The Baruch College Faculty Handbook

Faculty Development Seminars for 2007-2008

Last updated on July 9, 2008

Support for many of these seminars is provided in part by the Baruch College Fund and the Joseph Drown Foundation. The sessions below are listed chronologically. Also see the archived Faculty Seminar Series for 2002-2003, 2003-2004, 2004-2005, 2005-2006 and 2006-2007.

Please feel free to send ideas for seminars to

Associate Provost Dennis Slavin.

SEMINARS IN SPRING 2008

Workshop for Users of The Little, Brown Handbook
Thursday, January 24, 2008, 9:30-11:00 a.m., NVC 7-210; 7-205
Computer specialists from Pearson Longman will conduct a hands-on workshop for faculty who want to use the web supplements to The Little, Brown Handbook. Participants will be assisted in enrolling in Longman's electronic MyCompLab and setting up their course sites in preparation for the coming semester. For more information contact Paula Berggren at Paula_Berggren@baruch.cuny.edu

Workshops for Instructors of English: FOR 2100T/2150T FACULTY
Evaluation of the Intersection of Course Goals, Course Syllabi, and Grading Principles
Thursday, January 24, 1:00-3:00 p.m., NVC 7-239

Participants will discuss the learning objectives and writing goals of English 2100T and 2150T as they apply to the special needs of speakers of other languages;  they will share and evaluate the writing activities, assignments and different types of literature they have found effective.  Grading rubrics and approaches used in various situations will be presented and discussed. For more information contact Ellen Block at Ellen_Block@baruch.cuny.edu

U.S.-Europe Seminar
Religion and Politics: Is Islam a Barrier to Democracy?
Monday, February 11, 2008, 6:00-8:00 p.m., NVC 14-270
The U.S.-Europe Seminar at Baruch College presents a roundtable discussion that will inaugurate a new series on Religion and Politics. The roundtable will feature:
Steven A. Cook (Douglas Dillon Fellow, Council of Foreign Relations), author of Ruling But Not Governing: The Military and Political Development in Egypt, Algeria, and Turkey (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2007).
Dov Waxman (Baruch College, Political Science), author of The Pursuit of Peace and the Crisis of Israeli Identity (Palgrave Macmillan, 2006).
Wine and cheese will be served at 5:30. For further information contact John Brenkman, Director, U.S.-Europe Seminar at Baruch College at john_brenkman@baruch.cuny.edu or 646-312-3921.
The U.S.-Europe Seminar at Baruch College is sponsored by the Weissman School of Arts and Sciences.

Workshops for Instructors of English: FOR 2100T/2150T FACULTY
Cultural Issues in Reading
Thursday, February 14, 2008, 12:30-2:30 p.m., NVC 7-239

Participants will discuss the problems speakers of other languages experience when reading various genre of literature;  they will share and evaluate specific approaches they have found effective and specific problems students have experiences.  An important component of this workshop is the development of a core of resources that have proven useful for the teaching of writing and literature with this population and which can serve as models for the future. For more information contact Ellen Block at Ellen_Block@baruch.cuny.edu

Master Teacher Series
Saundra McGuire     
Learning Styles and Teaching Students how to Learn

The same workshop will be presented twice.
Monday, February 25, 10:30 am-12 pm, NVC 14-250
Monday, February 25, 1:00-2:30 pm, NVC 14-250

A recipient of multiple teaching awards, Dr. McGuire visits from Louisiana State University where she is Director of the Center for Academic Success and Associate Dean of University College. Among her passionate interests is techniques which facilitate valuable communication and learning.
RSVP to Juan Pagan at Juan_Pagan@baruch.cuny.edu or 646-660-6500

Click here to view a video of Prof. McGuire's presentation.

International Faculty Development Workshops
Evaluating Individual and Group Presentations
The workshop will be given on two dates.
Wednesday, February 27, 2008, 12:30-2:00 p.m., NVC 8-213
Thursday, February 28, 2008, 12:30-2:00 p.m., NVC 8-213

International faculty members* are invited to the following workshop on how to evaluate oral presentations. Topics include: creating evaluation checklists (rubrics), monitoring equal participation and dynamics in group projects, peer evaluation techniques, grading oral presentations, weighing content versus delivery, common verbal and nonverbal delivery challenges, online and video resources on effective presentations, and referring students to support services.
Please confirm your attendance by e-mail with your date of selection to Prof. Elisabeth Gareis at egareis@baruch.cuny.edu by February 20.
*Members of the faculty who would be interested in a similar faculty development event that would not be designed specifically for international faculty are invited to inform Prof. Gareis of their interest.

