The Baruch College Faculty Handbook

Faculty Development Seminars 2010-2011

Last updated on 2/29/2012

 

Support for many of these seminars is provided in part by the Baruch College Fund. Also see the archived series for 2002-2003, 2003-2004, 2004-2005, 2005-2006, 2006-2007, 2007-2008, 2008-2009, and 2009-2010. For Research Without Borders (presentations about their research by members of the Baruch faculty and invited guests), go here.

Please feel free to send ideas for seminars to
Associate Provost Dennis Slavin.

 

SEMINARS IN SPRING 2011

 

E-Rosters
Monday, January 31, 1-2:00pm, NVC 8-160

This workshop will explain how to create and print a roll book roster using one of our pre-formatted templates. Additional session on Tues., Feb. 1, 1-1:30, NVC 9-150. For a complete description of this workshop please click here.

Introduction to Blackboard
Tuesday, February 1, 1-2:00pm, NVC 6-165

This hands-on session is designed for instructors, graduate assistants, and staff with little or no prior Blackboard experience who will learn about the basic tools. Additional sessions on Thurs., Feb. 3, 12-1:00pm, NVC 8-160 and Tues., Feb. 8, 1-2:00pm, NVC 6-165. For a complete description of this workshop please click here.

Overview of Smart Classrooms
Tuesday, February 1, 1-2:00pm, NVC 9-150

This workshop will cover lectern control pads, display features, overhead projectors, and classroom support staff. Additional sessions on Wed., Feb. 2, 1-2:00pm, NVC 9-150; Thurs., Feb. 3, 1-2:00pm, TBA and Tues., Feb. 8, 1-2:00pm, NVC 9-150. For a complete description of this workshop please click here.

General Overview of Technology Services at Baruch
Wednesday, February 2, 1-2:00pm, NVC 6-160

This hands-on workshop is designed for the instructor just starting at Baruch or who would like to refresh their knowledge of viewing online Rosters, accessing Blackboard, utilizing library resources, etc. For a complete description of this workshop please click here.

Blogs@Baruch
Tuesday, February 3, 1-2:00pm, NVC 3-125

This workshop will explore the variety of ways that Blogs@Baruch is/can be used throughout the Baruch community and its pedagogical, curricular, and administrative implications. Additional session on Thurs., Feb. 10, 1-2:00pm, NVC 8-160. For a complete description of this workshop please click here.

Introduction to Video Services
Thursday, February 9, 1-2:30pm, 151 E25 St., Room 617

This workshop will explore the basics of video production and the equipment/resources available through BCTC and Department of Media Resources. For a complete description of this workshop please click here.

Blogs@Baruch
Thursday, February 10, 1-2:00pm, NVC 8-160

See Feb. 3 listing for more information.

An In-Depth Comparison of Web Browsers
Monday, February 14, 1-2:00pm, NVC 6-160

This workshop will compare the features and performance of the browsers of Internet Explorer, Firefox, Chrome, Opera and Maxthon.
For a complete description of this workshop please click here.

Introduction to Plagiarism Detection Software (Turnitin)
Tuesday, February 15, 1-2:00pm, NVC 6-165

Learn about Turnitin, a plagiarism detection and prevention service that automatically scans students’ submitted papers to pinpoint content that is unoriginal. Additional session on Tues., Mar. 8, 1-2:00pm, NVC 8-160.
For a complete description of this workshop please click here.

Introduction to Student Response System ("Clickers")
Tuesday, February 15, 1-2:00pm, NVC (Room TBA)

This workshop addresses "clickers" as a teaching tool and covers the basic use of the software program that Baruch uses called Turning Point.
For a complete description of this workshop please click here.

Introduction to Media Services/Classroom Support at Baruch
Wednesday, February 16, 1-2:00pm, NVC 6-160

This workshop introduces you to the many services that Media Resources can provide. For a complete description of this workshop please click here.

Screencasting and Narrated Presentations
Thursday, February 17, 1-2:00pm, NVC 6-165

The first half of the workshop will cover screencasts, digital recordings in real time of everything that is occurring on a computer screen. The second half of the workshop will look at narrated powerpoints, used to record audio narration to your slide presentations. For a complete description of this workshop please click here.

