The Baruch College Faculty Handbook

Master Teacher Series at Baruch College

Last updated on 11/17/2010

Great teachers can inspire great teaching and offer substantive advice on proven methods that have helped many students to learn. Generous support from the Baruch College Fund allows us to bring to Baruch extraordinary teachers and presenters to lead workshops focusing on issues and techniques related to teaching and learning. All members of the faculty are welcome, but space for these events is limited. Refreshments will be served at each event. When resources allow (these opportunities will be announced), members of the adjunct faculty are paid at the 60% rate. (Follow this link for other faculty development events at Baruch College.)

 

 

Master Teacher Series Fall 2010


ASWATH DAMODARAN

Teaching: Art or Science?
Tuesday, November 23, 12:45-2:30 pm, NVC 12-150

Aswath Damodaran, Professor of Finance at NYU’s Stern School of Business will return to Baruch to present on his favorite topic, Teaching: Art or Science. Damodaran has presented here twice before to great acclaim. He teaches very large classes at NYU, but many of his ideas and suggestions are equally applicable to much smaller classes. Damodaran’s skill and enthusiasm in the classroom have garnered him the Schools of Business Excellence in Teaching Award in 1988, the Distinguished Teaching award from NYU in 1990, and he has been voted "Professor of the Year" by the graduating MBA class five times during his career at NYU.
RSVP to Vanessa Cano: Vanessa.Cano@baruch.cuny.edu  or  646-660-6517.

 

Master Teacher Series Spring 2010


LORETTA GRAY

Grammar in the Writing Process
The same program will be presented twice:
Tuesday, March 16, 10:30 am-12 pm, NVC 14-285
Tuesday, March 16 2:30-4:00 pm
, NVC 14-285
For students who have not grown up in an English-speaking home, writing in English is clearly a matter of language acquisition. However, even for many native speakers, learning academic English is akin to becoming fluent in a new language. Taking second-language acquisition theory as her starting point, Loretta Gray, professor of English at Central Washington University, will invite workshop participants to examine ways that a model used to discuss the acquisition of a target language can be adjusted for teachers interested in helping their students become fluent writers. She will present various types of grammar-based activities and explain their uses in composition pedagogy. Loretta Gray's publications include Rhetorical Grammar, The Writer's Harbrace Handbook, English Verbs, and Idiomatic English.
RSVP: Vanessa.Cano@baruch.cuny.edu


ASWATH DAMODARAN- VIDEO of this presentation
Teaching: Art or Science?
Tuesday, April 27, 3:00-4:30pm, NVC 14-280
Aswath Damodaran is Professor of Finance at NYU's Stern School of Business. His skill and enthusiasm in the classroom garnered him the Schools of Business Excellence in Teaching Award in 1988, 1991, 1992, 1999, 2001, 2007, and 2008 and the Distinguished Teaching award from NYU in 1990. He has been voted "Professor of the Year" by the graduating MBA class seven times during his career at NYU. His appearance on the Master Teacher Series in April 2006 was judged a great success by attendees. Prof. Damodaran's pdf handout from his workshop is available.
RSVP: Vanessa.Cano@baruch.cuny.edu

Master Teacher Series Fall 2009

MICHAEL SANDEL
Justice: What's the Right Thing to Do?
Thursday, November 19, 7 pm, Mason Hall
Michael Sandel is well known for being successful at engaging students in large classes. Ken Bain’s What the Best College Teachers Do (Harvard, 2004) describes Sandel’s highly interactive lectures for more than 1000 Harvard undergrads as models of effective teaching and learning. Sandel’s topic is justice, and he has just published a new book, Justice: What’s the Right Thing to Do? (Farrar, Straus, and Giroux, 2009). The book and Sandel’s lectures are the focus of a new PBS TV series; hence a series of public interviews (Today Show, Charlie Rose, etc.), a major piece in the Times (on September 25), and a national speaking tour.

Sandel’s New York appearance will be at Baruch. Although he will not be speaking about teaching per se, his talk promises to draw on techniques similar to those he employs in his classes. (You can gain a sense of what his classes are like via justiceharvard.org.)