Faculty Book Club
Discussing The Future of Academic Freedom
See below for dates & times, NVC 8-213

This semester's book club selection is Louis Menand (ed.), The Future of Academic Freedom (University of Chicago Press, 1998). Prof. Menand will be the keynote speaker on May 2, 2008, at the 4th Annual CUNY General Education Conference to be held at Baruch College. Those members of the faculty who had signed by January 10, 2008, will be provided with free copies and are invited to attend any of the several sessions listed below. The discussions will be facilitated alternately by Elisabeth Gareis and Denise Patrick of the Communication Studies Department. Refreshments will be served at all meetings.
Please sign up for one of the meetings by March 1st by sending an e-mail to Elisabeth Gareis at egareis@baruch.cuny.edu.
Tuesday, March 25, 3:30-5:00 p.m., NVC 8-213 (Denise)
Wednesday, April 2, 2:00-3:30 p.m., NVC 8-213 (Elisabeth)
Thursday, April 10, 12:30-2:00 p.m., NVC 8-213 (Denise)
Monday, April 14, 12:30-2:00 p.m., NVC 8-213 (Elisabeth)

Workshops for Instructors of English: FOR 2100T/2150T FACULTY
Group Assessment of Midsemester Papers
Friday, March 14, 2008, 11:00 a.m.-2:00 p.m., NVC 7-239
Participants will evaluate a selection of papers written by 2100T/2150T students in class in the sixth week of the semester.  An important component of this workshop is the development of a common set of expectations and grading principles to be used in 2150T. For more information contact Ellen Block at Ellen_Block@baruch.cuny.edu

Faculty Book Club
Discussing The Future of Academic Freedom
Tuesday, March 25, 3:30-5:00 p.m., NVC 8-213
Denise Patrick will facilitate this is the first book club meeting for this semester's selection, Louis Menand (ed.), The Future of Academic Freedom (University of Chicago Press, 1998). Please see above for further information and RSVP details.

Master Teacher Series - Ken Bain
What Do the Best College Teachers Do?
Monday, March 31, 11:30 a.m.-1:00 p.m., NVC 14-250
Baruch welcomes back a regular speaker in our Master Teacher Series. Bain's award-winning book, What the Best College Teachers Do (Harvard, 2004), will serve as a springing-off point as he reminds us that the best teaching is about deep learning.
RSVP to Juan Pagan at Juan_Pagan@baruch.cuny.edu or 646-660-6500

Click here to view a video of Ken Bain's presentation.

Workshops for Instructors of Mathematics
Tuesday, April 1, 12:45 pm, location TBA
Before speaking in the Master Teacher Series, Prof. Donald Saari, who teaches calculus (among other things) at UC, Irvine, will meet with math instructors. Lunch will be served. More information regarding this event will follow.
Math department faculty please RSVP to Elizabeth Albert by November 1, 2007 at Elizabeth_Albert@baruch.cuny.edu.

Master Teacher Series - Donald Saari
Is there a New Isaac Newton in My Class?
Tuesday, April 1, 3:00-4:30 p.m., H-763
"What does this have to do with me?" is often written on students' faces. Saari, Distinguished Professor of Mathematics and Economics at the University of California, Irvine, will address the disconnect that arises when what is discussed in the classroom seems to have little connection with the real world. He reveals how even the smallest detail may illuminate larger concepts.
RSVP to Juan Pagan at Juan_Pagan@baruch.cuny.edu or 646-660-6500

Click here to view a video of Prof. Saari's presentation.

Faculty Book Club
Discussing The Future of Academic Freedom
Wednesday, April 2, 2:00-3:30 p.m., NVC 8-213
Elisabeth Gareis will facilitate this meeting on this semester's book selection, Louis Menand (ed.), The Future of Academic Freedom (University of Chicago Press, 1998). Please see above for further information and RSVP details.

Great Works Faculty Development Session
Using the Little Brown Handbook to Enhance Communication-Intensive Learning
Thursday, April 3, 12:30 - 2:00 p.m.
How can we use the newly-adopted Little, Brown Handbook to help our students better communicate their ideas in written assignments? Please join us to learn more, and to share your techniques and exchange ideas with other members of the faculty.
Lunch will be provided If you would like to register, or have any questions, please contact jody _rosen@baruch.cuny.edu.  To complete your registration, you must receive a confirmation e-mail.  Space is limited, but we will try to accommodate all who are interested in participating. 