Synchronous/Web Conferencing Tools
Tuesday, February 22, 1-2:00pm, NVC 6-165

This workshop will show how Adobe Connect can be used to conduct live classroom sessions over the web. For a complete description of this workshop please click here.

Blogging and Instructional Technology in the Classroom
Thursday, February 24, 12:30am-2:00pm, 137 E25th St., Room 32
Our roundtable discussions for faculty in Social Sciences and the Humanities offer a great opportunity to hear from Baruch colleagues about the techniques, assignments, and approaches that have worked for them in the classroom. We'll share easy, fun ideas about how to integrate these concepts into your own courses. In this roundtable, we will discuss innovative ways to get students to engage in course materials through blogging and other interactive media. Luke Waltzer, Assistant Director for Educational Technology, will introduce participants to resources available through Blogs@Baruch.

Refreshments will be provided and adjuncts will be paid at the non-teaching adjunct rate. If you would like to attend this roundtable, please RSVP to Lauren Martin at lmartin@gc.cuny.edu.

Introduction to Qualtrics (Survey Tool)
Tuesday, March 1, 1-2:00pm, session will take place online

This workshop is an introduction to Qualtrics, an online survey program that allows the user to create dynamic online surveys. For a complete description of this workshop please click here.

Close Reading and Writing-to-Learn
Great Works Faculty Roundtables, Spring 2011

Tuesday, March 1, 12:45-2:15pm, NVC 14-269
Picking up on our reading strategies roundtable of last semester, we'll take a look at using low stakes writing and write-to-learn practices to deepen students' capacities to produce nuanced interpretations of texts.  What kind of feedback loop can be created between deep reading and informal writing before students are asked to produced formal essays? We'll look at specific activities and assignments and hear from faculty who have experimented with these techniques.

Intermediate Training on Qualtrics
Thursday, March 3, 1-2:00pm, session will take place online

Advanced survey management, creation and analysis are specifically taught in this training. For a complete description of this workshop please click here.

Introduction to Plagiarism Detection Software (Turnitin)
Tuesday, March 8, 1-2:00pm, NVC 8-160

See Feb. 15 listing for more information.

Introduction to iTunes University
Tuesday, March 8, 1-2:00pm, NVC 6-160

This workshop will explore the basics of iTunes University as it used from within Blackboard to provide course content to enrolled students. For a complete description of this workshop please click here.

Blackboard Grade Center and Assignments
Thursday, March 10, 1-2:00pm, NVC 6-165

This hands-on session is designed for instructors, graduate assistants, and staff who have prior experience Blackboard but would like to explore Blackboard’s features in more depth. Additional sessions on Tues., Apr. 12, 1-2:00pm, NVC 6-165 and Tues., May 17, 1-2:00pm, NVC 6-165.
For a complete description of this workshop please click here.

Wireless Projection in the Classroom (for Writing Tablets)
Thursday, March 10, 1-2:00pm, NVC 3-125

Description to follow.

Reviewing Peer Reviews
Great Works Faculty Roundtables, Spring 2011
Wednesday, March 16, 12:45-2:15pm, NVC 14-269
Most professors in writing courses acknowledge the value of peer reviews, but actually trying to smoothly incorporate these activities---into the time-frame of a class session and the process of a given essay---can be quite challenging.  What are the various ways Great Works faculty can bring effective peer reviewing into their courses?  What has worked and what hasn't?  We'll evaluate the benefits and limitations of various types of review forms, compare small group work and one-on-one arrangements, and discuss the use of peer-work for both formal and informal assignments.

Faculty Roundtable in the Social Sciences and Humanities: Small Groups and Peer Review
Wednesday, March 16, 2:30-4:00pm, NVC 14-249 (Sociology/Anthropology conference room)
Roundtable discussions offered by the Bernard L. chwartz Communication Institute provide great opportunities to hear from Baruch colleagues about techniques, assignments, and approaches that have worked for them in the classroom. We'll share easy, fun ideas about how to integrate these concepts into your own courses. In this roundtable, we will discuss innovative ways for students to engage in collaborative work. Such methods enhance the quality of student writing, enrich the classroom experience, and provide a vital diagnostic of how students are grasping the course material.

