The Baruch College Faculty Handbook

Faculty Development Seminars 2008-2009

Last updated on 5/14/2010

Support for many of these seminars is provided in part by the Baruch College Fund. Also see the archived series for 2002-2003, 2003-2004, 2004-2005, 2005-2006, 2006-2007, and 2007-2008. For Research Without Borders (presentations about their research by members of the Baruch faculty and invited guests), go here.

Please feel free to send ideas for seminars to
Associate Provost Dennis Slavin.

SEMINARS IN FALL 2008

Workshops for Instructors and TAs of Large Lecture Sections
Tuesday, July 29, 11:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m., NVC 13-215
This session will include a general overview of the teaching responsibilities and support services available to the TAs for ACC 2101 and 2203. The groups will be broken out and will meet with publisher representatives to learn about the online homework modules of the texts. Time will be allocated for each instructor to meet with his/her TAs and discuss the format of the course.

Little Brown Handbook Workshops
Tuesday, August 19, 10 a.m.-12 p.m.
Thursday, August 21, 2-4 p.m.
Thursday, September 18, 12:30-2:30 p.m.
The publisher of the college’s new writing handbook, Pearson Higher Education, is hosting a workshop for all teaching faculty in the English Department. Please join our Pearson campus Representative for a presentation and training on the resources to which we have access with The Little Brown Handbook, specifically MyCompLab (www.mycomplab.com). Participants will be paid at the 60% rate and should come away with helpful ideas for online support. Please RSVP to nichole.stanford@baruch.cuny.edu for one of the dates/times listed above.

Orientation for New Faculty I
Wednesday, Aug. 20, 9:30 a.m.-5:00 p.m., NVC 14-270
The focus will be on teaching, and the afternoon will feature a session
led by Mel Silberman, author of Teaching Actively (Allyn & Bacon, 2005). We will conclude with a reception in the Writing Center.

Orientation for New Faculty II
Wednesday, Aug. 20, 10:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m.
The morning will be devoted to a discussion in NVC 10-150 of our library's resources and of technological issues, including
classroom and other teaching technologies. This will be followed by lunch and afternoon discussion with the academic deans:
David Birdsell, School of Public Affairs (Location TBA)
John Elliott, Zicklin School of Business (NVC 13-215)
Jeffrey Peck, Weissman School of Arts and Sciences (151 E. 25th
Street, Room 763).

Workshops for Instructors and TAs of Large Lecture Sections
The same program will be presented twice:
Monday, Sept. 15, 12:30-2:00 p.m., NVC 13-263
Tuesday, Sept. 16, 12:30-2:00 p.m., NVC 13-263

Meetings will be held with instructors of the large lecture economics courses and their TAs. In addition, representatives from the book publishers will be on hand to answer questions about the online products and support available for student queries. The meetings are scheduled to clarify the responsibilities of the instructors and the TAs and to describe the support services available for them and their students. (This faculty development workshop will be repeated in January 2009 in preparation for the spring 2009 semester. The date has not been selected yet.)

Orientation for New Faculty III
Friday, Sept. 26, 9:00 a.m.-11:30 p.m., NVC 14-285
The Provost’s office will host a discussion of personnel issues, including procedures related to reappointment, tenure, and promotion. The later part of the morning will include discussion of issues of special interest to our international faculty members and presentations from Dean of Faculty Staff Relations John Dugan and our union representatives.

Sociology/Anthropology Faculty Development Workshop

Low Stakes Writing
Tuesday, Oct. 7, 12:30-2:00 p.m., Soc./Anthro. Conference Room
Wednesday, Oct. 8, 12:30-2:00 p.m., Soc./Anthro. Conference Room

This workshop presents a variety of strategies to engage students in course content through ungraded written excesses. These include in class assignments as well as blogs and journaling. Refreshments will be provided and adjuncts will be compensated for their time at the non teaching adjunct rate.

Great Works Faculty Workshops
Write-to-Learn Practices in the Great Works Classroom
Friday, Oct. 10, 2:30-4 p.m., NVC 14-269
In this session, Great Works faculty will discuss the possibilities of using writing-to-learn practices (free writing, journals, logs, response papers, mini-essays, letters and others) in the Great Works classroom. We’ll also take a look at these strategies in the context of the formalized “learning goals” of Great Works to see how small-scale/low-stakes writing work relates to the broadest goals of Great Works courses.

