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The Baruch College Faculty Handbook

           Mission Statement   
      
Department of Political Science



Last updated on 4/23/09

Introduction

          "Popular education,” Lawrence Creamin, the pre-eminent historian of education long ago observed, “is as radical an idea as Americans have embraced. It is by this very nature fraught with difficulty, and the institutions we have established to achieve it are undeniably flawed. Yet it is important to be aware of what has been accomplished.” Nowhere is popular education more radical than in colleges, where the drive for excellence and the inertia of tradition may collide with commitments to inclusion and diversity. And perhaps in no college is popular education more radical than Baruch, with the most diverse student body in the nation, hailing from one of the most demographically complex metropolises in the world.

          We in the department of political science fully support the egalitarian and transformative mission of the college. And we echo the college’s conviction, as stated in its Strategic Plan, that “achieving excellence is central to everything we do,” whether in scholarship, teaching, or service.

The department has eight missions:

  • to generate political knowledge to be used by academics and the society at large;
  • to help majors gain a reasonably sophisticated understanding of political structures, processes, and ideas;
  • to help minors gain a sound understanding of political structures, processes, and ideas;
  • to help other students gain a basic understanding of political structures, processes, and ideas;
  • to help students acquire and establish habits of critical independent thinking about political topics;
  • to help students hone their skills in oral and written communication and analysis;
  • to help prepare students for careers in law, government, journalism, and education; and not least,
  • to help students fulfill their role as citizens in a democracy.

The Faculty

          There are twelve full time faculty and fourteen adjunct faculty in the department of political science. All the department’s full time faculty have doctorates from major research universities, as do most of the adjunct faculty. Of the full time faculty, eleven are tenured. The faculty provide expertise in all six disciplinary subfields, and represent the full range of disciplinary perspectives, and in these respects compare favorably with typical peer departments.