political science expert Doug Muzzio. "The Democrats are holding coronations and the Republicans are having circular firing squads...they're cross-dressing."
    "Parties are defying all 'conventions' "New York Post (5/28/06)
  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    SPA Dean David Birdsell commented on Mayor Bloomberg's recent support for national issues with a decidely Democratic tone. “Clearly this is a sharp break. It’s not something that's going to make you popular in a Republican Party primary, but if you assume that the Republican Party will have to reinvent itself after George Bush, this is clearly one of the ways that many people will be interested in reinventing it,” said Baruch College Dean David Birdsell. “Smart about business, smart about results, caring about people, and hard-nosed about science - that's not necessarily a Democratic or a Republican point of view. It’ll be interesting to see what Michael Bloomberg does with this. Of course, he has said he is not interested in higher office.”
    "Bloomberg Takes on National GOP on A Host of Issues" NY1 News (5/26/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    As pundits ponder whether Mayor Bloomberg is in the early stages of preparation for a potential national campaign, SPA Dean David Birsell commented in a recent article. "The interim dean at Baruch College's school of public affairs, David Birdsell, said Mr. Bloomberg was clearly using his office as a bully pulpit on a national scale. "If you look at what Bloomberg is calling attention to in this speech, it is clear that he is attacking national issues," Mr. Birdsell said. "He certainly sounds like a person who at least during these remaining three years wants to use the mayoralty to shape a national conversation, if not a national candidacy," he said."
    "Mayor Criticizes Faith-Based Sciences " New York Sun (5/26/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    SPA Prof. Doug Muzzio commented on Mayor Bloomberg's recent Democratic overtures, like declining to attend the GOP 's Long Island converntion next week and non-GOP party endorsements. "If Spitzer is holding anywhere near the lead he's holding now, [Bloomberg] is likely to endorse him," said Doug Muzzio, a professor of public affairs at Baruch College.
    "Mayor Looking Quite the Dem These Days" Daily News (5/25/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    SPA Prof. Doug Muzzio commented on Mayor Bloomberg's recent airing of national policy ideas, lately promoting his plan for a national DNA or fingerprint database that would track the citizenship status of all workers. "It's Mike Bloomberg, the mayor of a city of immigrants, weighing in on a national issue," a professor of public affairs at Baruch College, Douglas Muzzio, said. "The thing that intrigues me is this increased national exposure on the part of the mayor. He's really crafting a national agenda for whatever reason. That exposure certainly gives credence to this idea of Mike Bloomberg 2008."
    "Bloomberg Touts National Database For Tracking Citizenship Status" The New York Sun (5/25/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    Best-selling author and Baruch English Department adjunct Dave King has won the 2006-2007 Rome Prize in Literature. The fellowshp includes a modest stipend to work on his next novel while living for a year in a studio on top of the Janiculum, Rome's highest hill. King’s debut novel, The Ha-Ha, was named one of the best books of 2005 by the Washington Post, the Christian Science Monitor, and the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, while Warner Brothers bought the movie rights. The prize is awarded annually to 30 emerging artists and scholars in 10 different fields within the Arts and Humanities, including Architecture, Design, Musical Composition, Modern Italian Studies, and Visual Arts.
    "Baruch's Dave King Wins Rome Prize in Literature" (5/24/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "Franklin, France, and the Birth of America," an account of the years between the Declaration of Independence and the end of the Revolutionary War when Benjamin Franklin represented the new American republic in Paris, has won the second annual $50,000 George Washington Prize. The choice for the year's best book on the period was made by scholars of early American history. They include Carol Berkin of Baruch College, City University of New York; Walter Isaacson of the Aspen Institute; and Gordon Wood of Brown University."
    "Book on Benjamin Franklin Wins Prize" The Associated Press;"Schiff Wins Washington Book Prize for Work on Franklin" Washington Post (5/24/06)

  • Baruch Staff Expertise
    Baruch College staffers, Ovid O. Forde, fire safety specialist, and Rick Duskiewicz, locksmith, co-authored an illumninating article on glow-in-the-dark signage's ability to improve emergency evacuations. "A portion of one of these laws, called Local Law 26, mandated the installation of photo-luminescent (glow-in-the-dark) exit path markings to aid in the safety and speedy evacuation of high-rise buildings in the event both primary and secondary power supplies fail."
    "New York City Improves Emergency Egress with Photo-Luminescent (Glow-in-the-Dark) Signage" Locksmith Ledger International (5/06)

  • Baruch College News
    Bernard Baruch's co-authored tome on group think was mentioned on FXstreet.com's feature about the seven big financial things you need to know but never seem to learn in the classroom. Baruch's work was cited under #3 The Mind is More Important than the Tools. "The financial markets, no matter how they may be characterized otherwise, are a collection of individuals interacting with each other. As such, it is important for us to understand the impact of collective psychology. You merely have to watch the markets to see the impact of group think. The bubble in internet stocks that burst in 2000 is a perfect example. Clear-headed market analysis went out the window as everyone jumped on the bandwagon thinking that there was no way to lose. Then, on the downside it was the exact opposite. The no one wanted anything to do with stocks in certain sectors, not because of any legitimate evaluation, but because they had been burned before. This sort of thing happens to greater or lesser degrees all the time, in all time frames. A very good book on the topic is Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds by Charles MacKay and Bernard M. Baruch. It explores the whole topic of manias, especially where it relates to the financial arena, and should give you an excellent view in to mob mentality.'
    "Seven Big Things Professors Won’t Teach You (But You Should Know)" FXstreet.com (5/23/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    Dall Forsythe, a Distinguished Lecturer on governmental and nonprofit financial management at Baruch's Zicklin School of Business, commented on S&P's upgrade of New York City's debt rating."Dall W. Forsythe, an expert on public finance at Baruch College, said the upgrade was an important step in the city's decades-long journey from the fiscal abyss of the mid-1970's. ''It means the city can borrow a little more cheaply and does not have to pay quite as high interest rates,'' he said. ''It means that a slightly larger group of investors will be willing to buy the city's bonds.''
    "Standard & Poor's Upgrades City's Credit Rating to Best Ever" The New York Times (5/23/06)

  • Baruch College News
    Baruch was mentioned in a front page article extolling the rise of CUNY's Honors College. "So far, more than $25 million in private funds have poured in to support the honors college, which has expanded to seven campuses from five. Applications were up almost 40% for the 2006-07 year, climbing to 3,188 versus 2,300 last year. By this fall, a total of about 1,400 of the city's most outstanding students will be enrolled in the program at the participating campuses: Hunter, Brooklyn, City, Queens, Baruch, Lehman, and the College of Staten Island."
    "Program revives CUNY cum laude" Crain's New York Business (5/22-26/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    Prof. of Finance Robert Schwartz NYSE's proposal to buy several European stock exchanges on NPR's "All Things Considered" with Adam Davidson. "It's just too early to tell if these consolidations will be good news or bad news for investors, says Baruch College Finance Professor Robert Schwartz "Mr. ROBERT SCHWARTZ (Baruch College): It's early news and I, well I'm always a hopeful, optimistic guy myself and sure, my immediate response is that it's good news. DAVIDSON: Schwartz says he's not sure yet whether these mergers will mean stock trading fees will go up or down. Mergers could mean lower fees because bigger exchanges are more efficient. With more stocks, they can charge less for each trade and still make money. But it could go the other way. The NYSE could get so big that it becomes something of a monopoly. Then it could charge higher fees without fear of losing business to competitors. Mr. SCHWARTZ: The big question is, how is it implemented? And as we say, the devil's in the details and some of these details are pretty large."
    "NYSE Buys Control of Several European Markets"NPR - All Things Considered (5/22/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    SPA Prof. Doug Muzzio commented on Democrat and former Buffalo federal prosecutor Denise O'Donnell's campaign strategy in the New York state attorney general's race. "Denise O'Donnell's message is, 'I'm not them,'" said political consultant Doug Muzzio of Baruch College's School of Public Affairs. "That's not enough."
    "This lady's not 1st in state AG race, but she still vies" Daily News (5/22/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    Anthropology Prof. Ken Guest  commented in an article examining the Bible study practices of Chinese immigrants who use the phone to connect to a network of Christianity. "Although reliable numbers are difficult to come by because most Fujianese are here illegally, it is estimated that 300,000 immigrants from the Fuzhou region are in the United States, with the largest concentration, about 60,000 to 70,000, in New York City, said Kenneth J. Guest, a Baruch College anthropology professor who wrote the book ''God in Chinatown'' (New York University Press, 2003). "
    "Immigrants Hear God's Word, In Chinese, by Conference Call" The New York Times; International Herald Tribune (5/21/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    SPA Prof. Doug Muzzio commented on whether Sen. Clinton's popularity in New York will translate to other states in time for the 2008 presidential election."Douglas Muzzio, professor of public affairs at the City University of New York's Baruch College, also has doubts about how transferable the skills Clinton demonstrated in New York may be to a national audience. "I'm agnostic on it. I neither support or oppose it. I just don't necessarily see it," he said. "New York is not the nation. Even conservative New Yorkers are not conservative South Carolinians or conservative Wyomingans. There are red portions in this blue state, but they're not deep, deep red."
    "Hillary: New York state has embraced her. Will the rest of the country if she runs for president?" Chicago Tribune; NewsBusters (5/21/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    SPA's Interim Dean David Birdsell commented on the heckling Sen. McCain received as the commencement speaker at the New School last week. “He's trying to paint himself as a conservative. He's trying to position himself in Republican primary,” said David Birdsell of Baruch College.
    "Senator McCain Heckled by Students at New School Graduation" NY1 News.com (5/19/06)

  • Baruch College News
    Bank of America announced that Nathaniel Younger, a graduating senior at Baruch, has won the highly competitive and coveted 2006 Youth Entrepreneur Award contest. Contestants in the annual citywide business competition were asked to create and operate an entrepreneurial business at least three months in existence that shows great promise. "The watch business led to another brainstorm - and yesterday Younger was named a Bank of America Young Entrepreneur and collected a $750 prize. "The idea is to reach out to young people who have an entrepreneurial spirit, to nourish that spirit, cherish it and direct it," said Peter Kostmayer, president of Citizens for NYC, which administered the contest."
    "Young biz whiz salvages top honors" Daily News (5/19/06)

