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The Baruch College Faculty Handbook

Faculty Development Seminars 2013-2014



Last updated on 4/15/2014

Support for many of these seminars is provided in part by the Baruch College Fund. Also see the archived series for 2002-2003, 2003-2004, 2004-2005, 2005-2006, 2006-2007, 2007-2008, 2008-2009, 2009-2010, 2010-2011, 2011-2012, and 2012-2013.   For Research Without Borders (presentations about their research by members of the Baruch faculty and invited guests), go here.

Please feel free to send ideas for seminars to
Associate Provost Dennis Slavin.

 

 

SEMINARS IN SPRING 2014

 

MAY 2014

Thursday, May 1, 12:45-2:15 PM, NVC 14-267
Utilizing the Rubin Museum for Great Works Classes
This roundtable will draw on the research and experience of three faculty members in Baruch’s Department of English, Eva Chou, Shelly Eversley, and Miciah Hussey, who have integrated works from the Rubin Museum of Art into their curriculum. In this roundtable, we will continue the discussion we started last semester on strategies for incorporating visual art in our Great Works classes (though attendance at the last roundtable is by no means required to attend this roundtable). We will look at some specific assignment ideas, museum-visit tips, and connections between Himalayan art and readings frequently taught in Great Works classes.

RSVP to Keneika.Rowe@baruch.cuny.edu or 646-312-2060.  Lunch will be provided.

 

Monday, May 5, 1:00-2:30 PM, NVC 14-290
Assessment at baruch: What are we doing and why?
The assessment of student learning continues to be an important aspect of higher education. A meaningful assessment process is essential to improving the quality of our programs and curriculum. This forum will offer attendees information to improve understanding of the assessment process, explain its relevance to our mission, and offer examples of best practices from within the college. A comprehensive and coherent approach to assessment allows us to improve student learning, meet accreditation requirements, and enhance teaching throughout Baruch. All members of the Baruch College community are encouraged to attend in this event. We will review Baruch’s current assessment activities, provide information on best practices, and explore actionable ideas for guiding departments’ assessments. Participants will also have an opportunity to discuss the new College guidelines for assessing programs, majors, and minors.  

RSVP to Joseph Bendana at Joseph.Bendana@baruch.cuny.edu.  Light refreshments will be served.

 

Monday, May 5-Sunday, May 18
Preparation for Teaching Online: A Foundational Workshop for CUNY Faculty
This two-week, asynchronous, instructor-facilitated workshop is designed to prepare CUNY faculty for teaching online and/or hybrid classes. The workshop models effective design and facilitation skills and addresses design issues, pedagogical approaches to teaching online and hybrid courses, as well as organization and management of an online class. It also provides an opportunity for faculty to become more familiar with the environment of the Blackboard LMS from both a student and instructor perspective. The total time on task is estimated at an average of 10 hours for participants. There are no face-to-face meetings required. assessment of student learning continues to be an important aspect of higher education.

The description of the workshop and the application form can be found at http://cunyonline.commons.gc.cuny.edu/ -- where you also find the full annual schedule of workshop dates.

 

APRIL 2014

Thursday, April 3, 1:00-2:30 PM, NVC 14-269
Oral History Workshop
Erica Fugger from the Columbia University Center for Oral History Research will lead an interactive workshop about interview techniques and other issues related to oral history research.  If you are a student who will be conducting oral history interviews for a class assignment, please come!  If you are a faculty member interested in doing oral history projects in your classes, please come and bring your students! Sponsored by the Weissman Collaborative Grant.  

Please email Debra Caplan at debra.caplan@baruch.cuny.edu to confirm by Wednesday, April 2. Refreshments will be provided.  

 

Thursday, April 3, 2:15-3:45 PM, NVC 14-280
Writing Poems and Translating Texts: Analysis and Comprehension Through Creativity
This roundtable will focus on ways to improve reading comprehension and analytical skills by asking students to create texts themselves. By writing poems, students can learn what choices go into writing poems, and will understand better how to analyse the choices that went into the poems they are reading for class. Similarly, by writing new translations of the texts we assign, students can gain a closer understanding of the text, and can also feel more invested in the course material, and more empowered by their language skills that, in other classes, often feel like a hindrance. We plan to offer specific assignment ideas that can be adapted to many texts taught in Great Works classes. We will be joined by Ely Shipley (English) and Esther Allen (Modern Languages).