Sandel’s presentation, which is co-sponsored by the Provost’s Office and by The Robert Zicklin Center for Corporate Integrity, is free and open to the public. Please come and please invite your students. Please RSVP: http://zicklin.baruch.cuny.edu/centers/zcci/zcci-events/justice-what2019s-the-right-thing-to-do. A video recording of this event is part of Baruch's Digital Media Library and available for viewing.

KEN BAIN
The Promising Syllabus and Transforming Lectures
Wednesday, December 2, 10 am-12 pm, NVC 14-280
One of our first such presenters in this Master Teacher Series several years ago was Ken Bain, the author of What the Best College Teachers Do (Harvard, 2004). Owing to the positive response to Bain’s presentation, we invited him back the next year, but now haven’t heard from him for a while. He will return to Baruch on Wednesday, December 2 to update us on his research about the approaches that lead to the deepest learning. All members of the faculty are welcome, but space for these events is limited. Please let Vanessa Cano know if you plan to attend: Vanessa.Cano@baruch.cuny.edu or  646-660-6500.



      Master Teacher Series Fall 2008

Videos of the Fall 2008 presentations (and many from previous semesters) may be viewed at our site within Baruch College's Digital Media Library.

JOHN BEAN
From Novice to Expert: Designing Writing Assignments to Teach Disciplinary Ways of Thinking and Arguing
The same program will be presented twice:
Tuesday, Oct. 14, 10:30 am-12 noon, 151 East 25th Street, Room 763
Tuesday, Oct. 14, 1-2:30 pm, 151 East 25th Street, Room 763
 
Bean’s book Engaging Ideas: The Professor’s Guide to Writing, Critical Thinking, and Active Learning in the Classroom (Jossey-Bass, 1996) has been extremely well received by many members of our faculty as well as by a national audience. His premise: “Integrating writing and other critical thinking activities into a course increases students’ learning while teaching them thinking skills for posing questions, proposing hypotheses, gathering and analyzing data, and making arguments.” In this discussion, Bean, a professor of English at Seattle University, will draw upon the arsenal of suggestions presented in Engaging Ideas.
RSVP to Juan Pagan juan.pagan@baruch.cuny.edu or 646-660-6500


EDWARD DECI
Facilitating Motivation and Psychological Well-Being in Universities
The same program will be presented twice:
Thursday, Oct. 30, 10:30 am-12 noon, NVC 14-270
Thursday, Oct. 30, 1-2:30 pm, NVC 14-270

Edward Deci, professor of psychology and Gowen Professor in the Social Sciences at the University of Rochester, is a founder of Self-Determination Theory (SDT), one of today’s most influential motivational theories. He writes of his work: “I examine a variety of issues in human motivation, isolating basic processes and testing their application to education, health care, parenting, mental health, and work organizations in the U.S. and across cultures. Using both laboratory and field methods, my work focuses primarily on the nature and development of self-determination.”
RSVP to Juan Pagan juan.pagan@baruch.cuny.edu or 646-660-6500


MARTINA BODE and MARY SCHULLER
“Clickers” in Classes
The same program will be presented twice:
Monday, Nov. 10, 11 am-12:30 pm, 151 East 25th Street, Room 763
Monday, Nov. 10, 1:30-3 pm, 151 East 25th Street, Room 763

Would you like to know how well your students can apply course material—as you are presenting it to them? Martina Bode, senior lecturer of mathematics at Northwestern University, and Mary Schuller, Northwestern’s manager of faculty support services, demonstrate how electronic response systems can stimulate student engagement and provide immediate feedback about what they are truly learning.
RSVP to Juan Pagan juan.pagan@baruch.cuny.edu or 646-660-6500


RICHARD LIGHT
Strengthening Student Success: Six Suggestions
Wednesday, Nov. 19, 10 am-12 noon, NVC 14-250
Richard Light is Walter H. Gale Professor of Education of the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. His award-winning book, Making the Most of College (Harvard, 2001), which is based on 10 years of student interviews, will serve as a springboard for discussion of effective, organized teaching, focused on connecting abstract academic ideas to more practical, quotidian thoughts.
RSVP to Juan Pagan juan.pagan@baruch.cuny.edu or 646-660-6500