  • Baruch College News
    The Baruch College Provost has been informed by Chancellor Goldstein that Ms. Sarah Li, a Baruch biology major with a 3.916 GPA, has been selected as a City University Jonas E. Salk Scholar. The award includes a $6,000 scholarship to support graduate study in medicine or biomedical research. In the words of the Chancellor: "A Salk Scholarship is one of the most prestigious awards bestowed upon a City University graduate."
    (5/18/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    Baruch College's Newman Real Estate Institute and it's director Henry Wollman, were mentioned in an article examining the development plans for the Brookyn waterfront in Williamsburgh. "The idea comes from Quadriad Realty Partners, an entity formed last year with some big players on its bench. At the top is Henry Wollman, the head of the Newman Institute, a real estate think tank at Baruch College that has advised city officials on how to restructure the city's zoning. Also on board is Maurice Regan (whose construction firm recently finished a new headquarters for the mayor's Bloomberg LP) and Brooklyn real estate figure William Ross. The prestigious financiers at Ackman-Ziff are on hand to line up investors. And Herman Badillo, the Latino political pioneer who moves in top Republican circles, is also on the team."
    "Fear of heights" The Village Voice (5/16/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    SPA Prof. Doug Muzzio commented on Mayor Bloomberg's moratorium on students' cell phone use in public schools. "In recent months, said Doug Muzzio, a public affairs professor at Baruch College, Mr. Bloomberg has been increasingly outspoken on a range of issues, frequently expressing the concerns of many New Yorkers, like the frustration over the pace of development at ground zero. On the phone issue, though, Mr. Bloomberg has seemed out of step, Mr. Muzzio continued. ''We've seen a more savvy mayor and a more feisty, outspoken mayor,'' he said. ''Then he steps on this false note, and then he sticks with it. Once the mayor gets it in his mind to do something, he doesn't stop until he is stopped, like with the West Side stadium.''
    "Cellphones In Schools: From Irritant To Brouhaha" The New York Times (5/15/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    Spa Prof. Doug Muzzio commented on Thomas Manton giving up his law career in order to keep his unpaid job as head of the Queens County Democratic Organization. "The courts remain the last major bastion of patronage for old-style machine-type organizations," a public policy professor at Baruch College, Douglas Muzzio, said. "It's very lucrative and it's a source of patronage for the political leaders. Clearly the rule is designed to mitigate that."
    "Manton Leaves Law for Unpaid Job as Queens Leader" The New York Sun (5/15/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    SPA Prof. Doug Muzzio commented on the effect the city's budget negoitiations are having on the so far cordial relationship between Mayor Bloomberg and Speaker Quinn. "A professor of public policy at Baruch College, Douglas Muzzio, said this year's budget differences did not amount to "divorce material," but that some conflict between the speaker and the mayor is to be expected. "I think they can do this civilly," he said."
    "Budget May Strain Mayor, Speaker's Sunny Relationship" The New York Sun (5/15/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    Weissman English Prof. David Reynolds reviewed The Brown Brothers, the Slave Trade, and the American Revolution (Simon & Schuster, 2006) by Charles Rappleye for the book review section of The New York Times. "David S. Reynolds, a university distinguished professor at Baruch College, is the author of ''John Brown, Abolitionist: The Man Who Killed Slavery, Sparked the Civil War, and Seeded Civil Rights." "Rappleye's book provides vivid testimony to the painful fact that the Browns and the tiny state they helped form were indeed all too much like America, fractured between the ideal of liberty and the reality of chattel slavery."
    "Family Business" The New York Times (5/14/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    SPA Prof. Doug Muzzio commented on Naussau County executive Tom Suozzi's outsider campaign strategy in the governor's race. "Doug Muzzio of the Baruch College School of Public Affairs agrees Suozzi is in a tough spot. "He's got a real record. He's got a real agenda. He's talking about real issues. However, he's got a guy in front of him who is eminently qualified to be governor," Muzzio said. "Unless Eliot's got a closetful of skeletons - or has some mammoth public mental breakdown - he ain't gonna lose." Suozzi has "got to change the dynamics of the race, and it's going to be very difficult," he added. "So what he's doing is [a] bomb-thrower strategy . . . and I have doubts about its ultimate effects."
    "GOV RACE HANDICAP. Insiders aren't betting on Suozzi's outsider act" Daily News (5/14/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    SPA Prof. Doug Muzzio commented on Assemblyman Richard Brodsky's withdrawal from the race for state attorney general prompted by his decision to donate a kidney to his ailing teenage daughter. "This is a simple story about a father's love for his daughter," said Doug Muzzio, a Baruch College political science professor. Muzzio and others suggested Brodsky's political future will likely remain in the state Legislature, or perhaps in Congress. "He has a legislative temperament," Muzzio said."
    "High praise from fellow lawmakers" Daliy News (5/12/06)

  • Baruch College News
    "The Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) is considering lowering the threshold for recognizing a public company's potential loss from pending litigation, a board member disclosed in a recent forum. Lowering the percentage for potential loss of a pending lawsuit is one of the options on the table for the FASB, said board member Leslie Seidman at the Financial Reporting Conference at Baruch College in New York, May 4, according to CFO.com."
    "FASB Mulls Change to Rule on Pending Lawsuits" Accountingweb.com (5/11/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    SPA Prof. Doug Muzzio commented on Sen. Clinton's lack of comment on proposals to remove a tariff on ethanol to help lower gas prices, but is unpopular in Iowa, a major producer of the corn-derivative alternative fuel. "The more cynical interpretation is she wants to avoid answering tough questions until it's no longer politically dangerous, but it's probably some of both," said Baruch College political scientist Doug Muzzio. "A leave-your-options-open kind of politician is not necessarily a bad one," said Muzzio. "If it becomes an endemic political trait where it's more like indecisiveness, that could be."
    "Corn flakey: Hil turns a deaf ear on push to nix ethanol tax" Daily News (5/11/06)

  • Baruch College News
    The Zicklin School of Business was mentioned in The Wall Street Journal's examination of course offerings at some of the nation's top business schools aimed at aiding mothers returning to the workforce. 
    "Business Schools Target At-Home Moms" The Wall Street Journal (5/10/6)

  • Baruch College Alumni
    The New York Times Company today announced that Susan Telesmanic, managing director of loyalty and retention for the circulation department of The New York Times, has been appointed vice president of consumer marketing effective immediately. Ms. Telesmanic joined The New York Times in 1993 as a senior analyst to the chief financial officer. Before joining The Times, Ms. Telesmanic was a senior associate at Deloitte & Touche, LLP where she specialized in media and publishing. Ms. Telesmanic earned an MBA degree from St. John's University in 1996 and a BBA degree in accounting from Baruch College in 1988 and is also a Certified Public Accountant.
    "The New York Times Company Names Susan Telesmanic Vice President, Consumer Marketing" BusinessWire (5/9/06)

  • Baruch College Alumni
    "(New Jersey) Governor Jon Corzine appointed another former Goldman Sachs Group Inc. colleague to his administration, naming Nancy Feldman to oversee the state's borrowing. Feldman, 45, was most recently head of research for Goldman's municipal-bond department. "Nancy has an impressive background in municipal finance, and her insight and experience will be a tremendous asset in the management of New Jersey's debt," said Treasurer Bradley Abelow in a statement. At Goldman, she was responsible for credit analysis of state and local government credits, and transportation, housing and non-profit projects. Feldman received a bachelor of arts in economics from Albany State University and an MBA from Baruch College."
    "Corzine hires another exec from Goldman" Bloomberg News; NorthJersey.com; The Record (5/9/06)

  • Baruch College News
    The Hispanic Outlook in Higher Education ranked Baruch College 53rd in its list of the top 100 colleges offering undergraduate degrees to Hispanics in 2004-05.
    "Top 100 Colleges & Universities Enrolling & Graduating Hispanics" The Hispanic Outlook in Higher Education (5/8/06)

  • Baruch College News
    "The Baruch College Fund benefited from its annual awards dinner, which was given at Cipriani 42nd Street, with 550 guests, raising $1.2 million. (Baruch College President) KATHLEEN WALDRON, with those honored, MAX W. BERGER, left, and STEPHEN B. SIEGEL."
    "Style Desk-Evening Hours: Rites of Spring" The New York Times (5/7/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    SPA Prof. Doug Muzzio  commented on Mayor Bloomberg's recently aggressive role in the redevelopment plans for Ground Zero. "Now that the governor is not only a lame duck but a dead duck, and he's shown absolutely no leadership on this whatsoever, the mayor has taken control," said Doug Muzzio, professor of public affairs at Baruch College."
    "Mike Takes WTC Bull by the Horns" Daily News (5/7/06)

  • Baruch College News
    Michael Nina
    of Baruch College's Career Development Center was quoted along with some Baruch students for NPR reporter Mike Pesca's segment on job prospects for the college class of ' 06, on the NPR program "Day to Day." Nina was leading a seminar at Baruch's Career Development Center when he says on air "that more companies want to come recruit at Baruch than we can even make space for in the building." Nina say to the students, "You are very, very desirable to companies."
    "Job Prospects Bright for '06 College Grads" NPR: Day to Day (5/5/06)

  • Baruch College News
    The SEC's chief accountant Scott Taub addressed the costly implementation of section 404 of the Sarbanes Oxley Act at Zicklin's recent financial reporting conference. "If you think 404 does nothing for fraud, you're doing it wrong," Taub told an audience Thursday morning at the Fifth Annual Financial Reporting Conference at the Zicklin Schoolof Business at Baruch College."
    "SEC Chief Accountant Defends 404" CFO.com (5/4/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "(Society of American Business Editors and Writers) SABEW, with 3,500 members, is the leading trade group for business journalists. The three officers assumed their new jobs at the organization's 43rd annual conference in Minneapolis/St. Paul from April 30 to May 2. Five incumbent governors were re-elected: Josh Mills, director, master's program in business journalism, Baruch College/CUNY."
    "New Board Members and Officers at SABEW" BusinessWire (5/3/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    SPA Prof. Doug Muzzio commented on Mayor Bolomberg's attempt to block Albany's restrictions on the city's power of eminent domain."The issue put Mr. Bloomberg in the center of yet another national debate. A professor of public policy at Baruch College, Douglas Muzzio, called Mr. Bloomberg the "mayoral Robert Moses" and said eminent domain is a powerful tool that the mayor doesn't want to give up.
    "Mayor Ups the Ante on Eminent Domain" The New York Sun (5/3/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "Companies and their leaders can establish formal codes of behavior but if they are not reinforced by strong ethical climates, the organizations can be vulnerable to various kinds of wrongdoing, according to a recent study by a graduate student and a psychology professor at the City University of New York’s Baruch College. Nicole Andreoli and Dr. Joel Lefkowitz looked at some of the conditions which lead to corporate misconduct and found that the ethical climate or culture of an organization, more than corporate practices or individual morality, are key indicators of whether a company is headed for problems. A classic example is at Enron where an elaborate code of ethics existed, but the values and actions of management conveyed a different picture. “Even good employees can get caught up in unethical behavior if they see it going on around them, or if managers don’t talk about ethical behavior as a company value,” he (Lefkowitz) said."
    "Leadership, Not Codes, Are True Test of a Company's Ethics"   Newswise (5/3/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    SPA Prof. Doug Muzzio commented on the recent dinner Mayor Bloomberg hosted for 51 City Council Members at Gracie Mansion; at last year's event, half the guests walked out during the salad course when Bloomberg made a politcal faux pas. "There's no reason for the mayor to be intentionally or unintentionally confrontational," said Doug Muzzio, a professor of public affairs at Baruch College in Manhattan. "This is a different mayor; he's more savvy. He understands the game better."
    "At Gracie Mansion, a cozy dinner for 52" The Staten Island Advance (5/3/06)

  • Baruch College News
    Law Professor Allan Wernick, whose immigration law column appears every Thursday in the Daily News, recently spearheaded Citizenship Now! a week-long joint effort of CUNY and the New York Daily News to answer readers immigration and citizenship questions. "People want to know what's going on in Washington, what the law migt look like, said Wernick who is heading the call-in program." Martha Burgos, an administrative assistant in Baruch's Early Learning Center, Ramonita Garcia, the designated official of Baruch's International Student Center, Hiram Lopez Nater, an attorney who is fluent in Spanish and practices law in New York and New Jersey, and is also an adjunct for the SEEK program at Baruch College, and Jeanne Pearson-Gray, a SEEK counselor at Baruch joined many other volunteers in the community service program.
    "Phones red-hot for immig news"  Daily News (5/2/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    Management Prof. Edward Rogoff was quoted in an article examining the urban grassroots advertising strategies of two entrepreneurs. "Helping firms penetrate the urban markets is a ``great approach,'' says Edward Rogoff, the director of Baruch College's Center for Entrepreneurship."These are big markets with sizable disposable incomes.''
    "2 firms tap founders' urban roots; Use their street cred to help U.S. Army, MTV, others reach inner-city audience" Crain's New York Business (5/1/06)