Refreshments will be provided and adjuncts will be paid at the non-teaching adjunct rate. RSVP: If you would like to attend this roundtable, please email Lauren Martin at lmartin@gc.cuny.edu.

Zicklin Faculty Development Workshop in Online and Hybrid Education
Wednesday, March 23, 9:30am-1:00pm, NVC 14-245
We are pleased to announce the Spring 2011 Zicklin Faculty Development Workshop in Online and Hybrid Education. This program is open to all Zicklin faculty. If you are interested in learning more about online and hybrid teaching, this workshop is for you.

Topics will include the pedagogy of online and hybrid education; blackboard and other online teaching tools; instructional technology resources at Baruch and at the Zicklin School; and a growing set of practical examples of effective online teaching.

This workshop is free, but space is limited and registration is required. Please visit the Eventbrite website to reserve your seat: http://zicklinonlinespring2011.eventbrite.com. For more information, feel free to contact Linda Friedman or Cathi Kelly. We look forward to greeting you on March 23!

Workshop on Learning-Management Systems
Wednesday, March 23, noon-2:00, Schwartz Institute (137 E. 25th St.), Room 323
This workshop led by Jim Livornese (BCTC) and Luke Waltzer (Schwartz Institute) will compare Blogs@Baruch, Blackboard, WebEx, and Adobe Connect. It should be pof interest to all interested in teaching online. RSVP to Elisabeth Gareis at egareis@baruch.cuny.edu

Overview of Teaching with Technology Grants for 2010-2011
Tuesday, March 29, 1-2:00pm, NVC 6-165

In this overview of the submission process for Technology Grants, the presenters will provide highlights of the achievements of the previous round of Teaching with Technology Grants. Additional session on Tues., Apr. 5, 1-2:00pm, NVC 6-165. For a complete description of this workshop please click here.

Overview of Teaching with Technology Grants for 2010-2011
Tuesday, April 5, 1-2:00pm, NVC 6-165

See Mar. 29 listing for more information.

Introduction to VOCAT
Thursday, April 7, 2-3:00pm, NVC 8-160

This workshop will introduce you to the basic features of the VOCAT (Video Oral Communication Assessment Tool) application, designed to help students develop their public speaking skills.


Overview of Electronic Readers ("E-Readers")

Thursday, April 7, 2-3:00pm, NVC 8-160

This workshop will introduce the attendees to iPads and other e-Reader options and how these can be incorporated into teaching. For a complete description of this workshop please click here.


Blackboard Grade Center and Assignments

Tuesday, April 12, 1-2:00pm, NVC 6-165

See Mar. 10 listing for more information.


DAVID KENNEDY
Online/Hybrid Education- L
earning Design: 21st-Century tools for
21st-Century Learning

Tuesday, April 12, 4:00-5:30 pm, Room 763, Newman Conference Center, 7th Floor of the Newman Library Building
This workshop, presented by the Bernard L. Schwartz Communication Institute and BCTC and led by Prof. David M. Kennedy of Lingnan University in Hong Kong, is intended to assist faculty members in developing and/or furthering the knowledge and confidence required to create and use technology-supported learning environments in hybrid or fully online courses. The session will provide examples of how to design fully online and blended learning environments, demonstrate how student-learning activities can be effectively managed online, and address developing student-centered authentic assessment tasks.

RSVP: Meena.Khan@baruch.cuny.edu or 646 312 2065.

Dr. David M. Kennedy is Associate Professor and Director of the Teaching and Learning Centre at Lingnan University in Hong Kong. He has more than 30 years of teaching experience and has published widely on the use of learning technologies in education, including pedagogical frameworks to support their use, problem-based learning, visual and information literacies, and evaluation of curriculum innovations in a diverse number of academic domains. He is also a member of the editorial boards of the Journal of Multimedia and Hypermedia, the International Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education (IJTLHE), and the journal Education as Change.


Responding to Plagiarism

Great Works Faculty Roundtables, Spring 2011
Tuesday, April 12, 2:30-4:00pm, NVC 4-260
Does grading papers have to involve policing students to ensure their words are their own? How do instructors encourage research without inviting intellectual fraud? How can students learn to not only properly cite sources but also use them critically? In the internet age, what are students' understandings of the methods and value of producing academic work? In this collaborative roundtable with the Anthropology department, faculty will share experiences and strategies for encouraging academic integrity among students. We will discuss assignment design, course objectives, and developing critical skills in research.