CHARLIE CANNON
Thinking Together: Collaboration and Engagement
The same program will be presented twice:
Tuesday, Dec. 2, 12:30-2 pm, NVC 14-270
Tuesday, Dec. 2, 3-4:30 pm, NVC 14-270

Charlie Cannon is a faculty member of the Rhode Island School of Design (RISD) and co-founder of LOCAL Architecture Research Design. He draws on his experience to discuss how to use real, complex problems to engage students, and engage them to work together, to seek solutions that are creative and indeed innovative. His methods for creating collaboration across disciplines have been featured in the Chronicle of Higher Education. At RISD Cannon has twice been nominated for the prestigious Frazier Teaching Award.
RSVP to Juan Pagan juan.pagan@baruch.cuny.edu or 646-660-6500

 

      Master Teacher Series 2007-2008

MEL SILBERMAN
More Active Learning Strategies
The same program will be presented twice.
Tuesday, September 25, 12:45-2:30 pm, NVC 14-280
Tuesday, September 25, 4:00-5:45 pm, NVC 14-280

Psychologist Mel Silberman, a pioneer in training and performance growth, returns after speaking at Baruch in spring 2007. He brings a wealth of experience in applying creative learning strategies to animate the classroom. Silberman teachers at Temple University, where he won two awards for distinguished teaching.
RSVP to Abigail Stevens at Abigail_Stevens@baruch.cuny.edu or 646-660-6500.


JIM EISON
Promoting Deep Learning
The same program will be presented twice.
Monday, October 15, 10:30 am-12:30 pm, NVC 14-280
Monday, October 15, 4:00-6:00 pm, NVC 14-280

All too many students are content scratching the surface of assigned course readings and to memorize what might appear on tests. Eison delves into the challenge of developing instructional strategies that stimulate students to probe more deeply into course material. He is the founding director of the Center for Teaching Enhancement at the University of Florida where he is also a professor.
RSVP to Abigail Stevens at Abigail_Stevens@baruch.cuny.edu or 646-660-6500.


JEANETTE NORDEN - two presentations
Promoting Intellectual and Personal Development
Wednesday, November 28, 11:00 am-12:30 pm, NVC 14-250
A neuroscientist and professor at Vanderbilt University, Norden demonstrates how the instructor's underlying goals should help guide decisions in the classroom regardless of subject matter. She explores how her objective to advance intellectual and personal growth has impacted what and how she teaches.
Stimulating Learning In Our Students - Effective Teaching Strategies
Wednesday, November 28, 1:00-2:30 pm, NVC 14-250
Teaching excellence involves communicating effectively, stimulating curiosity, and promoting a multi-layered understanding of topics. Norden shares approaches and methods that foster such environments.
RSVP to Abigail Stevens at Abigail_Stevens@baruch.cuny.edu or 646-660-6500.


SAUNDRA MCGUIRE
Learning Styles and Teaching Students how to Learn
The same program will be presented twice.
Monday, February 25, 10:30 am-12 pm, NVC 14-250
Monday, February 25, 1:00-2:30 pm, NVC 14-250

A recipient of multiple teaching awards, McGuire visits from Louisiana State University where she is Director of the Center for Academic Success and Associate Dean of University College. Among her passionate interests is techniques which facilitate valuable communication and learning.
RSVP to Juan Pagan at Juan_Pagan@baruch.cuny.edu or 646-660-6500.
Click here to view a video of Prof. McGuire's presentation.

KEN BAIN
Constructive Alignment: Fostering Deep Learning
Monday, March 31, 11:30 am-1:00 pm, NVC 14-250
Baruch welcomes back a regular speaker in our Master Teacher Series. Bain's award-winning book, What the Best College Teachers Do (Harvard, 2004), will serve as a springing-off point as he reminds us that the best teaching is about deep learning.
RSVP
to Juan Pagan at Juan_Pagan@baruch.cuny.edu or 646-660-6500.
Click here to view a video of Ken Bain's presentation.