  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "Edward Rogoff, an assistant professor of management and the academic director for the Field Center for Entrepreneurship and Small Business at Baruch College
    in Manhattan, suggested that ''things related to interface with customers are best handled in house -- you don't want to lose control of that relationship.'' In that category, he puts taking orders and handling service requests. ''A good rule of thumb is to start with outsourcing most functions, to keep your fixed costs as low as possible until you're confident you're not going to run out of cash,'' Mr. Rogoff said. Only when a company is big enough to be sure an in-house employee will have enough work should it consider tackling such tasks, he said."
    "Should you or shouldn't you? (Outsource)" The New York Times (5/1/06)

  • Baruch College News
    "Though based in San Francisco, the Alexander Quartet has been presenting a short residency each semester at Baruch College for 20 years. With all respect to the Emerson String Quartet, I must say that it was particularly exciting to hear the first six of Shostakovich's elusive and
    remarkable string quartets played in the first two programs of the Alexander's series at Baruch. The Alexander has the enormous advantage of playing in an ideally intimate hall that seats just 174. This modern auditorium doubles as a lecture hall, so there are elevated rows of ergonomic seats with ample leg room. But the smallness of the space and its vibrant acoustics are the selling points."
    "Two Servings of the Same Shostakovich on the City's Musical Menu" The New York Times (4/29/06)


  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    Zicklin Prof. Edward Rogoff's first of five articles in a series called "Entreprenerial Conversations" appeared in The Syracuse Business Journal. "Let's face it: business is a team sport. Success comes from collaborating with colleagues, managing co-workers, forging partnerships, and recruiting and serving clients. I believe that the core force that drives each and every one of these business activities is a conversation between people. When these conversations are done right, the participants reveal their needs, hopes, capabilities, and personalities - and they establish the means of working together for their mutual benefit. I call these effective business discussions enterpreneurial conversations."
    "Entrepreneurial conversations are key to business success" The Syracuse Business Journal (4/28/06)

  • Baruch College News
    "Bharath Govindrajan, a first-year student in Master of Science in Applied Mathematics for Finance program in Baruch College, City University of New York, has won second place in the prestigious Interactive CollegiateTrading Olympiad,beating studets froma number of Ivy League institutions. "Baruch was my first choice for graduate study due to the applied nature of the program and the excellent faculty. The skills and theories I learned in  my MS in financial math classes aided the development of my trading strategy."
    "Baruch student places second in Olympiad" India Abroad (4/28/06); India Times (5/12/06)

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Baruch in the Media - Archive - April 2006

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    SPA Prof. Doug Muzzio commented on Mayor Bloomberg’s recent remarks about abortion rights legislation in the upcoming fall election. "It could be read as both an implicit criticism and a warning," a professor of public policy at Baruch College, Douglas Muzzio, said. "This is what he thinks, and he's speaking his mind regardless of his national ambitions."
    “Mayor Takes Hard Line on Abortion” The New York Sun (4/28/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    June O'Neill, the Wollman Professor of Economics and director of the Center for the Study of Business and Government at Baruch, who served as the director of the U.S. Congressional Budget Office from 1995 to 1999, was profiled by her alma mater The Bronx High School of Science. "The CBO is a very important office," she says, "because any bill coming out of committee in Congress must be 'scored' by CBO, meaning that CBO provides the offical estimate of the bill's expected cost to the federal budget. The office also provides the economic forecast for Congress and other economic and budget analyses needed by members of Congress."
    "From New York to Washington and Back with Economist June Ellenoff O'Neill '51" The Bronx High School of Science Alumni News (4/27/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    Accountancy professor Doug Carmichael was interviewed and quoted in this month's issue of CPA Journal. Read both pieces: "Transition in the Office of the Chief Auditor of the PCAOB" and "Automating the Audit Confirmation Process" CPA Journal (April 2006)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    SPA Prof. Doug Muzzio commented in an article detailing the meeting of 15 U.S. mayors at Gracie Mansion to discuss gun crimes. "Douglas A. Muzzio, a professor of public affairs at Baruch College, said Mr. Bloomberg's power may be largely limited to moral suasion. "The mayor has two things working against him: one is the overwhelming power of the N.R.A. and two is the lack of a perception of a gun crisis," he said, referring to the National Rifle Association. "If gun violence were out of control in the cities as it was in the cowboy days of the late 80's and early 90's, he might have a better chance. That said, it might be good politics for the mayor to hold such a high-level meeting. It could crystallize the opinions of urban constituents who disproportionately suffer from gun violence."
    "Mayors discuss efforts on gun crimes" The New York Times (4/25/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    Law Professor Allan Wernick appeared on the FOX News Morning Show Sunday discussing how much harder it is to get legal immigration status today than it was 100 years ago. Prof. Wernick also appeared on FOX Network's The O'Reilly Factor in a segment entitled "Unresolved Problem: Immigration issue." View the interview here: "O'Reilly ignored own guest, asserting that "the cops know" Arizona immigration bill would provide "a good tool for law enforcement to have" www.mediamatters.or(4/21/06);
    FOX News Morning Show (4/23/06); The O'Reilly Factor (4/19/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    SPA Prof. Doug Muzzio commeted on the big and the small campaign donations Sen. Clinton receives. "It's not only a money-raising strategy, it's an organization-building strategy," said Doug Muzzio, a Baruch College political scientist. "Not your elites, but your electorate. "The money being invested in direct mail not only pays you in dollars over time, it pays in partisans." Clinton's $20 million war chest and national span also tell other would-be contestants for the White House they had better weigh their choices carefully."She's sending a message to the Mark Warners, the Evan Bayhs, that she's going to be extremely powerful," said Muzzio, referring to two Democrats often named as "anti-Hillarys."
    "Nonfamous also donate to Clinton" New York Daily News; AZ Central.com; The Bradenton Herald (4/23/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "For decades, hospitals have used purchasing brokers to negotiate
    lower prices on medical supplies, cutting costs by billions of
    dollars. At issue are the "group purchasing organizations"
    that hospitals created to negotiate volume discounts from
    suppliers. The GPOs typically charge manufacturers a 3 percent
    "administrative fee" to include their products in offerings to
    hospitals, but some charge as much as 18 percent, according to a
    report by the Government Accountability Office. Testifying before the Senate Judiciary Subcommittee on Antitrust, Competition Policy, and Consumer Rights in March, S. Prakash Sethi, professor of management at Baruch College in New York, said that the "modus operandi" of GPOs "has contributed to a misallocation of a very large portion of the revenue received from vendors in the form of fees."
    "Prick-proof needles? Not today" The National Journal (4/22/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    Assistant professor of English Nancy Yousef is one of 39 National Humanities Center Fellows for 2006-07
    ; she received an NEH Fellowship for her research project entitled: Intimacy: Sympathetic Endeavor in Ethics, Narrative, and Psychoanalysis. "Geoffrey Harpham, Director of the National Humanities Center, noted that these newly appointed Fellows, the Center's twenty-ninth class, would include the one thousandth Fellow admitted since the Center opened in 1978. "I look forward to welcoming these exciting individuals," he said; "they represent an astonishing range of humanistic learning, from antiquity to the present."
    "National Humanities Center Names Fellows for 2006-07" Ascribe Newswire (4/19/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    Dall Forsythe, a Distinguished Lecturer in Baruch College’s School of Public Affairs who teaches governmental and nonprofit financial management, was quoted in a recent article examining the similarities between a budget crisis the city experienced in 1961 and one that Puerto Rico is facing now. "Just like Puerto Rico, the crisis comes with millions in budgetary deficits since 1961, but just like here in New York City, everyone looked the other way and continued to manage the budget as if it would balance itself out or as if loans (against the budget) would never have consequences. "The investment bankers have earned much money in helping Puerto Rico, selling their bonds at a high profit with the credit so low," he added."
    "The crisis three decades ago is similar to our crisis today" Primera Hora (4/18/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "After three months of campaigning and a statewide television blitz, Nassau County Executive Thomas Suozzi trails Attorney General Eliot Spitzer in the NewYork governor's race by a whopping 72 to 11 percent, according to a new poll released yesterday. "Right now it seems to me that his only hope is somehow a Spitzer blow-up,"said Douglas Muzzio, a professor of public affairs at Baruch College."
    "Suozzi struggling to gain on Spitzer" Newsday (4/18/06)
  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "Before Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton can win re-election and possibly compete for the presidency in 2008, she may have to deal with the likes of Steve Greenfield and Jonathan Tasini — two left-of-center, anti-war Democrats who have announced bids to challenge the powerhouse incumbent in a Democratic primary this fall."Being attacked by the left is not exactly a bad thing right now," said Doug Muzzio, a political science professor at Baruch College in Manhattan."
    "Hillary Clinton could face primary challenge" The Journal-News (4/18/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    Governor Pataki's recent budget vetoes are being viewed by pundits as a last ditch attempt to regain his former label as a fiscal conservative and to retain some political clout in advance of his expected 2008 presidential bid; SPA's Prof. Doug Muzzio weighed in. "What does he get out of it? He ceases to be irrelevant," said Doug Muzzio, a political science professor at Baruch College in Manhattan. "There's chest thumping here. He's saying 'I'm not irrelevant.' He's in the news. He's dominating the agenda."
    "Pataki fights for political relevancy" Press & Sun-Bulletin (4/15/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    Prof. Ted Joyce, an instant media celebrity as a result of his study on the impact of parental notification laws on teen abortions in Texas, appeared on ABC-TV's 20/20 to dispute the theories of Steven Levitt and Stephen Dubner, authors of the best-seller Freakonomics.  Levitt and Dubner concluded, among other controversial assertions, that easily available abortions bore a direct relationship to the downswing in crime since the 1980s. “I can find a different story in the data which undermines that conclusion,” Joyce, a longtime critic of Levitt’s work, told 20/20 host John Stossel.
    ABC-TV 20/20 (4/14/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    SPA Prof. Doug Muzzio commented on Sen. Clinton’s recent fundraising efforts, which have led to speculation that she may make a presidential bid in 2008. “The $2 million-a-month fundraising pace gave her $19.7 million cash on hand at the end of March for her Senate re-election.  "It's mind-blowing. She is raising money at a presidential level," said Doug Muzzio, a professor at Baruch College in New York. The two main challengers to Clinton's bid for a second term each reported less than $500,000 as they vie for the Republican nomination.
    "Sen. Clinton raises cash like a pro" The Associated Press; Toronto Star (4/14/06)

  • Baruch College News
    A recent profile of public speaking classes at Baruch highlighted the college's innovative approach to helping students look, feel and sound confident. "Waldron, the Baruch president, said the college is looking to expand programs offered by the career center, which already videotapes students doing mock interviews and has alumni who provide feedback. The college offers a workshop on how to act during a business lunch, and Waldron said she is looking to start a golf club that practices off a Manhattan pier so that students can learn the executive’s pastime."
    "Professor Dale Carnegie" Inside Higher Ed (4/13/06)