Careful What You Ask For:  Designing Efficient Writing Assignments for Communication-Intensive Course
Wednesday, April 13, 3:00-4:30pm, 137 E. 25th St., Room 323

Writing assignments are one crucial way to manage the quality of writing instruction in classes that are supposed to teach both content and communication skills. By carefully designing assignments of varying degrees of difficulty—from simple low-stakes in-class writing to the final research essay—and implementing them throughout the semester, writing becomes not simply a mode of evaluation but of learning. When we analyze writing assignments from across the curriculum it often becomes clear that the reason our students are not performing to their fullest capability is partly due to the assignmentsthey are given. The old warning to be “careful what you ask for, because you may end up getting it,” will guide us as we discuss our own writing assignments, balancing and incorporating writing with oral communication, and using the assignments strategically to balance our own workload.

Presented by the Bernard L. Schwartz Communication Institute and led by Dr. Ken Nielsen, Lecturer in the Princeton Writing Program at Princeton University, this hands-on workshop will address best practices in writing assignment design.Participants are encouraged to bring a copy of one of their writing assignments to this workshop.

Tea and refreshments will be served. Adjunct faculty will be paid at the non-teaching rate for their participation.

RSVP by email to hillary.miller@baruch.cuny.edu

Syllabus Design
Great Works Faculty Roundtables, Spring 2011
Tuesday, May 3, 12:45-2:15pm, NVC 14-269
Syllabi, especially for courses like Great Works, are complex documents that must perform several tasks and speak in several registers at once.  Given how difficult it can be to construct a syllabus from scratch, and also given the perhaps greater difficulty of re-vamping a serviceable old stand-by, we'll devote this roundtable to questions of syllabus design.  Using a workshop format in which we look at actual Great Works syllabi, we'll consider theories (a minimalist approach versus a maximalist one, for instance) as well as practice, with a view toward enhancing the documents faculty already have in place.

Blackboard Grade Center and Assignments
Tuesday, May 17, 1-2:00pm, NVC 6-165

See Mar. 10 listing for more information.


SEMINARS IN FALL 2010


Workshops for Faculty and TAs of ACC 2203 (Managerial Accounting)
Tuesday, August 10, 10:00am-1:30pm
This session will include a meeting of all ACC 2203 (Managerial Accounting) faculty and TAs. For the first half of the workshop, McGraw-Hill representative will be present to review features and supplements of the textbook including the online homework manager. Updates of the online system will be reviewed, questions about setting-up quizzes and homework assignments explained, and other book ancillaries will be demonstrated. After the conclusion of the McGraw-Hill presentation, the instructors and TAs will meet to determine the logistics of the two large lecture courses. Discussion will take place about the weighting of various assignments, the need for an in-class mid-term, and the need to have TAs working back to back each hour remain in a single classroom.

Orientations for New Full-Time Members of the Faculty

Wednesday, August 18, 10:00am-12:00pm, Provost's Conference Room
Thursday, August 19, 2:30-4:30pm, Provost's Conference Room


Orientations for New Adjunct Members of the Faculty

Wednesday, August 18, 6:30-8:30 pm, Provost's Conference Room
Monday, August 23, 1:00-3:00 pm, NVC 3-125
Tuesday, August 24, 4:00-6:00 pm, NVC 3-125


Workshops for Faculty and TAs of ACC 2101 (Principles of Accounting)
Friday, August 20, 10am-2pm

This session will include a meeting of all ACC 2010 (Principles of Accounting) faculty and TAs. Pearson representatives will lead the first half of the workshop and review the supplemental textbook tools, specifically the online homework manager. Updates of the online system will be reviewed, questions about setting-up quizzes and homework assignments explained and other book ancillaries demonstrated. For the second part of the workshop, group of instructors and TAs will move to discuss the reordering of some of the coursework; the changes in the oral presentation format/assignment; the use of VOCAT for scoring; and other issues about grades and weighting assignments. BCTC's Kevin Wolff will discuss the logistics needed to condense many Bbsites into a central site for the two large lectures. At the conclusion of the workshop, attendees will proceed to the Schwartz Institute Offices to work with Suzanne Epstein and Thomas Harbison to become more familiar with the VOCAT scoring and reconsider the scoring rubric previously used.