Workshop for Teachers of Writing
Examining Issues of Crucial Importance
Tuesday, April 8, 12:30-3:30 p.m., PCR
Organized by Frank Cioffi, the workshop hopes to reach all faculty who teach writing at Baruch. This workshop will examine issues of critical significance to teachers of writing including using drafts, employing electronic grading, and educating students about avoiding plagiarism. To investigate such topics in further detail, Cheryl Smith will focus on working with the draft and techniques for responding to student writing. Gerry Dalgish will address electronic-grading and anti-plagiarism tools, using faculty interest to guide discussions.

Faculty Book Club
Discussing The Future of Academic Freedom
Thursday, April 10, 12:30-2:00 p.m., NVC 8-213
Denise Patrick will facilitate this meeting on this semester's book selection, Louis Menand (ed.), The Future of Academic Freedom (University of Chicago Press, 1998). Please see above for further information and RSVP details.

Great Works Faculty Development Session
Technology-Enhanced Great Works
Thursday, April 11, 11:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.
Do you use technology to enhance your communication-intensive activities throughout the semester?  Are you interested in learning different techniques to use both in and out of the classroom, such as blogs, podcasts, and video production, to name a few?  This meeting will allow us to share our inventive approaches to incorporating technology in the Great Works course.
Lunch will be provided If you would like to register, or have any questions, please contact jody _rosen@baruch.cuny.edu.  To complete your registration, you must receive a confirmation e-mail.  Space is limited, but we will try to accommodate all who are interested in participating. 

Faculty Book Club
Discussing The Future of Academic Freedom
Monday, April 14, 12:30-2:00 p.m., NVC 8-213
Elisabeth Gareis will facilitate this meeting on this semester's book selection, Louis Menand (ed.), The Future of Academic Freedom (University of Chicago Press, 1998). Please see above for further information and RSVP details.

Master Teacher Series - Claude Steele
The Psychology of Social Identity: Its Role in Group Performance and the Challenges of an Integrated Society
Wednesday, April 30, 12:45-2:15 p.m., H-763
Steele's presentation is rooted in research aimed at identifying unseen pressures on the academic performance of groups whose abilities are negatively stereotyped - such as women and minorities. He is the Lucie Stern Professor of the Social Sciences at Stanford University.
RSVP to Juan Pagan at Juan_Pagan@baruch.cuny.edu or 646-660-6500

Click here to view a video of Prof. Steele's presentation.

Great Works Faculty Development Session
Designing a Semester of Low-Stakes Assignments
Thursday, May 1, 12:30 - 2:00 p.m.
Using low-stakes assignments can be an effective way to encourage students to engage with the Great Works course material in smaller, less-stressful ways before jumping in to a big assignment.  In this session, we would like to consider designing syllabi that use low-stakes assignments--written or oral--to scaffold larger, high-stakes assignments.  Please bring a copy of a syllabus you would like to re-vamp to include more low-stakes work.
Lunch will be provided If you would like to register, or have any questions, please contact jody_rosen@baruch.cuny.edu.  To complete your registration, you must receive a confirmation e-mail.  Space is limited, but we will try to accommodate all who are interested in participating. 

Fourth Annual CUNY General Education Conference
Making It Work and Making It Matter
Friday, May 2, 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
The keynote address will be delivered by Louis Menand, the Anne T. and Robert M. Bass Professor of English and American Literature and Language at Harvard University and a former faculty member of the CUNY Graduate Center. There will be 48 presentations distributed over four time slots. The full program will be posted soon.


The Teaching of Foreign Languages: Learning objectives and assessment
Wednesday, May 2, 2008, 2:00-4:00, NVC 6-210

Full-time and part-time faculty will discuss issues related to the teaching of foreign languages. Particular attention will be given to the learning goals for elementary and intermediate language courses as well as the implementation of new assessment tools.