  • Baruch College News
    Just in time for the end of tax season, Baruch College's VITA tax program received a mention in a profile about a similar program at Ithaca College. "Student volunteers at Baruch College, located in New York City, also prepare tax forms through VITA. Baruch’s program began in 1991 and has four VITA locations throughout the city, each staffed with students who speak the language of the neighborhood. The students provide assistance in English, Chinese, Spanish and Russian."
    "Students file taxes for low-income earners" The Ithacan (4/13/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "What's the rationale for dividing the roles of chairman and CEO? Studies show that, usually, doing so has no effect on the company's performance. In the United Kingdom, a study of UK companies in 2005 by Baruch College professor Jay Dahya concluded that "the separation of the combined CEO and [chair] position is not associated with any (statistically or economically significant) improvement in operating or stock price performance relative to benchmark companies."
    "Before You Split That CEO/Chair" Harvard Business Review (April 2006)

  • Baruch Alumni News
    Greta Gladney, an alumnus of Baruch College’s MBA program is one of the candidates for mayor of New Orleans. Gladney is a lifelong New Orleans resident, single mother of three children, and former aide to Louisiana Rep. Charmaine Marchand. Gladney’s platform includes initiating legal action against the Corps of Engineers over dredging she says undermined levees, challenging the legality of state takeover of public schools, selective admission and Algiers charter schools, as well as making the city's Office of Economic Development accountable to neighborhood merchants associations.
    "Post-Katrina frustration fuels many candidates; The bid for mayor's chair offers drama, laughs, some surprises" Times-Picayune (4/12/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    SPA Prof. Doug Muzzio interviewed Zicklin Prof. Allan Wernick, who is also the Chair of the CUNY Citizenship and Immigration Project and the Daily News' immigration columnist, for two consecutive segments of the CUNY TV program, City Talk. The topic was the immigration reform movement and the pending legislation. Part 1 airs Wed., 4/12, at 9:30 am, 4:30 pm, and 9:30 pm, then the following Sat. at 3:30 and Sun. at 11:00 a.m. Part 2 will air Wed., 4/19, 9:30 am, 4:30 pm, and 9:30 pm, then the following Sat. at 3:30 pm, and Sun. at 11:00 am.
    CUNY TV: City Talk
    (4/12/06)

  • Baruch Alumni News
    Baruch College alumnus Martin Shafiroff, who majored in finance, was profiled recently in the Leaders & Success section of Investor's Business Daily ."First, Shafiroff learned the art of listening. While in college, the Brooklyn native and son of a plumbing supply businessman became friends with Lester Plum, a professor at Baruch who interviewed chief executives of many large companies. By joining Plum on these visits, he learned about cash flow, debt structure, innovation and other key factors that make a company great. Armed with this knowledge, Shafiroff could shine in a sea of Wall Street salesmen. He learned to ask questions that showed his depth of knowledge in an industry, and listened keenly to the answers. "Dr. Plum would let the CEO speak and give him a lot of time. He didn't dominate the meeting," Shafiroff said in an IBD interview. This, Shafiroff says, helped him quickly gain people's trust."
    "Money whiz Martin Shafiroff" Investors Business Daily (4/11/06)

  • Baruch College News
    "(Mark Green) The Democratic candidate for attorney general was docked $250 by Baruch College yesterday after he used a wonkish policy forum at the school to launch political attacks against Democratic rival Andrew Cuomo. Baruch officials said Green's remarks violated strict anti-campaigning guidelines at the nonpartisan School of Public Affairs, which later decided to charge Green $250 for using a hall it typically offers candidates for free. "I would say that about 75% of [Green's speech] was straight policy, but the end of it was really inappropriate for this location," said Barbara Fife, director of external affairs at the school. "We don't want to be in a position of making a contribution to a campaign."
    "Green loses free speech for ignoring Baruch rule" The Daily News (4/11/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    University Distinguished Professor of Management S. Prakash Sethi commented on the debate over elimintating short-term corporate earnings guidance. "The president of the International Center for Corporate Accountability at Baruch College, Prakash Sethi, is skeptical. "Different shareholders have differen agendas," Mr. Sethi says. He also maintains that "big companies, like the oil companies, do invest billions of dollars that won't see any short-term return; otherwise, you wouldn't have a short term. No midsize company can work for the short term. "There is a misconception; firms don't invest for the short term. But some do postpone expenses and so on to smooth earnings. It isn't fraud."
    "Is It Time To Ban Earnings Guidance?" The New York Sun (4/11/06)

  • Baruch College News
    Baruch student Bharath Govindarajan won a second place prize that includes a donation of $25,000 to Baruch College for his entry in Interacive Brokers' first Collegiate Trading Olympiad. "Interactive Brokers Group, a worldwide leader in market making and broker-dealer services, is sponsoring the first IB Collegiate Trading Olympiad. This forum will allow the future leaders in technology to compete for industry recognition as well as prize money by creating and implementing real-time program trading applications. The Olympiad highlights the growing need for computer science and engineering students in the financial industry, and to draw attention to this need in academia generally and particularly among students who are making important career choices."
    Interactive Brokers Collegiate Trading Olympiad  (4/10/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    Weissman Professor of History Carol Berkin, commented on the recent abundance of historical biograpies. "By contrast, journalists are "not just writing for five or six other academics in the field" a professor of history at Baruch College and author of "First Generations: Women of Colonial America," Carol Berkin, said. Ms. Berkin also noted the widespread response by readers to the current wave of books by journalists set during a past time when "we wore the white hats," whereas Mr. Lehrman suggested a tendency of academics to "ignore or depreciate the political tradition of this country."
    "Writers Rediscover New York's Revolutionary Past" The New York Sun (4/10/06)

  • Baruch College News
    "Instead of fighting student cell phone use, some schools are embracing it. At Baruch College in New York City (one of 10 senior colleges of The City University of New York), CIO Arthur Downing is working with Rave Wireless to supply students with cell-phone-accessible applications for academic-oriented uses. Downing explains that although the school’s 15,000 students have good access to computers on campus, and wireless coverage is fairly pervasive, students wanted more. “They want to check things quickly,” he explains. “Rather than [adding more computer] labs and kiosks, we wanted an easier way to get our Web-based applications to them.” Read the article: "The Road to 24/7" Campus Technology (4/7/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    SPA Prof. Doug Muzzio commented on City Council speaker Quinn's first major policy speech responding to recent budget proposals while also calling for reform of the circuitous budget process itself. "A professor of public policy at Baruch College, Douglas Muzzio, praised Ms. Quinn's speech but said there was a limit to how much she could succeed in changing the budget procedure. "You're not going to fundamentally alter the relationship between the council and the mayor," Mr. Muzzio said."
    "Quinn Wants To Restore $338M In Cuts to Proposed City Budget" The New York Sun (4/7/06)

  • Baruch College News
    For the 9th time in the last 10 years, the part-time MBA program of Baruch College’s Zicklin School of Business has ranked in the top 25 in U.S. News & World Report’s Index of America’s Best Graduate Schools. This year Baruch’s part-time MBA program ranked 17th – placing it second among all MBA programs in New York City. Baruch College’s full-time MBA program is one of the top three New York City programs and, at 70th overall, is listed among the top full-time graduate business programs in the country. Baruch College’s part-time and full-time MBA programs are the only ranked public programs in New York State.
    America's Best Graduate Schools Index 2007 U.S. News & World Report
    (4/6/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    Dov Waxman, assistant professor of political science at Baruch College, is the author of the forthcoming book, The Pursuit of Peace and the Crisis of Israeli Identity: Defending / Defining the Nation (Palgrave Macmillan, September 2006). Read his take on the domestic challenges facing Israel as the Kadima party assumes control of the parliament: Kadima's balancing act as well as his commentary on a recent paper by Stephen Walt and John Mearsheimer concerning the influence of the Israel lobby on US foreign policy:The "Israel Lobby" - Finally a Balanced Review
    Open Democracy; The Globalist (4/5/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    SPA Prof. Neil Sullivan commented on the debate over where the Yankees' management is hoping to build the new stadium. "Where's he going to build?" asked Baruch College professor Neil Sullivan, author of The Diamond in the Bronx: Yankee Stadium and the Politics of New York. "I live in Yonkers, and there used to be talk the Yankees might come up to the Raceway, but the Raceway is now being loaded up with video lottery terminals," he said. "The old pipe dream was the Yankees would go over to the Meadowlands, but I think that wouldn't make business sense. When the Giants and the Jets went to the Meadowlands, they were still in the same market," Sullivan said. "Let's say you go to Yankee Stadium or Shea from Westchester or Long Island, you can still go on a Sunday afternoon to the Meadowlands. But those same people won't go to the Meadowlands on a Tuesday night - the Yankees would be leaving their market. If the Yankees leave, why wouldn't the league put another team in the city? Then not only would the Yankees lose their market but they'd have a new competitor. I don't think that makes any sense at all."
    "Where could the Yanks go?" Metro New York (3/30/06)

  • Baruch College News
    Baruch College is one of the nation’s best value undergraduate institutions according to The Princeton Review. The New York-based education services company features the college in the new 2007 edition of its book, America’s Best Value Colleges (Random House / Princeton Review). The guide profiles 150 colleges with excellent academics, generous financial aid packages and relatively low costs. It includes 103 public and 47 private colleges in 40 states. The Princeton Review chose the colleges for the book based on data the company obtained from administrators at 646 colleges, and its surveys of students attending them.
    America’s Best Value Colleges (Random House / Princeton Review) (3/28/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "The Newman Real Estate Institute certificate program provides the basic courses that are state mandated to be licensed as a salesperson, broker, appraisal trainee, residential appraiser, general appraiser, and most recently, home inspector. Barry Hersh sees these courses, especially the salesperson course as "opening ante in the game. The 45 hour salesperson pre-licensure course has been offered at Baruch for more than 50 years, and I think our instructor does it better than anybody- but today one must learn much, much more about real estate to succeed."
    "Hersh of the Newman Institute: Offering students real estate education that will enable them to succeed" NY Executive of the Month: New York Real Estate Journal (3/27/06)

  • Baruch College News
    The first quarter CFO Outlook Survey conducted by Financial Executives International and Baruch's Zicklin School of Business reveals that corporate America is showing sustained optimism in economic and company-specific growth. The survey’s index of economic optimism trended upwards for the second consecutive quarter, reaching 71.06 out of 100, while individual company optimism rose slightly to 78.12 percent, the highest level in almost two years. View full survey results here: CFO Outlook Survey.
    "CFOs sustain optimism" The Associated Press; San Jose Mercury News; The Register Guard; The News Journal; The Canadian Press; The Biloxi Sun Herald; Fort Wayne Journal-Gazette; Fort Worth Star-Telegram; Pittsburgh Post-Gazette; Bloomberg News; Pensions and Investments; Accountingweb.com; WebCPA (3/27/06)

  • Baruch College News
    The second Nonprofit Executive Outlook Survey conducted by Baruch College showed somewhat higher levels of optimism among chief executives at more than 100 human service agencies in New York City. But while 69% believed the City was generally headed in the right direction, a substantial portion of respondents indicated their view that conditions were worsening for several of the City’s most vulnerable groups including poor families (61%), immigrants (43%), young people (41%) and the elderly (40%). View full survey results here: Nonprofit Executive Outlook Survey
    "Conditions in NYC worsening for poor: survey" Crain's New York Business; Gotham Gazette; New York Nonprofit Press; Philanthrophy News Digest (3/27/06)

View complete Baruch in the Media archive

To submit additions to this list, or report problems, email: communications@baruch.cuny.edu.

