Financial Aid

Satisfactory Academic Progress and Aid Eligibility

Recipients of federal and state aid programs must make satisfactory academic progress towards completion of their degree. Students who fail to meet the academic progress measures will lose their eligibility for financial aid.

 Federal Title IV Aid- Satisfactory Academic Progress - (SAP)

Baruch College students who do not make satisfactory academic progress towards their degree will not be eligible for the following federal Title IV aid programs.

  • Federal Pell Grants ??
  • Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants ?
  • Federal Work Study Program ?
  • Federal Perkins Loans ?
  • Federal Direct Loan Programs, both Subsidized and Unsubsidized loans.
  • Federal Parent PLUS Loan Program
  • Federal Graduate PLUS Loan Program.

The Office of Financial Aid Services reviews academic records annually after the spring semester to monitor that students are making progress towards degree completion.

Students are required to meet qualitative and quantitative measures at the time their academic records are evaluated. In addition, students must not exceed the maximum timeframe of their established program length to be considered to be making satisfactory academic progress towards their degree.

Qualitative Measure

 All students must achieve a minimum cumulative GPA at each SAP evaluation. Below are the measures.

UNDERGRADUATES*

If you have attempted?

You must have a?

0.5 to 12 credit hours

1.50 cumulative GPA

13 to 24 credit hours

1.75 cumulative GPA

Greater than 25 credit hours

2.00 cumulative GPA

 

 

GRADUATES

If you have attempted?

You must have a?

0.5 or more credit hours

3.0 cumulative GPA

 

*Undergraduates enrolled in an educational program of more than two academic years must have a GPA of at least “C” or the equivalent at the end of the second academic year. This means that a student must maintain a minimum 2.0 GPA after being at the school for four semesters without regard to enrollment status and the table above.

Quantitative Measure

 All students must earn a percentage of all credits attempted in order to complete their degree requirements within the maximum timeframe.

For baccalaureate programs, earned credits must be equal to or greater than [(.75 x cumulative credits attempted) - 18].

Example: If an undergraduate student has attempted 60 credit hours, they must have earned 27 of those credits to meet the quantitative measure. [60 x .75 = 45 ? 18 = 27]

For masters programs, earned credits must be equal or greater than [(.6666 x cumulative credits attempted]

Example: If a graduate student has attempted 18 credit hours, they must have earned 12 of those credits to meet the quantitative measure. [18 x .6666 = 11.999 = 12]

 

UNDERGRADUATES ? Pace of Progress

If you have attempted?

You must have earned?

0.5 to 29 credit hours

0 credits

?30 to 44 credit hours

5 credits

45 to 59 credit hours

16 credits

60 to 74 credit hours

27 credits

75 to 89 credit hours

39 credits

90 to 104 credit hours

50 credits

105 to 119 credit hours

61 credits

120 to 134 credit hours

72 credits

135 to 149 credit hours

84 credits

150 to 164 credit hours

95 credits

165 to 180 credit hours

120 credits

GRADUATES- Pace of Progress

Graduate students must earn 2/3 of the credit hours that they attempt.

 

Maximum Timeframe

 Students may not attempt more than 150% of the credits normally required for completion of the degree.

Example 1: If an undergraduate degree program length is 120 credit hours, students may not attempt more than 180 credits and remain eligible for federal aid. [120 attempted credits x 150%= 180 maximum]

 Example 2: If a graduate degree program length is 36 credit hours, students may not attempt more than 54 credits and remain eligible for federal aid. [36 attempted credits x 150%= 54 maximum]

 

Determining Attempted Credits and Accumulated Credits in Quantitative Measure.

 

 1. Remedial Courses

Remedial courses do not carry degree credit and are not included in the total cumulative attempted credits or earned credits for determining pace of progression. However, the credit-bearing portion of compensatory or developmental courses would be included in the cumulative earned and/or attempted credit totals for determining pace.

2. Withdrawals

Withdrawals which are recorded on a student’s permanent record will be included as cumulative attempted credits and will have an adverse effect on a student’s ability to meet the pace of progression standard. Withdrawals are indicated by the following grades: W, WA, and WU.

 3. Incomplete Grades

Courses with incomplete grades are included as cumulative attempted credits. However, these courses cannot be used as credits accumulated toward the degree since successful completion is the criterion for positive credit accumulation. If the student fails to meet the pace of progression standard due to the lack of successful completion grades for incomplete courses, the recording of successful completion grades within a term which brings the accumulated credit level to the appropriate standard will restore eligibility for the term and subsequent terms within the academic year. 

4. Repeated Courses

Successfully completed courses can generally be accepted toward degree requirements once. However, each time a student attempts a course, even if that course is part of a forgiveness or amnesty policy whereby credits attempted and grades earned in prior semesters are excluded from the GPA, it must be included as part of the cumulative attempted credit record for the measuring of pace of progression. Therefore, repeated courses, regardless of the prior grade, reduce a student’s capacity to meet the pace of progression standard.