Great Works Orientation (ENG/LTT 2800-2850)
Mon., August 23, 2-4 pm, NVC 7-205 (Great Works Resource Room) This session is designed for members of the faculty new to the teaching of our Great Works courses. It includes a review of the obligations and privileges attendant upon the Communication-Intensive designation of ENG/LTT 2800-2850, an exploration of the opportunities afforded by the Resource Room as a teaching facility, including the Pilgrimage software created for the Great Works program that is available on the computers in 7-205, and an opportunity to ask questions. 

Library and Instructional Technology Orientation for New Full-Time Faculty Members
Tuesday, August 24, 10:00 am-12:00 pm, NVC 8-140

DR. DAVID WILLIAM FOSTER
São Paulo: Latin America’s Premier Global City
The Paul André Feit Memorial Lectures Series
Wednesday, September 8, 1:00-2:00 p.m., NVC 8-210
The Paul André Feit Lecture Series & the Weissman School of Arts and Sciences Global Studies Initiative cordially invite you to a lecture by Dr. David William Foster: “São Paulo: Latin America’s Premier Global City.” David William Foster is a Regents’ Professor of Spanish and Women and Gender Studies at Arizona State University, where he edits Chasqui; revista de literatura latinoamericana. His research focuses on Latin American urban culture with particular reference to gender issues, and he has books on both Mexico City and Buenos Aires. A book on São Paulo is forthcoming with the University Press of Florida. During July 2010, he led an NEH Summer Seminar for College and University Professors on urban culture in Brazil, held in São Paulo.
We gratefully acknowledge the generous support of the Paul André Feit Fund. 
Please click on Feit Lecture Series web page for additional details. For information, contact Prof. Elena Martinéz.

Low-Stakes Writing
Social Sciences and Humanities
Faculty Roundtable
Monday, October 4, 12:30-2:00pm
The Bernard L. Schwartz Communication Institute will offer a Faculty Roundtable for faculty members in the Social Sciences and Humanities on the topic of Low-Stakes Writing. In the course of discussing designing and administering low-stakes writing assignments, we will introduce creative ways of using writing to deepen student engagement with course content, facilitate critical thinking, and generate more productive in-class discussions.
To RSVP for this event, please email Lauren Martin at lmartin@gc.cuny.edu.

"Thereness for Everyone": The Writing Course as Dialogic Community
On Teaching Writing: Workshop One
Thursday, October 7, 12:40-2:00pm, NVC 7-210
Presenting the first in a year-long series of workshops:
This paper will discuss the shape and design of the college writing course, focusing in particular on the use of a theme organization. It will also propose a format to be used in organizing class sessions. In addition, it expatiates on Husserl’s notion of "thereness" and how this applies to establishing a community within the classroom. Finally, the paper argues for the value of teaching a genre of essay called “the imaginative argument,” one that is not only original and creative, but that imagines an audience as it imagines itself into that audience.
Paper presentation by: Frank Cioffi, Baruch College; Response by: Kyle Waugh, Baruch College and the Graduate Center; Debate and replies by: Frank Cioffi and Kyle Waugh as well as further discussion with the audience.

Designing Formal Assignments
Social Sciences and Humanities Faculty Roundtable
Tuesday, October 19
, 12:30-2:00pm, NVC 4-249
The Bernard L. Schwartz Communication Institute is pleased to announce our second faculty roundtable in the social sciences and humanities. How do we effectively convey to our students what it is we want from them? Sociology professor Susan Chambré will help facilitate a discussion about the successes and challenges of designing writing assignments. During this hands-on roundtable, we will critique and troubleshoot actual assignments for clarity and effectiveness. Participants are encouraged to bring examples of their own assignments to be “workshoppped” as a group.
Please RSVP to Lauren Martin at lmartin@gc.cuny.edu.