 

 

Baruch in the Media - Archive - March 2006

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    SPA Prof. Neil Sullivan commented on the debate over where the Yankees' management is hoping to build the new stadium. "Where's he going to build?" asked Baruch College professor Neil Sullivan, author of The Diamond in the Bronx: Yankee Stadium and the Politics of New York. "I live in Yonkers, and there used to be talk the Yankees might come up to the Raceway, but the Raceway is now being loaded up with video lottery terminals," he said. "The old pipe dream was the Yankees would go over to the Meadowlands, but I think that wouldn't make business sense. When the Giants and the Jets went to the Meadowlands, they were still in the same market," Sullivan said. "Let's say you go to Yankee Stadium or Shea from Westchester or Long Island, you can still go on a Sunday afternoon to the Meadowlands. But those same people won't go to the Meadowlands on a Tuesday night - the Yankees would be leaving their market. If the Yankees leave, why wouldn't the league put another team in the city? Then not only would the Yankees lose their market but they'd have a new competitor. I don't think that makes any sense at all."
    "Where could the Yanks go?" Metro New York (3/30/06)

  • Baruch College News
    Baruch College is one of the nation’s best value undergraduate institutions according to The Princeton Review. The New York-based education services company features the college in the new 2007 edition of its book, America’s Best Value Colleges (Random House / Princeton Review). The guide profiles 150 colleges with excellent academics, generous financial aid packages and relatively low costs. It includes 103 public and 47 private colleges in 40 states. The Princeton Review chose the colleges for the book based on data the company obtained from administrators at 646 colleges, and its surveys of students attending them.
    America’s Best Value Colleges (Random House / Princeton Review) (3/28/06)

  • Baruch College News
    The first quarter CFO Outlook Survey conducted by Financial Executives International and Baruch's Zicklin School of Business reveals that corporate America is showing sustained optimism in economic and company-specific growth. The survey’s index of economic optimism trended upwards for the second consecutive quarter, reaching 71.06 out of 100, while individual company optimism rose slightly to 78.12 percent, the highest level in almost two years. View full survey results here: CFO Outlook Survey.
    "CFOs sustain optimism" Accountingweb.com, WebCPA (3/27/06)

  • Baruch College News
    The second Nonprofit Executive Outlook Survey conducted by Baruch College showed somewhat higher levels of optimism among chief executives at more than 100 human service agencies in New York City. But while 69% believed the City was generally headed in the right direction, a substantial portion of respondents indicated their view that conditions were worsening for several of the City’s most vulnerable groups including poor families (61%), immigrants (43%), young people (41%) and the elderly (40%). View full survey results here: Nonprofit Executive Outlook Survey
    "Condions in NYC worsening for poor: survey" Crain's New York Business, Gotham Gazette, New York Nonprofit Press, Philanthrophy News Digest (3/27/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    Zicklin's University Distinguished Professor of Management, S. Prakash Sethi, who is also president of the International Center for Corporate Accountability, was quoted in a USA Today artice on the hazardous conditions at a Mattel factory in Mexico that makes Barbie doll outfits. "The audits — by Mattel and Prakash Sethi,a business professor at Baruch College and founder of the International Center for Corporate Accountability — praise some plants but warn others to shape up or lose Mattel's business. "It's not empty rhetoric," Sethi says. "Vendors have a financial incentive to comply with Mattel's codes."
    "How Barbie is making business a little better" USA Today, Asbury Park Press (3/27/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    SPA Professor of History Clarence Taylor addressed high school students from New York and New Jersey at a civil rights forum sponsored by the Gilder Lehrman American History Institute held at West Morris Central High School in Morris, NJ. “In 1950 the U.S. Census confirmed 15 million African-Americans living in the United States. They made up 10 percent of the population, but before the Civil Rights movement, a historian told some Morris high school students, they were treated as if they were not people at all. Author and historian Clarence Taylor, a professor at Baruch College in New York City, enlightened students March 23 at West Morris Central High School in Washington Township."Even though the Civil Rights movement has come and gone, the objectives are still with us," Taylor said.”
    ”Memories of a movement” Daily Record (3/23/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    Henry Wollman, director of Baruch's Newman Real Estate Institute
    , appeared on the front page of The New York Sun, commenting in their article on the interminable delays and political machinations affecting the re-development of the former World Trade Center site."The director of the Newman Real Estate Institute at Baruch College, Henry Wollman, said: "The state is in the middle of these issues in a formidable way. Someone as smart as Larry Silverstein may feel that he may do better with a new administration," Mr. Wollman said. "It would not surprise me if there were a strategy in the back of his mind."
    "Silverstein places big bet on Spitzer over Ground Zero" The New York Sun (3/21/06)

  • Baruch College News
    The Russian spring is upon us as an article in The New York Sun pointed out, mentioning Baruch's very own Russian Festival along with other Russian-themed art events taking place in the city over the next few months. "The Russian Festival at Baruch College, now through April 29, was partly an attempt to connect with the school's large population of Russian students, as well as a desire to commemorate Shostakovich, according to Baruch's director of theater arts, Cathleen Eads. "I think the centennial for Shostakovich has sparked a Russia resurgence," Ms. Eads said. "It just gives people a great excuse to bring out that great Russian music - it's so moving and stirring. The centennial reminds us of the treasure trove of great art that comes out of that country. Baruch's festival features a series of films with soundtracks composed by Shostakovich and performances of his string quartets. It extends to readings of Russian poetry, two Chekhov plays, and a panel discussion with experts on Russian art and music. There also will be an exhibit of post-Soviet art through April 26 at the Baruch Performing Arts Center."
    "A season rich with Russian arts" The New York Sun (3/17/06)


  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    Political science Prof. Doug Muzzio
    weighed in on Mayor Bloomberg's recent staff changes. “My concern is that the Mayor has lost people who really understood how to get things done, on the ground and underground,” said Doug Muzzio, a political scientist at Baruch College. “The new team ran a great campaign; there are very talented people there. But still, I wonder if they can deliver on his expansive promises—if City Hall can deliver with the personnel they have.”
    "In second term, Bloomberg team going to bench" New York Observer (3/14/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    SPA's Prof. Doug Muzzio
    commented on gubernatorial hopeful Tom Suozzi's early media ad blitz. "While it's unusual for candidates to go on the statewide airwaves so early, Baruch College political science Prof. Doug Muzzio said Suozzi's choice to run ads now makes sense because he needs voters to get to know him now. "The ad not only shows he is running a throw-the-bums out campaign, but it's also telling voters that Tom Suozzi has already done it in Nassau County," Muzzio said.
    "Dems open air wars. Gov-race ads start early" Daily News (3/14/06)

  • Baruch College News
    The recent appointment of Carol Abrams as Baruch's chief communications officer was mentioned in the Ins and Outs section of CityLimits.org. "In other press news, Carol Abrams, former assistant commissioner for communications at the New York City Department of Housing Preservation and Development was named chief communications officer at City University of New York/Baruch College."
    "The City's Latest Hirings, Firings, and Retirings" www.CityLimits.org (3/13/06)

  • Baruch College News
    Baruch has named Mark Kurlansky as the spring 2007 Sidney Harman Writer-In-Residence. Kurlansky is the author of several books on topics that range from food to ethnography, most recently, The Big Oyster. "The Big Oyster, just completed by Kurlansky and published by Ballantine, is receiving acclaim both by critics and popular opinion. The new book was featured on the cover of the March 5 New York Times Book Review with an article entitled, “The Mollusk That Made Manhattan.” NYT critic Elizabeth Royte said, “The Big Oyster proves that it is possible for a skilled researcher to tell the history of New York—its wealth, excitement, greed, destructiveness and filth—through the history of a single creature.”
    "The Big Oyster comes to Baruch" The Ticker (3/13/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    The New England Journal of Medicine published a study by Zicklin economics professor Ted Joyce, among others, which found, "The Texas parental notification law was associated with a decline in abortion rates among minors from 15 to 17 years of age. It was also associated with increased birth rates and rates of abortion during the second trimester among a subgroup of minors who were 17.50 to 17.74 years of age at the time of conception." The results of this study were widely cited by numerous major, national, media outlets.
    "Changes in Abortions and Births and the Texas Parental Notification Law" New England Journal of Medicine (3/9/06), ABC's "World News Tonight," The New York Times, Dallas Morning News, Houston Chronicle, Forbes, Washington Post, The Associated Press, Reuters, Akron Beacon Journal, Belleville News-Democrat, Charleston Gazette, Fort Wayne Journal Gazette, The Miami Herald, St. Paul Pioneer Press, Elites TV, Washington Times, The Commercial Appeal, St. Petersburg Times, Star Tribune, The Baltimore Sun, The Richmond Times Dispatch, Facts on File World News Digest, Austin-American Statesman, www.townhall.com www.Kaisernetwork.org, www.LifeSite.net, CNN.com (3/9/06)
  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    SPA Prof. Doug Muzzio
    commented on an incendiary speech Hillary Clinton made calling immigrant deportation legislation proposed by Republican lawmakers an omen of a police state. Doug Muzzio, a Baruch College political science professor, said Clinton's attacks "stimulate the Democratic base and [also generate] media coverage." "I'm not buying that this is an angry woman thing," Muzzio said. "She has made the strategic calculation that she needs to talk to her base."
    "GOP immig bill would mean police state: Hil" Daily News (3/9/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    SPA's Interim Dean Prof. David Birdsell
    commented on the negative repercussions of the Dubai ports deal for George Bush's GOP support base. "This is the biggest revolt Bush has faced and it comes on the issue that has been the core and heart of his presidency, namely security," said David Birdsell, a political scientist with Baruch College in New York City."
    "Ports deal sparks biggest party revolt vs. Bush" Reuters (3/8/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    Zicklin's Saxe Distinguished Prof. of Finance, Terrence Martell
    was quoted in Leonore Skenazy's column about the perils of a global workforce. "While the U.S. can still create plenty of jobs, the unskilled ones won't pay much. And so, concludes Terrence Martell, director of the Weissman Center of International Business at Baruch College: "Make sure you and your children have an adequate educational background, because that's what you'll need to compete."
    "Who's afraid of a little rivalry?" Daily News (3/8/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    SPA's Interim Dean Prof. David Birdsell
    commented on Mayor Bloomberg's recent championing of eminent domain. “It’s not necessarily the case that the fact that a private interests developing property means that there is no public value. The question is adequate compensation and adequate process for the people who are dispossessed,” said David Birdsell of Baruch College. “And those are very, very difficult questions to try to guarantee in a very fraught environment.”
    "Mayor takes on the fight over eminent domain" NY1 News (3/8/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    SPA's Doug Muzzio
    commented on how Hillary Clinton makes outrage work for her. "She's the Mount Everest of Democrats," said Baruch College politics Prof. Doug Muzzio. "Maybe the Republicans' fervent dream that she'll be the Democratic nominee will turn out to be their nightmare."
    "Turns out Hillary's all the rage" Daily News (3/8/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    Zicklin economics professor Ted Joyce commented on parental notification laws and their impact on teen births and abortion rates in a New York Times article. "There are ongoing trends that are pushing both birth rates and abortion rates down significantly, and those larger trends are more important than the effect of these laws,'' said Ted Joyce, an economist at Baruch College in NewYork who has studied parental involvement laws. He found they had limited effects on small subgroups of minors but little impact over all. Of the remaining decline in teenage abortion rates in the Times study, Dr. Joyce said that some of it might be attributed to minors going out of state for abortions."
    "Scant Drop Seen in Abortions if Parents Are Told" The New York Times (3/6/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    Accountancy professor Doug Carmichael commented on the Enron trial on CNN's People in the News segment. "Prof. Doug Carmichael, Baruch College, "Someone with some understanding of business should be able to pick up the financial statements, read the notes and understand the full effects."
    "People in the News" CNN (3/5/06)

