The Ticker : History of the Baruch College Newspaper

Moving Forward: The Ticker in the 2000s

Dear Readers,

     We eagerly look forward to hearing from you every week. The Lord knows Baruch is far from perfect. However, when our email inboxes are empty, you send us the message that everything in this school is all good and we at The Ticker are doing a top shelf job of reporting. Assuming this is far from true, please, send us a post card, a letter, an email; you can even write your comments on a piece of looseleaf, fold it into a paper airplane and sail it into our offices. If you write it, we'll print it. Tells us we suck, tell us you love us, tell us something. Thank you.

Sincerely,

Your Ticker (The Ticker, March 27, 2000, 7)

 
 
 
Ticker Banner with the New Vertical Campus
The Ticker, February 7, 2005
Vertical Campus
 
 
(Baruch College Archives)
(Photo by Alex Gelfand)
 

     The Ticker was back to its old weekly format and would soon have a new home. On August 27, 2001, when the new William and Anita Newman Vertical Campus opened to Baruch College students, The Ticker moved into its new offices on the third floor, where it remains to this day.

 
 
 
The Ticker Staff
Lexicon, 2002
The Ticker Staff
Lexicon, 2003
 
 
(Baruch College Archives)
(Baruch College Archives)
 
     Following the tragedy of September 11, 2001, the Baruch community came together on the pages of The Ticker, expressing their feelings on its pages.
 
 
 
Ticker Ad
The Ticker, September 17, 2007, 5
The Ticker Staff
Lexicon, 2005
Ticker Ad
The Ticker, August 27, 2007, 4
 
 
(Baruch College Archives)
(Baruch College Archives)
(Baruch College Archives)
 

     As in all previous years The Ticker continued to recruit staff by using their edgy humor.

 
 
 
Ticker Ad
The Ticker, December 6, 2009, 18
The Ticker Staff
Lexicon, 2006
 
 
(Baruch College Archives)
(Baruch College Archives)
 

     New columns were added to its pages, and the paper expanded in size and scope.

 
 
 
75th Anniversary Issue
The Ticker, May 7, 2007, 1
The Ticker Staff
Lexicon, 2007
 
 
(Baruch College Archives)
(Baruch College Archives)
 

The Ticker celebrated its 75th anniversary on June 6th, 2007, with a party where former Tickerites from the past three-quarters of a century assembled to reminisce about the paper.

 
 
 
From left, moderator Roslyn Bernstein
(Founder of Baruch's Journalism Program),
Stewart Kampel ('59), Caitlin Mollison ('90),
Hasani Gittens ('02), and Adrienne Rayski ('07).
(Three former Ticker editors and one current one)
Three Former Ticker Staffers
 
   

     The event drew more than 200 Ticker alumni, the eldest of whom graduated in 1939. A panel of former Ticker editors shared their experiences while in charge of the venerable paper.

There were also light and touching moments throughout the ceremony. The audience learned the long-lasting connections that can be formed among Ticker staffers by Mollison noting that 11 members of her former staff attended her wedding several years ago. Also in attendance was a gentleman whose sole reason for attending the ceremony was the hope that he would encounter fellow members of the staff he worked with many decades ago. Unfortunately, no one from his tenure was able to attend. (theTicker.org)

     In honor of the 75th anniversary of The Ticker, the college launched The Ticker Digital Archive. The Alumni Magazine highlighted the anniversary.

 
 
 
Ticker Staff
Lexicon, 2008
 
 
(Ticker.org)
(Baruch College Archives)
 

     In a digital age, The Ticker has joined other publications in providing information on its Website, where readers are able to peruse content not available in the print copy, and to post comments and letters.

 
 
 
First Known Photo of Ticker Staff
Microcosm, 1934
Latest Known Photo of Ticker Staff
Lexicon, 2009
 
 
(Courtesy of C.C.N.Y. Archives)
(Baruch College Archives)
 

     The Ticker has come a long way since its creation almost eight decades ago by disaffected students of City College who felt that their downtown campus merited a newspaper of its own. In its long existence the paper faced triumphs and defeats, but in the end it came out stronger.