Master Teacher Series: JOHN BEAN
From Novice to Expert: Designing Writing Assignments to Teach Disciplinary Ways of Thinking and Arguing

The same program will be presented twice:
Tuesday, Oct. 14, 10:30 a.m.-noon, 151 East 25th Street, Room 763
Tuesday, Oct. 14, 1-2:30 p.m., 151 East 25th Street, Room 763
Bean’s book Engaging Ideas: The Professor’s Guide to Writing, Critical Thinking, and Active Learning in the Classroom (Jossey-Bass, 1996) has been extremely well received by many members of our faculty as well as by a national audience. His premise: “Integrating writing and other critical thinking activities into a course increases students’ learning while teaching them thinking skills for posing questions, proposing hypotheses, gathering and analyzing data, and making arguments.” In this discussion, Bean, a professor of English at Seattle University, will draw upon the arsenal of suggestions presented in Engaging Ideas.
RSVP to Juan Pagan juan.pagan@baruch.cuny.edu or 646-660-6500

English Department Faculty Development Workshop
What Makes for Good Student Writing?
Thursday, Oct. 16, 9:45 a.m. - 1 p.m., NVC 14-269 (Sean O'Toole & Frank Cioffi, facilitators)
The workshop will focus on developing a common language for discussing and evaluating writing in the classroom. What are the characteristics of the best academic writing in any and all fields? How can we enable students to transcend the localness of any particular assignment or draft, and transfer their learning to other writing situations? We’ll approach these questions first by developing a writing lexicon of our own. We’ll work with Gordon Harvey’s “Elements of the Academic Essay” and consider possible modifications or alternatives. In light of this discussion, we’ll then workshop a recent student paper, looking closely at various moments in the text and modeling ways to get students to do the same. If time permits, we might consider the question of grades and grading rubrics. All inquiries can be directed to Frank Cioffi at: frank.cioffi@baruch.cuny.edu
RSVP to Juan Pagan at juan.pagan@baruch.cuny.edu or 646-660-6500

Workshops for Learning Goal Assessment
Tuesday, Oct. 21
A meeting will be held with faculty working on the assessment of the technology learning goal and with full-time faculty teaching MGT 3121. The faculty have developed and will deliver data for the preliminary assessment. The goal is to share the data we receive and to discuss the assignment, its goals, and its results.

International Faculty Development Workshops
Leading Effective Classroom Discussions
The same workshop will be given on two dates:
Wed., Oct. 22, 12:30-2 p.m., NVC 8-213 (Elisabeth Gareis, facilitator)
Thurs., Oct. 23, 12:30-2 p.m., NVC 8-213 (Denise Patrick, facilitator)
Baruch College offers an International Faculty Development Program for faculty members whose native language/dialect is not American English. In this workshop, topics will include: how to socialize students for class discussion; how to encourage student preparation; how to ask effective questions, negotiate meaning, and check for comprehension; how to ensure equal participation; and how to teach students to facilitate small-group discussions themselves.
To sign up for either workshop, please email Elisabeth Gareis at egareis@baruch.cuny.edu

Workshops for Instructors and TAs of Large Lecture Sections
Friday, Oct. 24, 2:30 p.m., Annex 323, Suzanne Epstein (facilitator)
A meeting will be held by the Schwartz Communication Institute (Suzanne Epstein) and the TAs teaching the Accounting 2101 recitations. The TAs will review and refocus the rubric that will be used for the oral communication assignment for ACC 2101. TAs will be introduced to the Vocat scoring system.

Master Teacher Series: EDWARD DECI
Facilitating Motivation and Psychological Well-Being in Universities
The same program will be presented twice:
Thursday, Oct. 30, 10:30 a.m.-noon, NVC 14-270
Thursday, Oct. 30, 1-2:30 p.m., NVC 14-270
Edward Deci, professor of psychology and Gowen Professor in the Social Sciences at the University of Rochester, is a founder of Self-Determination Theory (SDT), one of today’s most influential motivational theories. He writes of his work: “I examine a variety of issues in human motivation, isolating basic processes and testing their application to education, health care, parenting, mental health, and work organizations in the U.S. and across cultures. Using both laboratory and field methods, my work focuses primarily on the nature and development of self-determination.”
RSVP to Juan Pagan juan.pagan@baruch.cuny.edu or 646-660-6500

Sociology/Anthropology Faculty Development Workshop
Small Groups and Peer Review
Monday, Nov. 3, 12:30-2:00 p.m., Soc./Anthro. Conference Room
Tuesday, Nov. 4, 12:30-2:00 p.m., Soc./Anthro. Conference Room
This workshop presents a variety of strategies to engage students in course content through the use of small groups. Building on some of the ideas presented in the Low Stakes Writing workshop, this session looks at how to use such exercise to stimulate class discussion and raise critical questions. The workshop also covers methods of implementing peer review in the classroom to help students develop better reading and editing skills. Refreshments will be provided and adjuncts will be compensated for their time at the non-teaching adjunct rate.

Great Works Faculty Workshops
Focus on a single Great Works text
Wednesday, Nov. 5, 3-4:30 p.m., NVC 14-269
In this session we’ll share ideas for tackling and teaching a single, and particularly difficult, Great Works text. We'll discuss innovative strategies for meeting student resistance, finding points of entry in low-stakes writing, and creating successful essay assignments.