SEMINARS IN FALL 2007

Workshops for New Faculty
Orientation for New Faculty

Wednesday, August 22 & Thursday, August 23, 2007, 9:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m., NVC 14-250
This two-day orientation is designed to welcome new faculty members by providing them with the support and information needed to start the semester well. Participants will meet peers and discuss a wide-range of
teaching related issues. The following day will be devoted to exploring technology both in and out of the classroom. At the event's conclusion, new faculty can converse with respective deans from the School of Public Affairs, the Weissman School of Arts and Sciences, or the Zicklin School of Business.
To find out more, visit the Syllabus page on Baruch's Faculty Handbook (http://www.baruch.cuny.edu/facultyhandbook/topics.htm). Feel free to contact the Provost's office for further questions.
RSVP to Abigail Stevens at Abigail_Stevens@baruch.cuny.edu or 646-660-6500

Master Teacher Series
Mel Silberman
Getting Started with Active Learning
The same workshop will be presented twice.
Tuesday, September 25, 2007, 12:45-2:30 p.m., NVC 14-280

Tuesday, September 25, 2007, 4:00-5:45 p.m., NVC 14-280

Mel Silberman returns to Baruch after an appearance on Baruch's Master Teacher Series in spring 2007. He will discuss and demonstrate a variety of active learning strategies designed to enliven your classroom. Learn ways to stimulate discussion, dramatize concepts, prompt student inquiry, and promote team learning. This is a follow-up to Dr. Silberman’s workshop, “Getting Started with Active Learning.” All are welcome -- both previous and first time pa participants. Dr. Silberman is a psychologist known internationally as a pioneer in the areas of active learning, interpersonal intelligence, and team development. He is a professor of adult and organizational development at Temple University and president of Active Training, a company based in Princeton, NJ.
RSVP to Abigail Stevens at Abigail_Stevens@baruch.cuny.edu or 646-660-6500

International Faculty Development Workshops
Teaching Nonnative Students
Wednesday, October 10th, 2007, 12:30–2:00 p.m., NVC 8-213
Thursday, October 11th, 2007, 12:30–2:00 p.m., NVC 8-213

Workshops led by Profs. Elisabeth Gareis and Denise Patrick of the Communication Studies Department for members of Baruch's international faculty. Topics include: effective verbal and nonverbal behavior in and out of the classroom, monitoring student comprehension, engaging nonnative speakers in classroom activities and group projects, grading oral and written assignments, common cultural issues, and referring students to support services
Please confirm your plans to attend by sending an e-mail with your selection of date to Elisabeth Gareis at egareis@baruch.cuny.edu

Master Teacher Series
Jim Eison
Promoting Deep Learning
The same workshop will be presented twice.
Monday, October 15, 2007, 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., NVC 14-280
Monday, October 15, 2007, 4:00-6:00 p.m., NVC 14-280

All too many students appear content to scratch the surface of assigned course readings and to memorize minimally that which might appear on examinations.  Consequently, one significant challenge facing college and university faculty is to develop instructional strategies that stimulate students to delve more deeply into course material.  This interactive session will explore ways faculty: (1) can help students better understand and appreciate the important differences between surface and deep learning, (2) design course activities and assignments that require critical and creative thinking, and (3) structure class time to support in-depth exploration and self-reflection.Jim Eison is a psychologist who has made teaching, learning, and faculty development in higher education the focus of his professional career. He is a professor at the University of Florida and is the founding director of the Center for Teaching Enhancement at the University.
RSVP to Abigail Stevens at Abigail_Stevens@baruch.cuny.edu or 646-660-6500

Workshops for Great Works Faculty
Incorporating Dramatic Performance into the Great Works Syllabus
Tuesday, October 23, 2007, 12:30-2:00 p.m.
How can we use dramatic performance to help our students better understand the texts they are assigned in Great Works?  We will consider the Jonathan Bernstein productions available for this semester as well as other performance-based activities of your choosing.  Please join us to share your techniques and exchange ideas with other members of the faculty.

Workshops for Sociology/Anthropology
Commenting on Student Writing: Critical Thinking, Thesis-Driving Writing and Commenting as Coaching
Wednesday, October 31, 2007, 11:30 a.m.-1:00 p.m., Annex 323
Faculty in this department has expressed concern about the quality of student writing and about engaging students with discipline regarding specific ideas and concepts. In this workshop fellows and faculty explore ways to enhance students' technical and intellectual skills.

Workshops for Sociology/Anthropology
Blogging Across the Curriculum: What are Blogs? How do They Work? Are They for Me?
Wednesday, October 31, 2007, 1:30-3:00 p.m., Annex 323
This seminar gives a history of blogging in the academic world and investigates how it can be incorporated into a Sociology or Anthropology curriculum. We look at different blogs being used at Baruch and other institutions to see how they can be used as an integral part of the classroom experience.