RSVP to Keneika.Rowe@baruch.cuny.edu or 646-312-2060.

 

Thursday, April 10, 2:15-3:45 PM, NVC 14-280
The Structure of Success: Scaffolding Assignments
In this roundtable, we will discuss techniques for breaking down your big, final assignment into smaller parts – a process called scaffolding. This will help students deliver superior work, process the course material more thoroughly, and avoid procrastination. Business Policy 5100 instructors Professor Marx and Professor Becker, along with Communication Fellows from the Schwartz Institute, will present and discuss assignments that utilize scaffolding. They will discuss some of the ways you can break an assignment down – for example, through free-writing, brainstorming, writing annotated bibliographies or outlines, or producing a first slide – and they will show the ways that these methods provide students with opportunities to better understand and revise their work. It also enables instructors to provide instructional support and feedback during the process of the assignment completion. Professors Marx and Becker will present and speak to what it is like to incorporate scaffolding into content-heavy courses. The presenters will provide specific examples and techniques for scaffolding your own assignments. Participants are encouraged to bring any assignments they wish to re/design by incorporating scaffolding.

RSVP to Keneika.Rowe@baruch.cuny.edu or 646-312-2060.

 

Wednesday, April 23, 9:00 AM-3:00 PM, CUNY Graduate Center, 365 5th Avenue
Research in the Classroom:  A CUNY Workshop
This workshop features platform presentations and breakout sessions that analyze how CUNY’s colleges have integrated research into their curriculums across disciplines.  Workshop discussions will review methods for assessing the impact of this endeavor on student success.

To register for this workshop click here.

 

Monday, April 28, 12:30-2:00 PM, NVC 14-270
Talking (And Not Talking) About Race on Campus
The seminar will be led by Dr. Erica Gabrielle Foldy and Dr. Tamara R. Buckley, authors of The Color Bind: Talking (And Not Talking) About Race at Work. Dr. Foldy is an Associate Professor of Public and Nonprofit Management at the Wagner Graduate School of Public Service at New York University. Dr. Buckley is an Associate Professor of Counseling at Hunter College, and holds a dual appointment at the CUNY Graduate Center. Lunch will be served, and five copies of the book The Color Bind: Talking (And Not Talking) About Race at Work will be raffled off during the seminar.

RSVP to Affirmativeaction@baruch.cuny.edu

 

MARCH 2014

Thursday, March 13, 12:45-2:15 PM, room H763 (Library Building)
Writing About Numbers
This interdisciplinary roundtable discussion invites instructors to think about the practice of writing and the practice of interpreting numbers as mutually reinforcing skills. “Writing About Numbers” intends to bridge a conversation across Weissman, the School of Public Affairs, and Zicklin that will help instructors identify ways of effectively improving student writing and mathematical reasoning. The overarching goal is to explore ways that students can analytically and creatively use writing to think about numerical data and other communicative models (i.e., graphs, charts). We will explore how low-stakes writing assignments can help students exercise critical thinking skills, make connections between data and theory, build arguments about data, and process complex concepts imparted in reading or class discussion. We will look at a few specific examples of such writing exercises.   We will be joined by Bill Ferns (CIS) who will discuss some of the ways he has used writing activities and assignments in his courses.

RSVP to Keneika.Rowe@baruch.cuny.edu or 646-312-2060.

 

Wednesday, March 19, 3:00-4:30 PM, room 301 (Administration Building)
Multiple Choice Tests & Bloom's Taxonomy - How To Use Them to Assess Learning
Do you use multiple choice tests in your courses or for assessment? If so, how do they stack up in terms of effectiveness? Multiple choice tests are one form of assessment, but often they barely scrape the surface of students' understanding, only measuring memorization skills. If written effectively however, multiple-choice tests can successfully assess higher order thinking skills.

We invite members of the faculty and staff to attend a webinar on using multiple choice tests to assess different levels of learning. Participants will learn how to evaluate appropriate uses of multiple choice tests and determine when they are most effective. Participants also will be presented with the best guidelines for developing multiple choice items, as well as how to develop exams that evaluate learning beyond simply recalling facts.

RSVP to Marjorie Dorime-Williams at Marjorie.Dorime-Williams@baruch.cuny.edu.