DONALD SAARI
Is there a New Isaac Newton in My Class?
Tuesday, April 1, 3:00-4:30 pm, H-763
"What does this have to do with me?" is often written on students' faces. Saari, Distinguished Professor of Mathematics and Economics at the University of California, Irvine, will address the disconnect that arises when what is discussed in the classroom seems to have little connection with the real world. He reveals how even the smallest detail may illuminate larger concepts.
RSVP
to Juan Pagan at Juan_Pagan@baruch.cuny.edu or 646-660-6500Click here to view a video of Prof. Saari's presentation.


CLAUDE STEELE
The Psychology of Social Identity: Its Role in Group Performance and the Challenges of an Integrated Society
Wednesday, April 30
, 12:45-2:15 pm, H-763
Steele's presentation is rooted in research aimed at identifying unseen pressures on the academic performance of groups whose abilities are negatively stereotyped - such as women and minorities. He is the Lucie Stern Professor of the Social Sciences at Stanford University.
RSVP to Juan Pagan at Juan_Pagan@baruch.cuny.edu or 646-660-6500
Click here to view a video of Prof. Steele's presentation.

   

   Master Teacher Series 2006-2007

STEPHEN BROOKFIELD - VIDEO of this presentation
Becoming a Critically Reflective Teacher
Tuesday, September 12, 12:30-2:00 pm, NVC 14-270
Distinguished University Professor at the University of St. Thomas in Minneapolis, Minnesota, Stephen Brookfield has written ten books on adult learning, teaching, critical thinking, discussion methods, and critical theory. This workshop is based on Brookfield’s Becoming a Critically Reflective Teacher (Jossey Bass Higher and Adult Education Series, 1995). Follow this link for more information on Prof. Brookfield.
RSVP to Abigail Stevens at Abigail_Stevens@baruch.cuny.edu or 646-660-6500.


SHERRY LEE LINKON - VIDEO of this presentation
How Can Assessment Work for Us?
Thursday, October 26, 10:00-11:15, NVC 14-269
One facet of good teaching includes assessing how what is covered in class relates to what students actually learn. While some assessment is so ingrained as to be almost reflexive, much of the current discussion focuses on making other practices more intentional. Dr. Linkon is the author an article that appeared in Academe in summer 2005 with the same title as that of today's discussion. She is Professor of English and American Studies at Youngstown State University, where she is also Co-Director of The Center for Working-Class Studies. Follow this link for more information on Prof. Linkon.
RSVP to Abigail Stevens at Abigail_Stevens@baruch.cuny.edu or 646-660-6500.


STEPHANIE NICKERSON
Best Practices in Class Observation
Wednesday, November 15, 2:00-4:00, NVC 14-280
Faculty members at Baruch observe each other in the classroom on a regular basis. This workshop is designed to help observers conduct effective class observations by introducing them to a format and approach that can reduce anxiety on the part of observed instructors and increase observers’ ability to see meaningful teaching behavior. Following the process can improve the experience for both observers and the instructors they observe. Stephanie Nickerson taught college and graduate school students for 22 years. She started a Teaching and Learning Center at the New School and worked at NYU for many years as an Instructional Consultant. She has been working with individual faculty members at Baruch since December 2005.
RSVP to Abigail Stevens at Abigail_Stevens@baruch.cuny.edu or 646-660-6500.

MEL SILBERMAN
Getting Started with Active Learning
Wednesday, February 7, 12:30-2:30 pm, NVC 14-285

Wednesday, February 7, 6:00-8:00 pm, NVC 14-285

Dr. Mel Silberman is a psychologist known internationally as a pioneer in the areas of active learning, interpersonal intelligence, and team development. He is Professor of Adult and Organizational Development at Temple University and President of "Active Training," a company based in Princeton, NJ. Two of Dr. Silberman's books are available in the Baruch bookstore:

  • Active Learning: 101 Strategies to Teach Any Subject (Allyn & Bacon, 1996)
  • Teaching Actively (Allyn & Bacon, 2005)