Teaching Online: Two Open Forums
Tuesday, October 19, 3:00-5:00pm, NVC 3-150
Wednesday, October 20, 10:30am-12:30pm, NVC 6-119

With increased interest in teaching online—and an expanding number of courses at Baruch (many more elsewhere) that mix online instruction with the traditional face-to-face variety—the time seems more than ripe to meet to discuss the wide range of issues that arise, none more important than whether online (or “hybrid” or "blended”) courses facilitate learning. 

At Baruch, two reports about online pedagogy were distributed in the past few months, one last May from a college-wide ad hoc committee led by Gary Hentzi, Associate Dean of the Weissman School, and one by the members of a Zicklin summer seminar led by Linda Friedman, Associate Dean of the Zicklin School. Both reports are available under “Online courses” in the Faculty Handbook: http://www.baruch.cuny.edu/facultyhandbook/topics.htm

Deans Friedman, Hentzi, and Dennis Slavin, Associate Provost and Assistant Vice President will host two open forums to discuss issues raised by their two reports and anything else related to online pedagogy on Tuesday (10/19) and Wednesday (10/20). Please RSVP to Vanessa Cano know whether you plan to attend one of the forums (and which): Vanessa.Cano@baruch.cuny.edu or 646-660-6500.

Inside the Writing Class (Miciah Hussey)
On Teaching Writing: Workshop Two
Tuesday, November 2, 10:30am-12:00pm, NVC 7-210
So many of my classes, both at the undergraduate and graduate level, followed a teacher-centered model, in which the goal was simply for the teacher to transmit his or her knowledge. In their essays and exams, students proved they had received this wisdom. While this sounds on the surface logical and even somewhat appealing, it can’t be recommended that teachers of writing—-instructors, lecturers, professors—-use such a format. In fact, the contention here is that such a format is counterproductive in a writing class, whose main purpose, is to provide students with a voice, to teach them a skill, and to equip them with the independent ability to generate lucid, informed, correct, lively, analytical, and imaginative prose of their own. It’s a class that needs to be far more student- than professor-centered. It’s a class that needs to be taught in a rather special way. The paper outlines something of what that consists of.
Paper presentation by: Frank Cioffi, Baruch College
Response by: Miciah Hussey, Baruch College and the Graduate Center
Debate, replies by Cioffi and Hussey, and further discussion with audience

The Uses and Abuses of the "Freewrite" (Bradley Lubin)
On Teaching Writing: Workshop Three
Friday, November 12, 10:00-11:30am, NVC 7-210
Since the 1973 publication of Writing without Teachers, Peter Elbow’s writing pedagogy, based on the "freewrite," has slowly made its way through American education, from grade school to post-graduate levels. While some critics have labeled this technique "new money for old rope," Frank Cioffi disagrees: as something of a witness to this trend, as well as a person working within it, he will share his ideas about how the freewrite can be used effectively—and how it can be misused.
Paper presentation by: Frank Cioffi, Baruch College
Response by: Bradley Lubin, CUNY Graduate Center and Baruch College

Microsoft Office Upgrade
Office 2010 Training Workshops for Faculty
In-person training sessions offered for 5-week period starting Monday, November 15 in all 3 main campus buildings
Baruch College has begun upgrading Microsoft Office on faculty and staff computers to Office 2010, including Word, Excel, Outlook, and PowerPoint. The upgrade has already been completed for the computers in the classrooms and student labs. The Baruch Computing & Technology Center (BCTC) is working with each department to schedule its upgrade. BCTC's Office 2010 Web page provides access to the following resources to help faculty and staff with the upgrade process:

  • In-Person Training: Register for a brief workshop on how to use Office 2010. For a five-week period workshops are being offered in all 3 of the main campus buildings.
  • Web-Based Tutorials and Guides: Learn at your own pace at home or at work.
  • FAQ: Review answers to frequently asked questions about Office 2010.

Home Use: See how to download a free copy of Office 2010 for your home computer.
If you have any questions, contact the BCTC Help Desk at 646-312-1010 or helpdesk@baruch.cuny.edu.

Commenting On and Grading Student Writing
Social Sciences and Humanities Faculty Roundtable

Monday, November 15, 12:30-2:00pm
Details to follow.