 

Thursday, March 20, 6:00-8:00 PM, VC 14-270
U.S. – Europe Seminar- War without War: The World of the Cold War
New books by Sorin Radu Cucu and Roland Végsö address how the Cold War shaped, and was shaped by, the literary imagination of American and Eastern European writers and American popular culture. A discussion of the geo-political and symbolic form of the World in the Cold War and its aftermath.

Wine and cheese at 5:30 PM.

For more information contact John Brenkman.

 

Thursday, March 27, 12:30-2:00 PM, room 14-240
What is gained and what is lost when parts of a large lecture courses are moved online?
Economics Professor Ted Joyce, who oversees the Zicklin Online Learning and Evaluation project, will present results from a randomized field experiment to explore the implications of hybridizing Economics 1001, a required, large lecture course in the Zicklin School of Business. Luke Waltzer from the Center for Teaching and Learning will facilitate a discussion of the implications of Prof. Joyce's findings for the broader hybridization efforts emerging at Baruch. 

For more information about this event, contact Luke Waltzer at Lucas.Waltzer@baruch.cuny.edu

 

Thursday, March 27, 12:45-2:15 PM, room 14-290
Understanding and Responding to Disability in the Classroom
The number of CUNY students with learning disabilities and mental health issues has increased dramatically in recent years. While students with disabilities are just as capable at succeeding in college-level work, they face unique challenges in the classroom, especially when it comes to managing workload, dealing with high-stakes testing, and participating in class. Raymond Perez, Assistant Director of Baruch's Office for Services for Students with Disabilities will discuss the work he and his colleagues do to support students inside and outside the classroom. Participants will consider what constitutes a "reasonable accommodation" in their own teaching practice and how simple changes to assignments, syllabi, and teaching methods can remove barriers that limit disabled students' success.

RSVP to Keneika.Rowe@baruch.cuny.edu or 646-312-2060.

 

Friday, March 28, 8:30 AM-2:00 PM, NVC, 14th floor
Baruch's Seventeenth Annual Conference on Teaching and Technology
Our keynote speaker is Jim Groom, Director of the Division of Teaching and Learning Technologies and adjunct professor at the University of Mary Washington. This year's program will include presentations by faculty and students about:

  • VOCAT 3.0 -- The newest version of the College's oral communication assessment tool
  • 3-D Printing and Makerspaces
  • Launching an online course* New Media Artspace
  • Publishing using Blogs@Baruch
  • Blackboard 9.1 and Collaborate, its web conferencing tool
  • Creating interactive timelines for instruction
  • A multi-year study on how CUNY students use technology
  • Research and technology for graduate students

There is no fee for attending, but we ask that you register online in advance so that we can order the appropriate amount of food.

Conference program and registration form are available at: http://www.baruch.cuny.edu/teachtech

 

FEBRUARY 2014

Thursday, February 27, 12:45-2:15 PM, room H763 (Library Building)
Facilitating Meaningful Classroom Discussion
Speaking is central to learning and internalizing content, but getting our students to do it, and do it in a meaningful way, is a challenge. Not only is it difficult to get students to speak up, or to get a diverse set of regular participants and not just the same two or three voices, it is also difficult to manage the participation once it begins, and to ensure that class discussions are focused and productive. This workshop will address these common challenges to facilitating meaningful classroom discussion, and will explore examples of effective strategies for facilitating lively and productive dialogue in class. It will also help instructors design focused class discussions to parse out difficult concepts and enhance student understanding. We will discuss specific techniques for getting as many students to participate as possible, and we will also provide tips and strategies for keeping the discussion on topic, and for moving in a linear fashion toward a deeper understanding of the course content. Participants will share strategies they currently use to generate discussion among students, as well as challenges they face in doing so.  Law professor Valerie Watnick will discuss some approaches to facilitating discussion aimed at achieving lively, engaged participation.  Participants will have the opportunity to practice designing a plan for discussion-facilitation using one of the strategies covered, and will leave with a suggested reading on the topic.

RSVP to Keneika.Rowe@baruch.cuny.edu or 646-312-2060.