International Faculty Development Workshops
Improving Your Course Evaluations
The same workshop will be given on November 12 (see below)
Thurs., Nov. 6, 12:30-2 p.m., NVC 8-213 (Denise Patrick, facilitator)
This workshop focuses on course evaluation criteria. Special attention will be paid  to course organization, learning goals, class environment, oral and written communication skills, and intellectual challenge. The pedagogical background for each item will be discussed and tips provided on how analysis of the criteria can improve one's teaching.
To sign up for this workshop, please email Elisabeth Gareis at egareis@baruch.cuny.edu

Master Teacher Series: MARTINA BODE and MARY SCHULLER
“Clickers” in Classes
The same program will be presented twice:
Mon., Nov. 10, 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m., 151 East 25th Street, Room 763
Mon., Nov. 10, 1:30-3 p.m., 151 East 25th Street, Room 763

Would you like to know how well your students can apply course material—as you are presenting it to them? Martina Bode, senior lecturer of mathematics at Northwestern University, and Mary Schuller, Northwestern’s manager of faculty support services, demonstrate how electronic response systems can stimulate student engagement and provide immediate feedback about what they are truly learning.
RSVP to Juan Pagan juan.pagan@baruch.cuny.edu or 646-660-6500.

IRB Workshop
Tuesday, November 11, 12:30 - 2:00 p.m., NVC 14-266
Federal law mandates that researchers working with human subjects acquire approval of an institutional review board (IRB), and professional ethics require protection of research participants. The Baruch College IRB invites all faculty members and doctoral students who are planning to submit an IRB application during the next few months to a workshop designed to help researchers understand the IRB process at Baruch College and to provide guidance in navigating the process smoothly and efficiently. Plenty of time will be available for your questions.
RSVP to Keisha.Peterson@baruch.cuny.edu by November 7.
Questions? Please contact Keisha Peterson or the IRB’s chair Prof. Hannah Rothstein Hannah.Rothstein@baruch.cuny.edu.

International Faculty Development Workshop
Improving Your Course Evaluations
For a description of this workshop, see November 6
Wednesday, Nov. 12, 12:30-2 p.m., NVC 8-213 (Elisabeth Gareis, facilitator)

To sign up for this workshop, please email Elisabeth Gareis at egareis@baruch.cuny.edu

Master Teacher Series: RICHARD LIGHT
Strengthening Student Success: Six Suggestions
Wednesday, Nov. 19, 10 am-noon, NVC 14-250
Richard Light is Walter H. Gale Professor of Education of the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. His award-winning book, Making the Most of College (Harvard, 2001), which is based on 10 years of student interviews, will serve as a springboard for discussion of effective, organized teaching, focused on connecting abstract academic ideas to more practical, quotidian thoughts.
RSVP to Juan Pagan juan.pagan@baruch.cuny.edu or 646-660-6500

Academic Integrity Workshop: SARAH RYAN
When It’s About Skills, Not Integrity: Assessing and Remedying Skill
Deficiencies Related to Common Academic Integrity Issues

Tuesday, Dec. 2, Time 10:00-11:30 a.m., NVC 14-269
Violations of academic integrity are more often related to skill deficiencies than to ethical/moral deficiencies. Learn how to assess what your students know about citing sources, researching ethically, and more. Then, try some of the handy fixes offered in this workshop to help your students begin to patch their knowledge gaps. You will walk away with a workbook filled with activities designed to assist your students in developing a deeper understanding of what academic integrity entails and how it can be pursued ethically in higher education.
RSVP to Juan Pagan juan.pagan@baruch.cuny.edu or 646-660-6500

Master Teacher Series: CHARLIE CANNON
Thinking Together: Collaboration and Engagement
The same program will be presented twice:
Tuesday, Dec. 2, 12:30-2 p.m., NVC 14-270
Tuesday, Dec. 2, 3-4:30 p.m., NVC 14-270

Charlie Cannon is a faculty member of the Rhode Island School of Design (RISD) and co-founder of LOCAL Architecture Research Design. He draws on his experience to discuss how to use real, complex problems to engage students, and engage them to work together, to seek solutions that are creative and indeed innovative. His methods for creating collaboration across disciplines have been featured in the Chronicle of Higher Education. At RISD Cannon has twice been nominated for the prestigious Frazier Teaching Award.
RSVP to Juan Pagan juan.pagan@baruch.cuny.edu or 646-660-6500

Sociology/Anthropology Faculty Development Workshop
Commenting on Student Writing
Tuesday, Dec. 2, 12:30-2:00 p.m., Soc./Anthro. Conference Room
Wednesday, Dec. 3, 12:30-2:00 p.m., Soc./Anthro. Conference Room

This workshop explores the most effective methods for commenting on student writing, emphasizing ways in which faculty can coach revision and help further develop students' critical thinking skills. We explore styles of commenting as well as effective ways of managing time spent grading. Refreshments will be provided and adjuncts will be compensated for their time at the non-teaching adjunct rate.

Great Works Faculty Workshops
Blog Possibilities for Great Works
Wednesday Dec. 10, 3-4:30 p.m., NVC 14-269
Following up on last semester’s session on integrating technology into the Great Works classroom, we’ll hear from faculty who have incorporated blogs into their Great Works teaching and learn about the practices and strategies they’ve developed. We’ll also review the technology, set-up, and conceptual underpinning of blogs for those who might want to give blogging a try.