RUBEN GALLO (Princeton University)
Freud's Mexico: Into the Wilds of Psychoanalysis
The Paul André Feit Memorial Lectures Series
Thursday, November 18, 6:00 pm, NVC 8-210
Join the Dept. of Mod. Languages and Comparative Literatures for a lecture sponsored by the Paul A. Feit Memorial Fund. Prof. Gallo will discuss his recent book Freud’s Mexico (MIT Press). Freud's Mexico is a completely unexpected contribution to Freud studies. Gallo reveals Freud’s previously undisclosed connections to a culture and a psychoanalytic tradition not often associated with him. Freud found a receptive audience among Mexican intellectuals, read Mexican books, collected Mexican antiquities, and dreamed Mexican dreams; his writings bear the traces of a longstanding fascination with the country. In the Mexico of the 1920s and 1930s, Freud made an impact not only among psychiatrists but also in literary, artistic, and political circles. Gallo discovers a "motley crew" of Freud’s readers who devised some of the most original, elaborate, and influential applications of psychoanalytic theory anywhere in the world: the poet Salvador Novo, a gay dandy who used Freud to vindicate marginal sexual identities; the conservative philosopher Samuel Ramos, who diagnosed the collective neuroses afflicting his country; the cosmopolitan poet Octavio Paz, who launched a psychoanalytic inquiry into the origins of Mexican history; and Gregorio Lemercier, a Benedictine monk who put his entire monastery into psychoanalysis. 

On Grading My Professors' Grading: The Final Comment as Genre (Sara Remedios)
On Teaching Writing: Workshop Four
Thursday, November 18, 12:30-2:00pm, NVC 7-210
Here we look at an array of "final comments"—those remarks that are appended to the end of a paper and that more or less "explain," "justify," "flesh out," "soften," or otherwise contextualize the grade. Looking over one's own written work from eleven years in college, professors did a variety of things in their final comments: Praise, Scold, Correct, Describe/summarize, Question, Debate, Joke, Suggest improvements, Compare to work of other students, Comment on content, Offer alternative ideas, Give meta-commentary, Evaluate personality and capability of writer. Given this wide array of possibilities, and recalling personal responses to getting back all those papers written years ago, it seems that students want more than just a judgment of their work (though they do want that, in the form of a high grade, usually). They want, in addition, some directions on how to improve, how to write better the next time around, how to think more clearly.  But it is proposed that students want still more: they want to have been treated as a person, as a personality in progress, as a mind becoming, not just as some anonymous entity frozen in time and represented by an already-composed piece of writing that is now part of their past. And they want a human connection, too. They want some evidence that the paper they wrote, spent time on, and labored over, made some impact on another consciousness—in fact on the consciousness of someone the society has deemed not just important, but also smart: the professor.
Paper presentation by: Frank Cioffi, Baruch College
Response by: Sara Remedios, CUNY Graduate Center and Baruch College


ASWATH DAMODARAN
Teaching: Art or Science?
Master Teacher Series
Tuesday, November 23, 12:45-2:30 pm, NVC 12-150
Aswath Damodaran, Professor of Finance at NYU’s Stern School of Business will return to Baruch to present on his favorite topic, Teaching: Art or Science. Damodaran has presented here twice before to great acclaim. He teaches very large classes at NYU, but many of his ideas and suggestions are equally applicable to much smaller classes. Damodaran’s skill and enthusiasm in the classroom have garnered him the Schools of Business Excellence in Teaching Award in 1988, the Distinguished Teaching award from NYU in 1990, and he has been voted "Professor of the Year" by the graduating MBA class five times during his career at NYU.
RSVP to Vanessa Cano: Vanessa.Cano@baruch.cuny.edu  or  646-660-6517.


Topic: Using Blogs in Your Classroom (Luke Waltzer & Suzanne Epstein, Schwartz Communication Institute)
Communication Studies Colloquium Series
Wednesday, December 1, 12:30 to 2pm, VC 8-210
Baruch faculty welcome by RSVP only to caryn.medved@baruch.cuny.edu (seats limited to 25).