 5. Transfer of Credit

Transfer students from colleges inside and outside of CUNY shall have their pace of progression status initialized for purposes of satisfactory academic progress measurement by using the number of credits determined to be acceptable toward the degree as both cumulative attempted credits and cumulative earned credits earned.

 

Treatment of Non-Standard Situations

 1. Readmitted Students

A student not making SAP cannot re-establish eligibility for Title IV program assistance by reenrolling after a one year or longer period of non-reenrollment. Upon readmission after any period of non-reenrollment, the student’s Title IV progress standing must be reevaluated for SAP under the standard as the record stood at the end of their last term of attendance. If the student has taken any action during the period of non-reenrollment that would bring him or her into compliance with the progress standard (e.g., successfully completing transferable courses at another institution during the period of absence), this should also be factored into the reassessment. If the readmitted student has not taken any such action, or if the action taken is not sufficient to bring the student back into compliance with the progress standard, the student remains on financial aid suspension and must file a successful appeal to re-establish eligibility.

2. Second Degree Students

Students enrolling for a second baccalaureate, graduate or associate degree shall have their pace of progression status initialized for purposes of satisfactory academic progress measurement by using the number of credits determined to be acceptable toward the degree as both the students’ cumulative attempted credits and cumulative earned credits.

 3. Change of Major

Students who change majors within the same degree must complete the degree within the maximum time-frame.

4. Change of Degree

If a student changes their objective and begins pursuing a different degree must complete the degree within the maximum time-frame.

Financial Aid Suspension

Undergraduate students who do not meet the minimum undergraduate standard and graduate students who do not meet the minimum graduate standard are placed on financial aid suspension and lose their eligibility to participate in federal student aid programs. Students on financial aid suspension will remain ineligible for Title IV federal student assistance until they take actions that once again bring them into compliance.

Right To Appeal

Students who have been placed on financial aid suspension may appeal through the normal institutional academic appeals process to retain eligibility for Title IV assistance. Students may appeal any component of the SAP standard they have not been able to meet including not meeting the minimum GPA and exceeding the maximum time-frame for program completion.An appeal must be based upon mitigating circumstances resulting from events such as personal illness or injury, illness or death of a family member, loss of employment, or changes in the academic program.

The student’s appeal must include:

a) the reasons why the student failed to make SAP and b) what has changed in his or her situation that will allow the student to demonstrate SAP at the next evaluation.

The appeal may be granted if the school:

? Determines that the student will be able to meet the appropriate SAP standard by

the end of the next semester

?OR

 ? Develops an academic plan for the student that, if followed, will ensure that the

student will either be able to meet the appropriate SAP standard by a specific

point in time or achieve completion of his or her academic program.

For Spring 2014 consideration, the appeal form must be submitted to Financial Aid Services no later than January 16th, 2014.

Undergraduate Title IV Academic Appeal Form

Graduate Title IV Academic Appeal Form

Financial Aid Probation

A student who has been granted an appeal will be placed on financial aid probation. Students in this status have their eligibility for Title IV program assistance reinstated for one payment period (semester). At the end of the probationary semester, the institution must review the student’s academic progress to determine whether the student has met the appropriate SAP standard or has fulfilled the requirements specified in the student’s academic plan. A student who once again meets the appropriate progress standard after the probationary semester will continue to receive Title IV assistance until the next scheduled progress evaluation. Students who meet all the conditions of their academic plan at the end of the probationary semester will continue to receive Title IV assistance on a monitored, semester by semester basis until the next scheduled progress evaluation. There is no limit on the number of times a student may follow the financial aid appeals procedure. Although a student may file only one appeal semester, additional appeals to extend financial aid probation to subsequent semesters are allowed. As in the original appeal, the student would indicate the mitigating circumstances, the reasons why SAP was not achieved, and what has changed that will ensure the student will be able to meet SAP at the next evaluation. If a student fails to meet the conditions of an approved academic plan, he or she may submit an additional appeal to modify or adjust the plan for the subsequent semester documenting any unusual circumstances that prevented them from meeting the goals established by the original plan. The college may approve or decline the subsequent appeal and may create an updated plan based on the information submitted.

Re-establishing Eligibility

Other than having eligibility restored through filing a successful appeal, a student on financial aid suspension may regain eligibility only by taking action that brings him or her into compliance with the appropriate progress standard. Students who choose to remain enrolled without receiving Title IV aid may request a review of their academic record after any term in which they were on financial aid suspension to determine if they were able to reattain the appropriate standard. If a student is on financial aid suspension at the beginning of the academic year for not meeting one or more components of the school’s SAP standard, but meets them at some point later in the academic year, the student may regain Title IV eligibility as follows:

Federal Pell Grant/Campus-based Funds

For Pell Grant and campus-based programs, the student regains eligibility retroactively to the beginning of the most recent payment period during which the student once again met the school’s satisfactory academic progress standards.

Federal Direct Loan and FFEL Programs

For Federal Direct and FFEL program funds, the student regains eligibility for the entire period of enrollment.