"Where Active Learning is the ultimate book of recipes for improving classroom teaching, Teaching Actively shows you how to become an exceptional chef. From engaging students to presenting brain-friendly instruction, Teaching Actively is an approach to teaching that you can use to dramatically improve learning in your classroom." (Amazon.com)


KEN BAIN
What the Best College Teachers Do
Friday, March 16, 10:00-12:30, NVC 14-270
Discussion led by Ken Bain (Montclair State College) based on his book What the Best College Teachers Do (Harvard, 2004). Internationally recognized for his insights into teaching and learning, and for a fifteen-year study of what the best educators do, Dr. Bain has presented invited workshops or lectures at nearly two hundred universities and events throughout the world, including three at Baruch in spring 2006.


ASWATH DAMODARAN 
Teaching: Art or Science?
Tuesday, April 24, 12:30-2:30, NVC 14-285
Aswath Damodaran is Professor of Finance at NYU's Stern School of Business. His skill and enthusiasm in the classroom garnered him the Schools of Business Excellence in Teaching Award in 1988, and the Distinguished Teaching award from NYU in 1990. He has been voted "Professor of the Year" by the graduating MBA class five times during his career at NYU.

                 Master Teacher Series 2005-2006

JANNETTE NORDEN
Teaching Effectiveness in Large Classes
Monday, November 7, 12:00 - 1:30pm, NVC 14-250
Professor and Director of Medical Education, Vanderbilt Medical School, and winner of numerous awards for teaching, Dr. Norden was referred to recently as "the best teacher [he] had ever seen" by Ken Bain (see below), author of What the Best Teachers Do (Harvard University Press, 2004).
RSVP to Abigail Stevens at Abigail_Stevens@baruch.cuny.edu  or  646-312-6500.
 

KEN BAIN
What Do the Best Teachers Do? Creating Powerful Learning Environments for Students
Tuesday, January 17, 11:30am - 1:30pm, NVC 14-250
Tuesday, January 17, 6:00pm - 8:00pm, NVC 14-250

(the same program will be presented twice)
Internationally recognized for his insights into teaching and learning, and for a fifteen-year study of what the best educators do, Ken Bain has presented invited workshops or lectures at nearly two hundred universities and events throughout the world. Founding Director of the Center for Teaching Excellence at New York University, his recently published book, What the Best College Teachers Do (Harvard University Press, 2004) won the 2004 Virginia and Warren Stone Prize for an outstanding book on education and society.


KEN BAIN
Developing the Promising Syllabus
Thursday, February 23, 12:00pm - 2:00pm, NVC 14-250
This presentation will be a follow-up to those on January 17.

 
STEPHEN BROOKFIELD
Becoming a Critically Reflective Teacher
Monday, March 13, 6:00 pm - 8:00pm, NVC 14-750
Tuesday, March 14, 9:30am - 11:30am, NVC 14-250

(the same program will be presented twice)
Distinguished University Professor at the University of St. Thomas in Minneapolis, Minnesota, Stephen Brookfield has written ten books on adult learning, teaching, critical thinking, discussion methods, and critical theory. This workshop is based on Brookfield’s Becoming a Critically Reflective Teacher (Jossey Bass Higher and Adult Education Series, 1995).


ROBERT KEGAN
Personal Learning and Professional Development
Monday, April 10, 12:00pm - 3:00pm, NVC 14-250
William and Miriam Meehan Professor of Adult Learning and Professional Development at Harvard University Graduate School of Education, Robert Kegan is a psychologist whose work focuses on adult development, adult learning, and professional development. His most recent book (co-authored) is How the Way We Talk Can Change the Way We Work: Seven Languages for Transformation (Josey, Bass, 2000).


JACK BREIHAN
Designing Assessment-Centered Courses
Wednesday, May 3, 12:30-2:30, NVC 14-250
Professor of History at Loyola College, Jack Breihan has published widely in four fields: British history, history pedagogy, architecture and planning, and aviation. He is co-author of Thinking and Writing in College: A Naturalistic Study in Four Disciplines (Urbana, Ill.: NCTE, 1991).