Workshops for Instructors of English
Placement, Assessment, and Rubrics: Where to Enroll Students and How to Evaluate Them
Friday, November 2, 2007, 10:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m., Newman Conference Center 763
Facilitated by Ellen Block, Carol Morgan, and Frank Cioffi.
This workshop will have three parts, one led by each facilitator.
Cioffi will start with presentation of his "flow chart" of how students are tracked at Baruch, how they are brought to what would seem to be the right course for them. Morgan, who is in charge of both the Immersion Program and SACC, will discuss the way that students are dealt with in the Immersion Program and its relationship to the ACT exam, that is, the way "out of" 0132 or Immersion and into college credit courses. Block will discuss the notion of rubrics, namely, grading guides that indicate what counts for a certain grade on a written assignment.

International Faculty Development Workshops
Effective Lecturing
Thursday, November 8, 2007, 12:30–2:00 p.m., NVC 8-213
Wednesday, November 14, 2007, 12:30–2:00 p.m., NVC 8-213

Workshops led by Profs. Elisabeth Gareis and Denise Patrick of the Communication Studies Department for members of Baruch's international faculty. Topics include: tips for an attention-getting beginning and ending with impact, making lectures easy to follow, memorable, interesting, and interactive, and using Power Point effectively.
Please confirm your plans to attend by sending an e-mail with your selection of date to Elisabeth Gareis at egareis@baruch.cuny.edu

Institutional Review Board Workshop
Procedure and Criteria
Tuesday, November 13, 2007, 12:30-2:00 p.m., NVC 14-280
The Baruch College Institutional Review Board (IRB) is pleased to invite all faculty to a workshop on the procedures and criteria used in completing and reviewing applications for IRB approval.  The workshop is designed to help people with little or no experience in submitting applications to understand the process so that they submit applications that are complete and address the key issues clearly.  Our hope is that this will further reduce the time it takes for us to review applications and to enable you to focus on doing  your research. 
RSVP to Keisha Peterson, IRB Administrator at   Keisha_Peterson@baruch.cuny.edu or Hannah Rothstein, IRB Chair at Hannah_Rothstein@baruch.cuny.edu

Workshops for Great Works Faculty
Using Group Work in the Great Works Classroom and Beyond
Wednesday, November 14, 2007, 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
Do you use group work throughout the semester?  For particular activities?  Are you interested in learning different techniques to facilitate student collaboration both in and out of the classroom?  This meeting will allow us to share our inventive approaches to group work centered in the Great Works course.

Workshops for Instructors of English
Addressing the Issues of Multilingual Writers at Baruch
Friday, November 16, 2007, 10:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m., Newman Conference Center 763
In the first hour of the workshop, “Breaking Down ‘ESL’,” Maria Jerskey, Ph.D. and Sarah Nakamaru will facilitate a discussion distinguishing the different backgrounds, strengths, needs, and characteristic writing features of student writers at Baruch, including those typically labeled “ESL.”  In the second hour, “Responding to Multilingual Writers,” participants will look at first drafts and revised versions of student texts and discuss the teacher responses that led to the revisions. In the third hour, “Developing Writers in the T Sections,” Molly Turner, Ph.D. will discuss strategies for addressing student writers’ needs in 2100T and 2150T.

Workshops for Faculty Development
Best Practices in Creating and Proctoring Final Exams
Tuesday, November 27, 12:45 p.m.-2:15 p.m., NVC 14-280
Wednesday, November 28, 4:00 p.m.-5:30 p.m., NVC 14-280
The Academic Integrity Committee is sponsoring these workshops as a means of encouraging members of the faculty to share problems and solutions and to stimulate discussion of these issues. We'll also provide cookies and coffee. As an additional spur to discussion, you might like to have a look at the sites below, which include a variety of suggestions, as well as information on proctoring assistance.
RSVP to Abigail Stevens at Abigail_Stevens@baruch.cuny.edu or 646-660-4500
http://www.baruch.cuny.edu/facultyhandbook/ProctoringExams.htm

http://www.baruch.cuny.edu/facultyhandbook/documents/ProctoringBrochure.pd
Master Teacher Series
Jeanette Norden
Promoting Intellectual and Personal Development
Wednesday, November 28, 2007, 11:00 a.m.-12:30 p.m., NVC 14-250
This presentation is designed to bring to awareness that the underlying goals of the professor play a major role in guiding decisions in the classroom – regardless of venue or subject matter.  Jeanette Norden will use examples from her own teaching of both undergraduates and medical students to show how her goal of wanting to stimulate intellectual and personal growth has influenced how and what she teaches.
Stimulating Learning in Our Students - Effective Teaching
Strategies
Wednesday, November 28, 2007, 1:00-2:30 pm, NVC 14-250