  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    "Chairman Millstein Announces New Public Authority Board Member Training Program NYS Commission on Public Authority Reform and CUNY Joint Program To Launch March 24." This training, conducted by the CUNY School of Professional Studies, was developed by some of the most respected faculty members from Baruch College and City College in collaboration with internationally recognized governance expert Ira M. Millstein," said CUNY Chancellor Matthew Goldstein. "We are pleased to be able to offer this training to all public authorities." View full text of press release on CUNY's School of Professional Studies' Public Authority Training Programs Web page. (3/3/06)


  • Baruch College News
    Baruch's Newman Real Estate Institute hosted a day-long look at Harlem's development and the demographic and population shifts that accompany economic renewal, featuring real estate leaders, investors and community activists including Congressman Charles B. Rangel, Dr. Calvin O. Butts, C. Virginia Fields, as speakers. "The idea of the all-day symposium, "Harlem in Our Eyes," was to explore the "intersection of new development with the existing community," with a few new developers up on the podium and representatives of the community participating from the audience. The intersection wasn't always friendly. Indeed, the morning sessions at the conference - hosted by Baruch College's Steven L. Newman Real Estate Institute - aired many complaints from self-described artists, activists, and small retailers arguing that rejuvenation had wiped out Harlem's cultural integrity."
    "First Fully Market-Rate Apartments Come to Harlem" New York Sun (3/2/06)


  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    Zicklin's Emanuel Saxe Distinguished Professor of Accounting, Abe Briloff, was the subject of a recent article in the Journal of American Academy of Business. "Abraham Briloff, an accounting academician and practitioner for over 60 years, is a major historical voice for the tenets of Section 201, of Title II, entitled Auditor Independence, of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (SOX). Section 201 is entitled Services outside the scope of practice of auditors and makes it certain practices unlawful for a public accounting firm when conducting an audit. SOX came into effect subsequent to the wave of accounting scandals in 2002. In his 1965 doctoral dissertation, The Effectiveness of Accounting Communication, and in numerous published writings, Mr. Briloff had indicated his opposition to these practices. Finally, in 2002, these practices were outlawed. This article examines Mr. Briloff s longstanding claims and suggestions and points out how they were finally resolved by Section 201. From these it is apparent that Mr. Briloff foresaw the need for the content of Section 201 of SOX."
    "A Voice Crying in the Wilderness for Auditor Independence: Abe Briloff and Section 201 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002" Journal of American Academy of Business (Cambridge) (3/2/06)


  • Baruch Faculty Expertise
    Zicklin marketing professor Yoshi Tsurumi participated in a Forbes video roundtable discussion on Japanese trade; watch the videos: New Dawn for Japan and Reform in the Wings
    (3/2/06)


  • Baruch Alumni News
    "Daniel Brody, a 1999 Baruch MBA-Mt. Sinai graduate and a 1996 graduate of Yeshiva college, will appear as a contestant on the immensely popular series "The Apprentice" on NBC-TV, starting Monday, Feb. 27. A natural entrepreneur, Mr. Brody returned to campus when he took over ownership of a neighborhood fixture, Grandma's Cookie Jar, from 1999-2002. He is founder of Brody Sport, a designer brand of activewear, and holds multiple patents for unusual gadgets he invented. While an undergraduate he worked at a home for mentally and physically challenged adults. After graduating, Mr. Brody earned an MBA from Baruch College while working full-time at Marriott International where he rose to Property Controller within a few short years. Nearly 600,000 people apply to be contestants on "The Apprentice" and Mr. Brody is looking forward to working with Mr. Trump. To follow Daniel's progress on the program, log on to his Web site, www.danielbrody.com."
    "Bio" www.danielbrody.com (2/22/06)

View complete Baruch in the Media archive

To submit additions to this list, or report problems, email: communications@baruch.cuny.edu.

 

Baruch in the Media - Archive - February 2006

  • SPA Prof. Doug Muzzio weighed in on the politics behind the sentencing of the men responsible for the murders at a Wendy's in Queens in May 2000. ''The governor seems to tack with prevailing winds,'' said Douglas Muzzio, a professor of political science at Baruch College. ''It's part of the lethargy of the governor. He gets elected on this issue and then in a sense moves on, given that the political winds have changed on the death penalty.''
    "Legal Struggle Over a Death Row Case May Decide More Than an Inmate's Fate" The New York Times (2/26/06)

  • Terrence Martell, Zicklin's SaxeDistinguished Profesor of finance was commented on Mayor Bloomberg's stance in the Dubai ports deal. "Terrence Martell, director of the Weissman Center of International Business at Baruch College, said it makes sense that the mayor is attempting to strike this "exact balance" with the port deal. "It's smart," Martell said. "It's a wise course of action to acknowledge that
    security issues must be addressed and satisfied, but this is a city that lives
    on world trade."
    "Mayor, passionate about business, straddles line in port dispute" The Associated Press (2/25/06)

  • Baruch sociology professor Barbara Katz Rothman commented on a Baylor College of Medicine study in which parents would be allowed to select the sex of their child before it was implanted in the uterus, but can only select the sex of a child they do not already have, a girl if they have a boy and vice versa. “The Baylor study may tell us something about the short-term consequences for the sex-selected children and their families. If the news it produces is good and the children and their families probably will be fine for the most part what then? Maybe after 40 years of research we will be able to see if larger-scale social changes have taken place, but by then the changes will have
    altered society. We won't have the research to see the big picture until we're living in it.”
    “The consequences of sex selection” The Chronicle of Higher Education (2/24/06)
  • "Daniel Brody, a 1999 Baruch MBA-Mt. Sinai graduate and a 1996 graduate of Yeshiva college, will appear as a contestant on the immensely popular series "The Apprentice" on NBC-TV, starting Monday, Feb. 27. A natural entrepreneur, Mr. Brody returned to campus when he took over ownership of a neighborhood fixture, Grandma's Cookie Jar, from 1999-2002. He is founder of Brody Sport, a designer brand of activewear, and holds multiple patents for unusual gadgets he invented. While an undergraduate he worked at a home for mentally and physically challenged adults. After graduating, Mr. Brody earned an MBA from Baruch College while working full-time at Marriott International where he rose to Property Controller within a few short years. Nearly 600,000 people apply to be contestants on "The Apprentice" and Mr. Brody is looking forward to working with Mr. Trump. To follow Daniel's progress on the program, log on to his Web site, www.danielbrody.com."
    "Bio" www.danielbrody.com (2/22/06)

  • SPA Prof. Doug Muzzio commented on City Council Speaker Christine Quinn's recent cooperation with Mayor Blomberg. "A professor of public affairs at Baruch College, Douglas Muzzio, said Ms. Quinn seems to be "moving toward a more conversational, less confrontational" approach. "She's got core beliefs, and she obviously feels that working with the mayor is a better way to achieve things than working against him," Mr. Muzzio said."
    "Speaker and mayor stand together" The New York Sun (2/22/06)

  • SPA Prof. Shoshanna Sofaer commented on the practice of physician report cards. “Shoshanna Sofaer, a professor at Baruch College of City University of New York, is working with Massachusetts Health Quality Partners on a survey of patient experience with different doctors’ offices, due out next month. The partnership’s ratings of doctors’ clinical performance issued Feb. 8 used much larger physician groups. “Getting information about a medical group as a whole is not the same thing as getting information on an individual physician,” Sofaer acknowledged. But she said measures of groups as a whole are still relevant for patients because the measures speak to group-wide practices that can be relevant to all patients.”
    “What’s up with your doc?; Report cards designed to narrow choices; the kind of information you can get your hands on”
    The Patriot Ledger (2/18/06)

  • John Brenkman, Distinguished Professor of English and director of the U.S.-Europe Seminar, comments on the Cheney hunting accident in the Chicago Tribune:
    “Lessons on hunting and truth-telling” Chicago Tribune (2/17/06)

  • SPA Professor Robert Smith, who studies Mexican immigrants in New York, was  a guest on WNYC’s Brian Lehrer Show discussing his recent book, Mexican New York: Transnational Lives of New Immigrants (University of California Press, 2005). Smith describes the phenomenon of “transnationalism,” whereby immigrants essentially live in two cultures, keeping up family and community ties in their Mexican hometown while simultaneously carving out a new life in New York City.
    “Mexico in Nueva York” The Brian Lehrer Show, WNYC (2/16/06)

  • The Queens Tribune profiled Baruch alumnus Gina Cheung, model, entrpreneur and motorcyclist. "Gina has been modeling since 2004. One of her most cherished experiences was appearing in a November 2005 issue of the popular women's magazine, "Marie Claire." After earning a business degree from Baruch College, Gina showed her entrepreneurial side with a unique business idea: starting a clothing line for dogs."
    "Q Confidential: Biker babe"
    Queens Tribune (2/16/06)

  • SPA Prof. Doug Muzzio commented on the resounding silence following Dick Cheney's hunting accident. "Douglas Muzzio, a public-affairs professor at Baruch College, said he would advise Cheney to come clean by commenting publicly on the controversy. But Muzzio is not holding his breath expecting him to. "Politically, he has to in some way explain [his actions] because to not do so would be perceived as to be disdainful to the American people," Muzzio said.But while most people would agree to appear in public to explain, "There's almost an essential part of [Cheney's] character that might refuse to do it," he added.
    "Open season on Silent Dick after his victim has a heart attack" New York Post (2/15/06)

  • SPA Prof. Doug Muzzio commented on Jeanine Pirro's penchant for firearms. "By cozying up to a pro-gun crowd, Pirro may have helped her immediatepolitical goals," said Baruch College professor Doug Muzzio. "Conservatives love pistol-packin' mamas," Muzzio said. "Given that her record as being pro-choice is not to their liking, this is something they would like to hear."
    "Pistol-packin' Pirro. AG Candidate shootsfrom hip to win pro-gun lobby" Daily News (2/14/06)

  • "Forbes.com editor Paul Maidment digs into the Enron trial with Gregory Markel, chairman, Litigation Department, Cadwalader, Wickersham & Taft; Doug Carmichael, professor, CUNY Zicklin School of Business; Jill Fisch, professor, Fordham University School of Law."
    "Enron Trial Scandal" Forbes.com

     

  • For the first time Baruch was included in Kaplan/Newsweek’s 2006 edition of America’s Hottest Colleges, ranked as one of the nation's most interesting schools. “There are may things that can make a school interesting – be it academic strengths, student body, or specialty programs.”
    “America’s Hottest Colleges 2006” Kaplan/Newsweek (2/14/06)