CIC: What's Working, and What's Next?
Theatre 1041C Faculty Lunch and Roundtable
Thursday, December 2, 12:30pm (lunch); 1-2:00pm (discussion), 137 E. 25th St., Room 323
Please join your Schwartz Institute Communications Fellows, Hillary Miller, Linell Ajello, and Talia Argondezzi, for a lunch and roundtable discussion: “CIC: What’s Working, and What’s Next?” We’ll be sharing ideas submitted by THE1041C Instructors, exploring what the “Communication Intensive” designation can mean for the course, reflecting on your best practices, and collecting suggestions for what’s next in our support of this course. Lunch Will Be Provided! Adjunct faculty will be compensated for their time at the non-teaching adjunct rate. Please click here to view the official flier.
RSVP by November 19 so we will know how much food to order: Hillary.Miller@baruch.cuny.edu.

DR. GINETTA CANDELARIO (Smith College)
Black Behind the Ears: Dominican Racial Identity from Museums to Beauty Shops
The Paul André Feit Memorial Lectures Series
Thursday, December 2, 12:45-1:45 p.m., NVC 8-155

The Paul André Feit Lecture Series at Baruch College presents: Dr. Ginetta Candelario, Sociologist and Associate Professor at Smith College, who will lecture on Dominican racial identity. Co-sponsored by Señoritas Latinas Unidas.
Please click on Feit Lecture Series web page for additional details. For information, contact Prof. Elena Martinéz.

DR. GREG CARR (Howard University)
What is Black Studies?

The 15th Annual Dr. Donald H. Smith Distinguished Lecture of Baruch College
Monday, December 6, 6:00 p.m. (refreshments served at 5pm), 151 E. 25th St., 7th floor conference room
What is Black Studies? A neglected discipline in a forgotten corner of academia or the pivotal discourse in an ever more diverse and multicultural American now captained by a more dynamic young Black president? What is Black Studies? The key to reconciling the United States with its shameful history or an anachronism in a great nation that has at last come to grips with its past and forged what is truly a post-racial society? Dr. Greg Carr, Chair of African American Studies at Howard University. will tackle these questions. To find out more about Dr. Carr, watch: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kpjWd25NjDI&feature=related

The Smith Distinguished Lecture, now in its 15th year, features scholars and practitioners of education, politics, law, history, and race. Further information may be obtained from Prof. Arthur Lewin at: Arthur.Lewin@baruch.cuny.edu or 646-312-4443.

Future of the Writing Course (Diana Meckley)
On Teaching Writing: Workshop Five
Tuesday, December 7, 10:30am-12:15pm, NVC 7-210
The "singularity" has already happened. Let us start with the body, circa 2010 A.C.E., and ask how it differs from that of 1990 or 1970 or 1920. Most obvious is the following: since 1920 or so, people have routinely and comfortably affixed to their bodies a small machine—a wristwatch—so they could easily check the time. Now, a new machine has emerged as an extension of the human: the hand-held "device" that accompanies people almost everywhere they go, and that can give them access to emails, TV, movies, the Internet, family photos, games, a telephone, an alarm clock, and lots more. This device, strapped to one’s body, carried in one’s hand, at quick, easy access during most hours of the day, has assumed a companionate presence for so many people living in the post-industrial world that we in some genuine sense find ourselves witness to a major evolutionary change in homo sapiensHomo sapiens sapiens aparatis has emerged: the human being carrying an external, ancillary brain. As college strives to promulgate and keep alive the culture of the past, as reflected variously in various academic fields, the tradition of knowledge, and the conventions of communication, the newly evolved human beings who make up our student body acquiesce to but often resist this indoctrination. This workshop will explore what a college writing course can and should do when its audience consists of this newly evolved species. Presentations will include: "Porridge" by Frank Cioffi, Baruch College; response by Diana Meckley, Queens College and City University Graduate Center; and audience input!

[Note: This will be a live, in-person workshop, not a “webinar” or a virtual experience. Please feel free to bring a brown bag lunch and your favorite beverage!]

PEMA BHUM
The Tibetan Language Today: Issues and Challenges

Saturday, December 11, 1:00-2:00pm, NVC 6-210
The Department of Modern Languages & The American Society of Geolinguistics present Pema Bhum, Director, Latse Library, Trace Foundation, NY, who will speak on The Tibetan Language Today: Issues and Challenges. Saturday, December 11, 1:00 pm in NVC 6-210 Conference Room -- enter on Lexington Avenue @ 24th Street. Photo ID required. Please call 646-312-4220 for more information or visit the CUNY Events webpage.