In part, teaching excellence involves the ability to teach in a way that communicates effectively, stimulates curiosity, and promotes a deep understanding of a subject.  In this workshop, Jeanette Norden will share teaching tips and methods that she has found are particularly helpful in creating an environment that fosters learning.
Dr. Jeanette Norden is a neuroscientist and Professor of Cell and Developmental Biology in the School of Medicine, and Professor of Neuroscience in the College of Arts and Sciences. She has been a maverick in Medical Education, stressing not only intellectual, but also personal and interpersonal development in students. Dr. Norden was highlighted as one of the most effective teachers in America in What the Best College Teachers Do (K. Bain, Harvard University Press, 2004).
RSVP to Abigail Stevens at Abigail_Stevens@baruch.cuny.edu or 646-660-6500.

Workshops for Faculty Development
Addressing the Challenges of Quantitative Literacy - Not just for Math Professors!
Thursday, November 29, 2007, 1:00-2:30 p.m., NVC 14-220
Prof. Michael Burke teaches mathematics at the College of San Mateo and is a visiting scholar at the Carnegie Foundation. He is working on a book, drawn from his own integrative approaches to teaching, that advocates teaching students to use mathematics in ways that prepare them for active lives as citizens in a democracy.
He encourages the integration of mathematics, statistics, and their manifold forms of representation with other undergraduate courses. In this manner, he helps students understand, critique and write about serious issues that range from global warming to world population growth, all of which require the proper interpretation and use of quantitative data in a variety of forms.
Prof. Burke issues a challenge to his fellow educator - both those who teach mathematics and those who teach the other disciplines - to address the challenges of quantitative literacy.
Please see the following links for additional details:
http://www.carnegiefoundation.org/perspectives/sub.asp?key=245&subkey =2451
http://www.carnegiefoundation.org/perspectives/sub.asp?key=244&subkey =1984
Buffet lunch at 12:30 - RSVP's are essential: Contact Abigail Stevens at Abigail_Stevens@baruch.cuny.edu or 646-660-6500 to reserve a space. Please cancel if your plans change.

Workshops for Great Works Faculty
Visiting Oral Communication in the Great Works Classroom
Thursday, December 6, 2007, 3:30-5:00 p.m.
Communication-Intensive need not only refer to written communication.  This meeting will provide the space not only to consider oral presentations for the Great Works course, but will open the conversation to other spoken components that can enhance our classes.  Please bring one or two examples of how you infuse your course with oral communication for the day's discussion.

Workshops for Instructors of Mathematics
Innovative Teaching of Quantitative Methods
Tuesday, December 11, 2007, 1:15-3:15 p.m., NVC 6-215
Deborah Hughes Hallett was one of the main authors of the famous Harvard Project and Calculus Reform,  resulting in a non-traditional approach to the teaching of precalculus and calculus.  It coined the rule of three (which later became four) as mentioned by Michael Burke in his talk. She is an acknowledged expert on Innovative Teaching of Quantitative
Methods.

Workshops for Instructors of English
Literary Criticism, Its Future and Its Relationship to Freshman Writing Courses
December 19, 2007, 10:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m., Newman Conference Center 763
In this workshop, Bill McClelland and Mary McGlynn, Associate Professors of English, will explore ways in which writing classes employ literary criticism to teach the fundamentals of academic writing. Students in these classes typically write several essays, all of which represent responses to and analyses of literature. In short, this workshop will explore what kinds of inquiry student papers make. What is the model for these papers? Do these papers resemble essays that appear in professional literary critical journals, such as PMLA, American Literature, New Literary History, Critical Inquiry, or the like? How does “professional” literary criticism differ?
In addition, this workshop will ask the question, “Is the English course the ideal venue for the teaching of first year writing?” Is it possible that other disciplines and departments should also be closely involved in writing instruction? Why is English-and its form of discourse, literary criticism-seen almost universally as the ideal location for the required writing course? And what direction will this take as the 21st century progresses, and printed material gradually disappears?