  • Just in time for Valentine's Day, two Baruch psychology professors' research on who says 'I love you' to whom and how often, received some media attention. "The research was conducted by psychologists Richard Wilkins and Elisabeth Gareis, from Baruch College in New York. They wrote in the International Journal of Intercultural Relations: "Respondents indicated that frequent use of verbal declarations of love was common in relationships of lovers and across parents and grandparents to their children and grandchildren, while declarations of love overall were rarely if ever used across work/professional, neighbours, siblings, cousins and grandchildren to their grandparents."
    "Who most loes using those three little words" Press Association Newsfile (2/14/06)

  • Law professor Seth Lipner commented on the lawsuit involving L'Oreal products being sold on the 'gray market.' "These are important cases "100 percent concerning whether a consumer can buy a [desirable] product at a corner drugstore or only in a fancy salon," said an expert on marketing laws, Seth Lipner, a professor at Baruch College in Manhattan, who also practices law in Garden City."
    "L'Oreal disputes a second company formed by Quality King Distributors to sell its upscale lines; In a lather over shampoo" Newsday (2/14/06)

  • SPA’s Prof. Doug Muzzio commented on City Council Speaker Christine Quinn’s recent reform tactics. “Douglas A. Muzzio, a professor of public policy at Baruch College, said Ms. Quinn's earlier politicking did not necessarily rule out her efforts now to make substantive changes. "Those were the rules of the game that she was confronted with, and since she wanted to be speaker, she played by them," he said.”
    “Playing the game, then seeking to change it” The New York Times (2/13/06)

     

  • “The wheels of political advancement for Councilman Joe Addabbo could be greased by the clout and campaign dollars of Mayor Michael Bloomberg, if the Howard Beach Democrat decides to vie for a seat in Albany. I think he (Mayor Bloomberg) believes a Democratic Senate might be in the city’s interest,” said Doug Muzzio, professor of public policy at Baruch College.”
    “Mayor takes on state GOP, courts Addabbo for Senate” Queens Chronicle (2/9/06)

  • The United Way of New York City has spent $456,000 over the last two years to create and help pay tuition for two new fellowship programs at Baruch College. The fellowships provide training to potential nonprofit leaders who are identified by executive directors of New York charities. The first, aimed at people who are three to five years into a nonprofit career, provides 30 hours of training to 50 students each year. The second, tailored to nonprofit employees with five to seven years of experience, provides graduate-level courses in nonprofit management to up to 25 people annually. To date, 107 students have graduated from the training programs.”
    “New efforts underway to recruit the next generation of charity” The Chronicle of Philanthropy (2/8/06)

  • Weissman’s professor of Middle East history Jed Abrahamian was quoted in UPI’s analysis the role that the People’s Mujahedeen, viewed as a terrorist organization by the US and Europe, could potentially play in the nuclear standoff with Iran. “But critics like Ervand Abrahamian, author of a 1989 book on the Mujahedeen, says that is its standard response to damaging allegations. "It would be a sign of desperation if Washington resorted to the Mujahedeen as an instrument against the Iranian regime," added Abrahamian, a Middle East history professor at Baruch College, in New York. "I can't imagine anyone more discredited in Iran than the Mujahedeen."
    “Opposition a stick against Tehran?” United Press International (2/8/06)

  • “A new Web site under development will help high school and college students learn more about investment strategies and money management. The Young Investor Online Guide is sponsored by the NASD Investor Education Foundation and will be developed by the City University of New York's Baruch College. "Young adults need to know more about their investment opportunities, especially in the early stages of their working lives," said Robert Glauber, chairmanof the NASD IEF. "This online tool will allow them to experiment with and manipulate key variables that predict long-term financial security in a simulated environment."
    “Financial Education Site”
    Education Technology News (2/8/06)

  • Zicklin professor of management, S. Prakash Sethi commented on political campaign contributions by the financial fund industry. “The increase in contributions doesn't surprise S. Prakash Sethi, president of the International Center of Corporate Accountability Inc. in New York and a professor at the Zicklin School of Business at Baruch College, also in New York. “All businesses have a very well-defined motive when it comes to why they make campaign contributions,'' he said. “That motive usually involves making sure their interests are met by lawmakers.'”
    “Political contributions by fund industry soar; politics, legislation and scandal sparked firms to seek influence” Investment News (2/6/06)

  • Mayor Bloomberg, something of a political switch hitter to begin with, is at it again. “That Mr. Bloomberg, a Republican, could support a bid to overturn the GOP's 35-26 majority in the state Senate is not surprising, a professor of public affairs at Baruch College, Douglas Muzzio, said. "The mayor prides himself in being a nonpartisan mayor, though Republican in name," Mr. Muzzio said.”
    “Mayor may back Democrats in pursuit of education funds” The New York Sun (2/6/05)

  • “Financial regulatory services provider NASD Investor Education Foundation has awarded a $240,829 grant to Baruch College-The City University of New York to develop Young Investor Online Guide, an interactive computer-based investment guide tailored to young adults making career choices. The project will enable users to test investment strategies and encourage young people to consider investment opportunities, say NASD spokespeople. The college will work with Kognito Solutions, an educational software developer, to produce the financial education tool.”
    “Smart investment planning” www.campus-technology.com (2/6/06)

  • Mayor Bloomberg’s philanthropy seems to be an open secret, despite half-hearted efforts to keep it under wraps. "Total anonymity is not in the mayor's best interest, and so you have this game of the known anonymous giver," said Douglas Muzzio, professor of public affairs at Baruch College. "But who can blame him: He's giving $100 million, so he wants a little credit, but he doesn't want to be seen as trumpeting his giving."
    “NYC mayor's gifts rarely stay anonymous”
    The Associated Press (2/3/06)

  • Benefits are major battle points in upcoming contract negotiations for civil service jobs, according to Mayor Bloomberg’s recent State of the City speech. SPA Prof. Doug Muzzio weighed in. "You can have a period of really heated negotiations," said Baruch College political science Prof. Doug Muzzio. "These issues are at the heart of what unions need to protect and at the heart of what the mayor needs to reform."
    “Pensions and pacts” New York Daily News (2/1/06)



                   Baruch in the Media - Archive - January 2006

  • Multichannel News, a publication of Reed Business Information profiled Baruch alumnus Shari Brill, who is vice president and director of programming for the ad agency Carat USA Inc. "Brill, who holds a degree in marketing and consumer behavior from Bernard M. Baruch College, thinks she has a pretty good handle on why some programs become water-cooler hits, from FX's Rescue Me to HBO's The Sopranos to ABC's Lost. The characters in such shows share similar traits. "What makes them interesting is that they're multilayered, they're three-dimensional, and they're flawed," Brill says. "That's going on with all of those shows: learning about what makes those characters tick and how they grow and come to terms with different situations"
    "Television Translator; Carat's Shari Anne Brill Dissects What Makes Characters Tick and Shows Succeed" Multichannel News (1/30/06)

  • The New York Post chronicled Mayor Bloomberg’s recent transformation into a political tough guy, prompting SPA Prof. Doug Muzzio to comment. "He gave us a laundry list of his greatest hits," Baruch College professor Doug Muzzio said, "but there's a lot of good stuff on that list."
    “Landslide Bloomy now Mr. Tough Guy” The New York Post (1/27/06)

     

  • SPA Prof. Doug Muzzio commented on gubernatorial candidate Eliot Spitzer’s similarity to Mayor Giuliani, although he found him lacking in other areas. "Actually, I think Rudy has more charm than Eliot," said Doug Muzzio, the tart-tongued political scientist from Baruch College.  This is what is known in politics as faint praise. Which self-righteous prosecutor-type with his eye on higher office would you prefer to hang with?  "I'd rather go to dinner with Rudy, wouldn't you?" Muzzio said. "Rudy has more personality."
    “Spitzer looks like Rudy redux” New York Newsday (1/25/06)

  • Associate Professor of Real Estate Barry Hersh commented on Nassau County Executive Thomas Suozzi’s endorsement of providing state incentives for the development of abandoned industrial sites. "The big challenge is you got started and the costs turned out to be more than you thought, and it's a black hole from which you never emerge," an associate professor of real estate at Baruch College, Barry Hersh, said. "You need clarity."
    “Suozzi says he favors incentives to develop contaminated land” The New York Sun (1/25/06)

  • SPA Prof. Doug Muzzio commented on Mayor Bloomberg’s propensity for not making political enemies. "He believes there are no permanent enemies," a professor of public affairs at Baruch College, Douglas Muzzio, said. "There may be opponents on specific issues, but there are no enemies."  The approach, Mr. Muzzio said, serves the city well because it doesn't penalize players from partaking in public policy debates simply because they didn't support the mayor politically.”
    “Since re-election, mayor mends ties with old foes” The New York Sun (1/25/06)

  • DA Eliot Spitzer’s choice of State Senate minority leader David Patterson,  who is African-American, as lieutenant governor in his gubernatorial campaign spurred SPA’s Prof. Doug Muzzio to comment. "This is your classic ethnic politics," said Douglas Muzzio, a Baruch College political science professor. "Plus, he's an institutional player, so he brings knowledge and cache with him as well as a legislative constituency."
    “Spitzer chooses running mate” The Times Union (NY) (1/24/06)

  • Prof. Jed Abrahamian commented in an article on the role of the People’s Mujahedeen in the ongoing dispute over Iran’s nuclear capabilities. “But critics like Ervand Abrahamian doubt this claim. Abrahamian is a professor of Middle East History at Baruch College in New York, and an expert on the People's Mujahedeen. He says the group and its founder, Massoud Rajavi, had a lot of support during the Iranian revolution, when they briefly collaborated with Ayatollah Khomeini to topple the Shah of Iran. But he says that is no longer true.  “My opinion basically is that they are a fringe group - very much around one personality, that's Massoud Rajavi," he explained. "And that they have lost most of their social support which they had, which was considerable social support between 1978 and 1981."
    “Iranian resistance group seen as leverage in nuclear dispute” Voice of America (1/23/06)

  • Westchester Assemblyman Richard Brodsky’s campaign for the attorney general seat is on the rocks, according to pundits. SPA’s Doug Muzzio weighed in. "You've got people in this race who have, in a sense, national fundraising networks out there," said Douglas Muzzio, a professor of public affairs at Baruch College in New York. "And Brodsky just can't match that."
    “Brodsky A.G. bid faltering” The Journal News (NY) (1/22/06)

  • SPA Prof. Doug Muzzio commented on the criticism heaped on TWU President Roger Toussaint in the wake of the pre-Christmas transit strike that led to his endorsement of the unpopular contract recently rejected by union members."The leader of the union has been symbolically deposed," said Baruch College public-affairs professor Doug Muzzio. "This is astounding. Toussaint has lost control of his union. He is in deep doo-doo. This is not a slap on the wrist. It's a punch in the face."
    “Punch in the face for Roger likely to flatten rank and file, too” The New York Post (1/21/06)