 


SEMINARS IN FALL 2013

 

NOVEMBER 2013

Wednesday, November 6, 12:30-2:00, NVC 14-285
Assignment Design and Creativity: Considering the Role of Mistakes and Failures
In this roundtable we will examine the role mistakes and even failures play in producing creative and thoughtful work. How can faculty strategically promote some forms of mistake-making and or help students learn from their failures. A question we will consider in the roundtable is: How and why might it be pedagogically useful to have failure be a part of the process, an expected result of some early, middle, or even late phases of a scaffolded assignment? Most importantly, we will discuss some practical suggestions and ideas for dealing with mistakes and failures. Attendees are encouraged to bring assignments from their own classes that they would like to scaffold or rethink in order to build room for failure and creativity. Well be joined by Professor Allison Lehr Samuels (Management).

RSVP to Keneika.Rowe@baruch.cuny.edu or 646-312-2060.

 

Thursday, November 14, 12:45-2:15, room TBA
Innovative Writing Pedagogies Beyond the Humanities
How are instructors integrating writing instruction into disciplines outside the humanities? What lessons can be learned from the unique challenges and opportunities of writing pedagogy in the math, science, and social science classroom? In this roundtable we will consider the innovative techniques of science faculty who have made writing an integral part of the classroom experience, and brainstorm new practices and assignments for those who would like to increase writing in their courses. We will explore specific activities, techniques, and methods for advancing student writing and consider how these ideas can be applied across various disciplines. Well be joined by Professor David Gruber (Biology and Environmental Science).

RSVP to Keneika.Rowe@baruch.cuny.edu or 646-312-2060.

 

Friday, November 15, 1:00-3:00 (12:30 PM Lunch), NVC 14-285
A Deeper Dive into Instructional Technology
Please join our colleagues Tom Harbison (Bernard L. Schwartz Communication Institute), Luke Waltzer (Center for Teaching and Learning), and Kevin Wolff (BCTC) for a discussion about using Blackboard, VOCAT, and/or Blogs@Baruch to engage your students in broader and deeper learning. The focus will be on how instructional technology can support and improve our teaching in all types of classes, face-to-face, hybrid, or online.

An RSVP is essential: Vanessa.Cano@baruch.cuny.edu.

 

Monday, November 18, 10:30-12:00, NVC 14-270
Technology in the Classroom: Using Tiki-Toki to  Make Interactive Timelines
The following workshop is designed for teachers of Great Works of Literature courses, but are open to all teachers of literature. Many of us are starting to consider ways of integrating technology into our assignments, like asking students to digitally annotate a text or make interactive maps of a characters journey. In this roundtable, we will consider how technology might further our pedagogical aims, and we will look at a few specific examples of assignments for Great Works classes that use technology effectively and simply. Well be joined by Dana Milstein (English) who will share an assignment she created using Tiki-Toki. A few days after the roundtable, interested faculty will come and develop specific assignments using the technology discussed in the roundtable. A computer room will be reserved and other faculty and Schwartz Institute Fellows will be available for one-on-one support.

RSVP to Keneika.Rowe@baruch.cuny.edu or 646-312-2060.

 

Wednesday, November 20, 1:00-2:15, NVC 14-285
Prospectives on Global Studies (Jeffery Belnap, LIU Global)
LIU Global is an innovative global studies program whose students “focus on three distinct world regions where they pursue field work, independent study and cross-cultural and writing skills development.” Dean Jeffrey Belnap will share his reflections on global studies and study abroad as part of the Weissman School of Arts and Sciences faculty’s exploration of directions our own program and initiatives might take.

Lunch will be served.  RSVP to Katheryn.Lypides@baruch.cuny.edu.   

 

OCTOBER 2013

Tuesday, October 1, 12:30-2:00, NVC 14-280
Supporting ESL Students Oral Communication in the Classroom: A Cross-Curriculum Challenge
This roundtable will consider issues that arise in classrooms across the curriculum regarding oral communication and ESL, and will focus on practical classroom strategies. ELL students can sometimes lack the intelligibility and clear speech skills to engage in classroom activities, leaving them too intimidated to speak up, and thus incapable of entering a meaningful dialogue for deeper understanding. This workshop will address these challenges, as well as offer advice on how to design classroom activities that encourage participation from ELL students. Nancy Boblett of Columbia Teachers College and Hunter College will provide some specific suggestions on how to ask students to repeat themselves, or how to manage oral participation requirements with students who have trouble speaking and being understood. Other topics will include how to give adequate feedback and offer relevant resources; how to manage grading fairness among the native and nonnative English speakers; how to appropriately recommend our student support services such as Tools for Clear Speech and the ESL Speech Lab.

