The Ticker : History of the Baruch College Newspaper

Signs of Recovery: The Ticker in the 1980s

     A newspaper is an object as tangible as the human body, but the soul of a newspaper is communication.
     A newspaper is a letter to the world, a messenger in ink, a communal dialogue in picas and points.
     A newspaper isn't newsprint covered with printer's ink.
     A newspaper is what's going on, who's making it happen, and where, why and how.

     A newspaper is the people who write it and the people who read it.
     A newspaper is a candid camera producing through a series of stop-action photographs a montage of the life of its community – some shots blurred by motion, some out of the frame or focus, some genuine icons which earn a niche in the memory and influence thought.
     This newspaper is a statement of who we are. This newspaper represents us. This newspaper is us.
     We deserve a true accounting of our shared experience, an honest and relevant reflection of our actions and attitudes.
     We must recognize the power of our press – and its purpose – and the part we play in making this paper worthy of us.
     News doesn't make itself, and newspapers don't write themselves. We make the news; we are the news. We write the newspaper.
     The Ticker is whatever we want it to be and whatever we dare make it.
     Let's make The Ticker a dynamite rag.
(The Ticker, October 25, 1982, 2)

 
 
 
Ticker Staff
Lexicon, 1980
The Sentry Banner
 
 
(Baruch College Archives)
(Baruch College Archives)
 
 

     The decade began with the merging of The Ticker and The Sentry in 1980. Both papers had run into financial difficulties. In addition, The Sentry was working with a greatly reduced staff, due to the departure of a large number of graduates. Both papers hoped that, after the hard times passed, they would be able to separate into two independent papers. That hope never materialized. The Ticker once more became the only day session newspaper at Baruch.

 
 
 
The Ticker Staff
Lexicon, 1981
The Ticker Winners of Club Feud
Lexicon, 1981
 
 
(Baruch College Archives)
(Baruch College Archives)
 

     Computers were becoming more common, and Ticker sponsored its first programming contest in 1981. The same year, its staff claimed first place in the college's club feud.

 
 
 
Ticker Ad
The Ticker, February 1, 1982, 2 
Ticker Banner
The Ticker, November 16, 1981
 
 
(The Ticker Newspaper Archive)
(The Ticker Newspaper Archive)
 
     In 1982, the paper celebrated its 50th anniversary. However, unlike the 25th anniversary in 1957, this was a more somber celebration. No congratulatory letters from famous alumni graced the pages of The Ticker. The only acknowledgement was a switch to the original Ticker banner.
 
 
 
Ticker Ad
The Ticker, March 1, 1983, 3
Ticker Staff Members
Lexicon, 1983
 
 
(The Ticker Newspaper Archive)
(Baruch College Archives)
 

     The number of students working on The Ticker began to pick up once more, reaching a staff of 40 students in 1984.

 
 
 
Ticker Newsline Ad
The Ticker, February 14, 1984, 7
Ticker Staff Ad
The Ticker, December 6, 1982, 3
 
 
(The Ticker Newspaper Archive)
(The Ticker Newspaper Archive)
 

     Even with an increasing number of staff, at times Tickerites struggled to fill the pages of the Ticker:

 

It Could Be Verse

 

['T was] the week before Christmas

and all through the college,

Nothing had happened

at least not to our knowledge.

The students were busy

as haste they did make,

To complete their assignments

before Christmas break.

The Dean's latest memo

was not really news,

And parties continued

without banning the booze.

So the campus lies peaceful

to out great dismay,

For now we are left

with little to say.

(The Ticker, December 20, 1982, 2)

 

     One of the new creative ways to solve the lack of information and get students more involved was the establishment of The Ticker Newsline, where anyone could call and report the news.

 
 
 
Ticker Deadline Ad
The Ticker, October 2, 1984, 3
Ticker Staff 
Lexicon, 1983
 
 
(The Ticker Newspaper Archive)
(Baruch College Archives)
 

     Slowly the fortunes of The Ticker began to improve. A new questionnaire produced a much better return and the paper began to look forward to a better future.

 
 
 
Ticker Staff Ad
The Ticker, September 2, 1986, 2
Ticker Staff
Lexicon, 1986
 
 
(The Ticker Newspaper Archive)
(Baruch College Archives)
 

     The staff never exaggerated what they could accomplish and humorously described the conditions they were forced to work in. The Ticker office was "[...] comprised of three rooms, each about the size of a solitary confinement cell. Two radiators constantly spit out heat, so hot you can fry an egg on top."

     One member, tongue in cheek, lamented that the Tickerites were forced to work "though hunger and thirst. The paper's budget provides a dinner fund for those who work on the paper during production week. Each person is allowed $4.10 a meal ticket. Many times, for that generous amount, Chinese food fills the belly as well as the tab. […]" (The Ticker, May 10, 1983, 7)

 
 
 
Ticker Staff Ad
The Ticker, February 3, 1987, 24
Ticker Staff
Lexicon, 1987
 
 
(The Ticker Newspaper Archive)
(Baruch College Archives)
 

     Financially, The Ticker was doing better, so much so that the Board of Directors of the Bernard M. Baruch College Association approved stipends for The Ticker's editorial board. The editor-in-chief was to receive $1,200, and the news, features, and arts editors, as well as the advertising and business managers were each to receive $1,100. The money was to come from the ad revenue, which amounted to approximately $25,000 in 1987. (The Ticker, March 31, 1987, 7)

 
 
 
Ticker Staff Ad
The Ticker, October 11, 1988, B6
Ticker Staff
Lexicon, 1989
 
 
(The Ticker Newspaper Archive)
(Baruch College Archives)
 

     Although only published bi-weekly (an average of seven or eight issues a semester), the size of The Ticker kept growing. Columns that had disappeared due to lack of funding came back, and the paper returned to solid ground. The paper began to reap the rewards of the hard work of the '80s.

 
The Renaissance: The Ticker in the 1990s