The Ticker : History of the Baruch College Newspaper

From Humble Beginnings: The Ticker in the 1930s

     [...] And here's where The Ticker will help you. While we are always appreciative of the opportunity offered us by the college, in the same way as we appreciate the operation of the street cleaning department, we would not think of accepting either blindly. Where we believe that the authorities have fallen short of the mark, we will not hesitate to say so. In this way we hope to be able to achieve a better understanding between the students and the authorities. We have no intention of criticizing just for the sake of slinging mud. The pleasure we obtain therefrom is negligible. But if in any way, our criticism will help protect the right of the student, we will criticize.

     And if, on the other hand, The Ticker either fails to see its job clearly or is unfair to any one, pitch right in and give it to us. We can take it, and it may help to clarify our duties. (Address to the incoming freshmen in The Ticker, September 19, 1935, 6)

 
 
 
Michael Chernoff, First Ticker Editor
Microcosm, 1932
Earliest Known Surviving Ticker Issue
The Ticker, March 10, 1933
 
 
(Courtesy of C.C.N.Y. Archives)
(Courtesy of C.C.N.Y. Archives)
 

      The Ticker was founded at the end of the 1932 spring semester by a group of journalistically inclined students in the School of Business and Civic Administration. The founders had supposedly "closeted" themselves in a paneled room with an undisclosed number of advisers and discussed the various names that the new newspaper would bear. "Courier" and "Messenger Boy" were suggested, but "Ticker" carried the day as the most fitting title for a business school paper. The first issue was unimpressive: a "feeble six-column, four page sheet." Only two issues were printed before the end of the semester, with Mike Chernoff '32, its first editor. (Microcosm, 1933; Lexicon, 1935)

 
 
 
School of Business Freshmen
Lexicon, 1936
Dean Justin H. Moore
Lexicon, 1935
School of Business Sophomores
Lexicon, 1936
 
 
(Baruch College Archives)
(Baruch College Archives)
(Baruch College Archives)
 
 

     In the fall of 1933 the traditional feud between freshmen and sophomores became more boisterous than usual, resulting in damaged vehicles and hurt students. Justin H. Moore, the Dean of the School of Business and Civic Administration took immediate action. All damages were to be repaid by the classes involved; the police were ordered to show no leniency toward the perpetrators.

     When The Ticker printed an editorial criticizing what it perceived as a draconian reaction from the Dean, Moore immediately demanded that all future editions of the newspaper be submitted to a faculty advisor. Since The Ticker apparently did not possess a written charter, Dean Moore could exercise direct control over the paper. When Bernie Zobler '33, chief editor, and Sy Grudin '33, business manager told Moore that they could not "consistently with the ideals of student freedom and editorial liberty, which we have striven to maintain in The Ticker, accept the proposed conditions," the Dean suspended The Ticker indefinitely and both students resigned. (The Campus, October 21, 1932, 3)

 
 
 
First Known Photo of Ticker Staff
Microcosm, 1934
Clara Salinger, First Female Editor
Microcosm, 1934
 
 
(Courtesy of C.C.N.Y. Archives)
(Courtesy of C.C.N.Y. Archives)
 

     The Ticker did not stay dead for long. In a matter of weeks the students rallied and the paper was resurrected when another person was found to take the place of the editor. Irving Linn '33 became the new editor of The Ticker with the understanding that Dean Moore had the final say on the content of the paper. Linn was followed by Clara Salinger '34, the first female editor of the paper.

 
 
 
 
Censored Ticker Issue
The Ticker, April 16, 1934
Charles Reichman
Microcosm, 1934
 
 
(Courtesy of C.C.N.Y. Archives)
(Courtesy of C.C.N.Y. Archives)
 

     The paper again came into direct conflict with the administration under Charles Reichman '34, the next editor, who formulated The Ticker credo and requested a charter. Charles, an ardent pacifist, was the first editor to bring social issues from the outside world to the attention of the students. Under his guidance the first April Fools' issue, "The Shicker" was published, with the resulting suspension of Reichman and the contributing editors for two weeks. When the Dean warned The Ticker to exclude a "sizzling" editorial in its next issue, the staff printed blank editorial columns, bordered in black, marked 'censored' and resigned en masse. Following student protests, which went all the way up to the college president, Reichman returned to The Ticker after being promised a charter.

 
 
 

Lawrence Cohen
Lexicon, 1935

Ticker Staff
Lexicon, 1935

Leonard J. Hankin
Lexicon, 1935

 
 
(Baruch College Archives)
(Baruch College Archives)
(Baruch College Archives)
 

     Reichman was not able to gain a charter for The Ticker, but Lawrence Cohen '35, the next editor, together with Leonard J. Hankin '36, his managing editor, had more luck. After weeks of persistent demands, the faculty gave in and agreed to give The Ticker a charter that took most of the regulatory powers out of the hands of the Dean.

     The governing body of The Ticker became the Ticker Association, a group consisting of four students elected by the Student Council and four professors selected from the college. Their main task was to regulate The Ticker by appointing its editor and business manager, as well as to distribute The Ticker budget.

 
 
 
Ticker Staff
Lexicon, 1938
Ticker Staff
Lexicon, 1939
 
 
(Baruch College Archives)
(Baruch College Archives)
 

     The Ticker, its presence increasingly felt around the school, began to receive its first awards. Competing against 214 other college newspapers, it was continually given a first-class honor rating by the National Scholastic Press Association of the University of Minnesota's Department of Journalism.

 
 
 
George Weissman '39
Lexicon, 1939
Ticker Staff
Lexicon, 1937
 
 
(Baruch College Archives)
(Baruch College Archives)
 

     The fortunes of The Ticker rose even higher when, during the fall semester of 1938, under the leadership of its new editor, George Weissman '39, it announced an increase of 50 percent in its format, turning it into a six-column paper.

   
   
   
Ticker Ad for "U" Books
The Ticker, September 21, 1938, 3
   
   
(The Ticker Newspaper Archive)
   

     At the time, the majority of funding for The Ticker came from two sources: advertisements and the so-called "U-books." The U-books were a form of I.D., purchased every semester, which enabled students to participate in extracurricular activities at the college, receive The Ticker, and various discounts available on and around campus. However, if at any point not enough students purchased U-books, the extracurricular activities in the college, including the newly expanded Ticker, suffered greatly.

 
 
 
Ticker Movie and Dance Revival Ad
The Ticker, October 30, 1939, 3
Ticker Staff
Lexicon, 1939
 
 
(The Ticker Newspaper Archive)
(Baruch College Archives)
 

     This is precisely what happened soon after the announced expansion. Due to bad U-book sales, The Ticker was forced to go back to its old format. Moreover, it became difficult to find enough funds to keep the original-size paper in print. Out of desperation and a need to raise some quick funds The Ticker Movie and Dance Revival was born.

     Perhaps you've been wondering why The Ticker is stepping out of its journalist boots to run a movie revival and dance. Here's the answer: The Ticker needs money, and needs it badly to continue as a weekly newspaper.

     You are being called upon to aid in saving The Ticker. By buying your tickets and attending the affair, you can help us raise the necessary funds to publish the paper regularly. This is not a gag! We aren't fooling you! You know we've skipped issues in the past! We need money! (The Ticker, October 23, 1939, 2)

     The show featured old silent movies, a more contemporary theater show, and a dance. The event drew more than fifteen hundred people, and assured a continued existence for the publication into the next decade.

 
War and Peace: The Ticker in the 1940s