RSVP to Keneika.Rowe@baruch.cuny.edu or 646-312-2060.

 

Wednesday, October 9, NVC 7-210
Writing Program Workshop: Using our handbook
This workshop will introduce the latest version of MyCompLab, called MyWritingLab, and explain how the new program might best be utilized in the classroom. Facilitators: Frank Cioffi (Baruch College), John LaVacca III (Pearson Learning), and Heather Peck(Pearson Learning).  For more information on this workshop click here.  For information on upcoming workshops offered by the Department of English please contact Frank Cioffi.

 

Wednesday, October 16, 12:30-2:00, NVC 14-280
Why the Research Block?
In assignments across the curriculum we ask our students to perform research, but often the results do not live up to our expectations. In this roundtable we will consider practical strategies for improving our assignments in order to promote better research habits and skills. Among other topics, we will discuss strategies for leading students to helpful sources, strategies for thinking of the differences between various kinds of sources (news articles, academic books, etc.), and strategies for using sources for different aims (context, evidence, analysis, etc). We will also look at specific assignments that help to scaffold a research assignment in particular the annotated bibliography. Well be joined by Professor Louise Klusek (Newman Library, Management, Business, International Business) and Professor Stephen Francoeur (Newman Library, Journalism, Philosophy, Psychology).

RSVP to Keneika.Rowe@baruch.cuny.edu or 646-312-2060.

 

SEPTEMBER 2013

Tuesday, September 3, 2-3:00 pm, NVC 8-170
Introduction to Blackboard 9.1
This hands-on session is designed for instructors, graduate assistants, and staff with little to no prior Blackborad experience who will learn about the basic tools. For a complete description of this workshop please click here.

Tuesday, September 10, 10-11:00 am, NVC 8-170
Intermediate Blackboard Workshop
This hands-on session is designed for instructors, graduate assistants, and staff who have prior experience Blackboard but would like to explore Blackboards features (especially Assignment Objects and Grade Center) in more depth.   For a complete description of this workshop please click here.

Thursday, September 12, 6-7:00 pm, NVC 8-170
Introduction to Blackboard 9.1
This hands-on session is designed for instructors, graduate assistants, and staff with little to no prior Blackborad experience who will learn about the basic tools. For a complete description of this workshop please click here.

Tuesday, September 17, 3-4:00 pm, NVC 8-160
Introduction to NetSupport
NetSupport is a computer monitoring program that faculty can use to control the student interface experience in our computing lab facilities at Baruch College. The program allows for controlling the student-experience during instructor demonstrations and exams, quickly distributing a set of files to each student computer, interactive learning and more. This session will provide a basic introduction to and demonstration of the software.   For a complete description of this workshop please click here.

 

AUGUST 2013

Wednesday, August 13, 10-11:00 am, NVC 8-170
Introduction to Blackboard 9.1
This hands-on session is designed for instructors, graduate assistants, and staff with little to no prior Blackborad experience who will learn about the basic tools. For a complete description of this workshop please click here.

Thursday, August 15, 2-3:00 am, NVC 8-160
Introduction to Blackboard 9.1
This hands-on session is designed for instructors, graduate assistants, and staff with little to no prior Blackborad experience who will learn about the basic tools. For a complete description of this workshop please click here.

Monday, August 19, 3-4:00 pm, NVC 8-170
Introduction to Blackboard 9.1
This hands-on session is designed for instructors, graduate assistants, and staff with little to no prior Blackborad experience who will learn about the basic tools. For a complete description of this workshop please click here.

Tuesday, August 20, 2-3:00 pm, NVC 8-170
Intermediate Blackboard Workshop
This hands-on session is designed for instructors, graduate assistants, and staff who have prior experience Blackboard but would like to explore Blackboards features (especially Assignment Objects and Grade Center) in more depth.   For a complete description of this workshop please click here.

Wednesday, August 21, 10-11:00 pm, NVC 8-170
Introduction to Blackboard 9.1
This hands-on session is designed for instructors, graduate assistants, and staff with little to no prior Blackborad experience who will learn about the basic tools. For a complete description of this workshop please click here.