  • Newly elected City Council Speaker Christine Quinn continues to generate headlines on everything from the role she will play in setting the council’s agenda to what sort of relationship she will develop with Mayor Bloomberg. SPA’s Prof. Doug Muzzio weighed in on both topics.  "[The agenda] comes from outside as well as inside: the Mayor, other government officials and departments, external events such as changes in the economy and disasters of a sort," Douglas Muzzio, public affairs professor at Baruch College said.   "It will be an evolving relationship," Muzzio said. "All other things equal, it may be less contentious under Quinn [than under Miller] because she does not seem to have Mayoral ambitions."
    “New York City’s Council Speaker settles into new role” Columbia Daily Spectator (1/20/06)

  • SPA Prof. Doug Muzzio commented on the repercussions of the recent child abuse scandal at the Administration of Children’s Services following the death of seven year-old Nixzmary Brown for Mayor Bloomberg. "He has to walk a fine line," said Doug Muzzio, a political scientist at Baruch College. "He's got to substantively address concerns the case has raise in the public, and at the same time he has to protect the institution. He can't be too draconian and demoralize an entire agency. Remember, this is not just an A.C.S. problem. It's a school problem, a police problem. The web of responsibility here is enormous."
    “Abused child’s murder a crisis for Bloomberg” New York Observer (1/23/06)

  • The Associated Press’ financial wire mentioned the FEI/Zicklin School’s CFO survey in its coverage of corporate capital expenditures as economic savior. “More gains seem likely. More than two-thirds of nearly 300 chief financial officers expect to increase capital spending over the next year, with the average increase being 9 percent, according to a survey done by the CFO trade group Financial Executives International and Baruch College's Zicklin School of Business."
    “All Business: Economy counting on capital spending surge” The Associated Press (1/17/06)

  • Senator Clinton made a huge gaffe, or merely pointed out the emperor’s new clothes, depending on whom you ask, when she compared the current House of Representatives to a “plantation,” during a speech in Harlem on Martin Luther King Day. Pundits are debating whether the scathing remark will hurt her chances in the 2008 presidential race. SPA Prof. Doug Muzzio weighed in. “Baruch College Prof. Doug Muzzio agreed: "I don't think it hurts her. Legislative dictatorship isn't a partisan issue. People will understand the metaphor."
    “A blunder for Clinton?” New York Daily News (1/17/06); “Hillary Clinton says US House “Run like a plantation” by GOP” The Frontrunner (1/17/06)

  • The United Way of New York City has spent $456,000 over the last two years to create and help pay tuition for two new fellowship programs at Baruch College. The fellowships provide training to potential nonprofit leaders who are identified by executive directors of New York charities. The first, aimed at people who are three to five years into a nonprofit career, provides 30 hours of training to 50 students each year. The second, tailored to nonprofit employees with five to seven years of experience, provides graduate-level courses in nonprofit management to up to 25 people annually. To date, 107 students have graduated from the training programs.”
    “New efforts underway to recruit the next generation of charity” The Chronicle of Philanthropy (1/12/06)

  • Baruch alumnus Robert Weingarten was featured in The New York Times’ Arts & Leisure section for his innovative photography exhibit that brings a bit of sun to the seasonally snowbound Rochester. “Mr. Weingarten, a former executive who took up a camera professionally at 54, travels around the world in search of images, and his work is now in the collections of several major museums. But in 2002, at the urging of Weston Naef, the photography curator at the J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles, Mr. Weingarten decided to train his lens on his own backyard in Malibu, Calif., following Alfred Stieglitz's advice that photographers should first look for pictures at home before traveling to find them. The results of Mr. Weingarten's experiment went on view this week at Eastman House, beaming a little bit of Southern California to Rochester, at least photographically. His idea was to take pictures with a medium-format film camera every day that he was home, at exactly the same time, 6:30 in the morning, the camera pointed southeastward from his bedroom porch toward the same spot over Santa Monica Bay."
    “California dreaming on such a winter’s day” The New York Times (1/12/06)

  • Zicklin management Prof. S. Prakash Sethi was recognized in Jack O’Dwyer’s Newsletter as a member of the advisory board for the newly established ethics counseling practice at PR agency Ruder Finn that is headed by senior vice president Emmanuel Tchividjian.
    “Tchividjian is RF’s ‘Mr. Ethics’ ” Jack O’Dwyer’s Newsletter  (1/11/06)

  • DMNews, The Online Newspaper of Record for Direct Marketers, profiled Baruch Direct, Zicklin’s not-for-profit, intern-staffed, direct marketing agency. “Three years ago, Baruch's direct marketing curriculum consisted of one course in DM basics. Then adjunct marketing professor and DM consultant Harvey Markovitz wrote a proposal for a school center that would replicate a real-life agency as a way to provide students practical working experience. In 2005, Markovitz created paid internships with the goal of having the interns run the agency. "We took the theory in the classroom and put it into real play for clients," he said of Baruch Direct."
    “Students give theory a practical edge” DM News (1/10/06)

  • SPA Prof. Doug Muzzio was quoted in a story that ran on The Associated Press’s state and local wire about Mayor Bloomberg’s choice for deputy mayor: 32-year old former communications director Ed Skyler,  “Baruch College public affairs professor Douglas Muzzio said age is of no concern in the mayor's inner circle, where loyalty takes top priority. "He's got the ear and the respect of the mayor," Muzzio said of Skyler. "He's sort of an obvious pick."
    “New York mayor’s 32-year old spokesman promoted to deputy” The Associated Press (1/10/06)

  • The New York Sun quoted SPA Dean David Birdsell in an article on Mayor Bloomberg’s second term agenda. “A professor of public affairs at Baruch College, David Birdsell, said, "This is going to be his last term in elective office. Looking to establish a legacy, he needs the cooperation of many people to make that legacy work."
    “Bloomberg prepares for battle as legislative session starts today” The New York Sun (1/9/06)
  • The New York Observer mentioned the plan proposed by Newman Institute director Henry Wollman for the development of a hotel near the Javits Center. “Another plan that Mr. Gargano will be considering is being advocated by Henry Wollman, the director of the Steven L. Newman Real Estate Institute at Baruch College. That plan, called "The Flip," would do away with the present Javits Center entirely while building a new one in an east-west orientation, stretching between 30th and 34th streets from the West Side Highway to 10th Avenue. Mr. Gargano's office confirmed that a meeting with Mr. Wollman was imminent.”
    “Witkoff, Moinian spar in Javits hotel battle” The New York Observer (1/9/06)

  • SPA Dean David Birdsell commented on Manhattan Borough President Scott Stringer’s agenda for his new term in office. “The interim dean of public affairs at Baruch College, David Birdsell, said he expects Mr. Stringer to be more policy oriented than Ms. Fields. "It's the same job, it doesn't come with any more power," Mr. Birdsell said. "But I think you have a person who is going to spend a lot more time looking at the mechanics of government and how to make those mechanics more effective. I think you're going to see a somewhat more policy-oriented borough presidency."
    “For President Stringer, pink carpets are out, 'high energy' is the theme”The New York Sun (1/6/06)

  • Local political pundits can’t seem to get enough of SPA Prof. Doug Muzzio’s take on the City Council Speaker Christine Quinn’s successful pre and post campaign strategy. ''Chris pursued a power leadership strategy, and Bill pursued a grassroots strategy,'' said Douglas A. Muzzio, a professor of public policy at Baruch College. ''The bottom line is that the Democratic organizations still have substantial power, and Tom Manton is the kingmaker.'' 
    “New speaker had help from some powerful friends” The New York Times (1/6/06)

  • SPA Prof. Doug Muzzio commented on former Queens Democratic boss Tom Manton's role in newly elected City Council speaker Christine Quinn’s campaign. "This was deja vu all over again. It's a repeat of 2001 and once again Tom Manton won big," Doug Muzzio, a professor of public affairs at Baruch College, said yesterday. "Tom Manton got exactly what he got in 2001 - a lot," said Muzzio, who moderated a post-election forum in November with the leading candidates for council speaker.”
    “Queens boss a winner, too” New York Newsday (1/5/06)

  • It’s never too early to start campaign coverage of the next mayoral race, hence the comment by SPA Prof. Doug Muzzio on Bronx Borough President Adolfo Carrion’s bid three years from now, but strong competition is expected from City Controller William Thompson, not to mention Rep.  Anthony Weiner. "He's very smart and articulate, a thoughtful planner and he certainly has what it takes to run for citywide office," said Doug Muzzio, professor of public affairs at Baruch College, "but Billy looks like the strong candidate right now. I think Weiner has his eye on the prize and would challenge whoever runs for mayor."
    “Adolfo starts second term with an eye on Gracie” New York Daily News (1/4/06)

  • Although the outcome of the race for City Council speaker has been deadlocked for months, it appears Christine Quinn will take the seat, becoming the first woman, and openly gay woman, to hold the post. SPA Prof. Doug Muzzio commented on Queens county’s role in ending the deadlock in The New York Sun’s take on the issue. “I think it's clear from this that the county organizations are still powerful and that Queens makes out like a bandit again," a professor of public affairs at Baruch College, Douglas Muzzio, said."
    “Quinn appears set to accede as speaker” The New York Sun (1/3/06)

  • The New York Times ran a feature piece on the front page of its Job Market section touting the Executive-Student Partnership, the mentoring component of Baruch’s Executives on Campus program. “It may seem corny, but Faye Marie Trapani, 28, a second-year M.B.A. student at Baruch College in New York, says she is proud of her school's slogan: The American Dream Still Works. She sees its evidence in the people she encounters at the Executive-Student Partnership, a mentoring program that matches Baruch alumni with students seeking jobs. ''A lot of them came from nothing; they were poor kids from the city, who couldn't afford tuition,'' Ms. Trapani said.”
    “Stepping onto a career path lighted by a seasoned guide” The New York Times (1/1/06)

  • SPA Prof. Doug Muzzio commented on Mayor Bloomberg’s old and new terms in a New York Newsday article examining what’s in store on a national and local level in the year ahead.  "The second term is about legacy-building - and the first policy legacy has to be the schools," said Doug Muzzio, a professor of public affairs at Baruch College in Manhattan.”
    “2006 What’s ahead: Dreams of power, freedom, peace” New York Newsday (1/1/06)

  • Charles Urstadt, who was chairman and CEO of the Hugh L. Carey Battery Park City Authority upon its creation in 1968, recently recommended that New York city and state officials privatize the district and apply funds from sales of the properties to subsidize affordable housing development. “While accepting the first annual Visionary Leadership in Real Estate award from the Steven L. Newman Real Estate Institute of Baruch College and the City University of New York, Urstadt suggested that privatization of the district could fetch $3 billion for the authority, which is a New York State public benefit corporation.
    “BPC founder urges privatization” New York Construction (1/1/06)

  • Rumors that real estate mogul Donald Trump may run for governor of New York spurred SPA Prof. Doug Muzzio to comment, “A Trump candidacy would ''generate a huge amount of attention,'' said Baruch College politics professor Doug Muzzio. ''It would certainly energize the governor's race.'' The quote appeared in several national news outlets.
    “Trump tipped for NY post” The Sunday Telegraph (1/1/06); “Trump for New York governor?; Republican sources say billionaire may consider campaign” The Bradenton Herald (FL) (12/31/05); “Could The Donald be the one?;  Bruno says Trump mulls run at the governorship” Buffalo News (12/31/05); “Trump said to be considering run for N.Y. governor” New York Daily News (12/31/05); “In the Spotlight: Will Trump get hired by people of New York?” The Augusta Chronicle (GA) (12/31/05); “Trump for N.Y. governor?” NewsMax.com (12/30/05)

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