Immunization Policy and Information about Measles, Mumps and Rubella

Q. Why are we required to submit proof of immunization?

There have been recent outbreaks of measles, mumps, and rubella on college campuses.   These diseases are highly contagious, and can present serious health problems.    With proper immunizations, these diseases can be controlled.

New York State Law requires all college students to document their immunization.   Students who fail to provide such documentation may not register for classes.

Q. To whom does this apply?

Anyone born on January 1, 1957 or after who wish to register for credit-bearing courses.

Q. What is the required immunization?

Acceptable proof of immunization must include one or more of the following:

· A record of vaccination with live virus vaccine with the first dose given on or after the first birthday.

This includes one dose for mumps, one dose for rubella, and two doses for measles.   The dates of the live mumps and rubella vaccines must be 1969 or later.   Both measles vaccinations must have been given after 01-01-68, the first measles must be after the first birthday, and the second measles must be on or after 15 months of age,

Or

· A report of the results of a titre for immunity (i.e. a laboratory test performed on blood) for measles, mumps and rubella.

The New York State Board of Health does not accept a doctor's diagnosis for the measles, mumps, and rubella. All    students must provide exact dates of receiving the MMR vaccines or a copy of the immune titer.

An amendment to New York's immunization laws offers an additional approach to satisfying the requirements.   When students are unable to provide the required certificates of immunization, proof of attending a primary or secondary school in the United States after 12/31/1980 may serve as proof for one dose of live measles virus vaccine; If this option is used, the student must also show proof of receiving the second dose of measles vaccine (or MMR vaccine) after completion of high school.

Students who are unable to provide the required immunization documents are strongly encouraged to consult the Medical Records Office for advice on how to proceed.

Q. What is the MMR vaccine?

The MMR vaccine provides protection against measles, mumps, and rubella.   MMR vaccine is recommended for both measles vaccine doses to provide increased protection against all three vaccine-preventable diseases.   The date of the MMR immunization must be after 1972.

Q. I have not been immunized; where can I have it done inexpensively?

In New York City, the Health Departments offers free immunization to college students at clinics located in each of the five boroughs.   Call New York City Immunization Hotline (212-349-2664) for the most current information on clinics available to you.

Q. I am a foreign student who will be coming to the United States for my initial semester of college work, what must I do?

You are required to submit the same documentation as all other students.   In most cases, you will be able to be immunized in your home country.   If you were immunized in your country, please make certain to submit your documentation in English!   If you are unable to obtain immunization in your country, you must obtain your first shot immediately upon arrival in the United States.   There must be at least 30 days between the first and second shot.   You may call the Medical Records Unit (646) 312-1159 upon your arrival to find out where you may arrange to be immunized.

Q. I am an out-of-state student enrolling for the first time at Baruch College; what must I do?

You will have to submit documentation of proper immunization prior to being permitted to register for classes.

Q. I have had the measles, mumps, and/or rubella disease.   How can I show proof?

Even if you have had the measles, mumps and/or rubella the only acceptable proof of immunization would be proof of vaccination, or a blood titer that shows you are immune . If such records are not available you will have to have a blood titer that will show if you are immune for measles, mumps and rubella. Contact your physician to arrange for a blood test.   Should this blood test fail to show immunity, you will have to be vaccinated.     

Q. I have not received two immunizations against measles, but I am pregnant (or have another health problem) and cannot be immunized now.    What can I do?

If a licensed physician or health practitioner certifies in writing that one or more of the required immunization may be detrimental to your health, this requirement may be waived until it no longer poses a health problem.   The statement must specify which immunization will be detrimental, and the length of time it will be detrimental.   Your statement must be submitted with a request for a medical exemption form.   These forms are available at the Medical Records Office.

Q. It's against my religious beliefs to be immunized.   Will this prevent my enrolling at Baruch?

No.   A religious exemption may be claimed by submitting a written and notarized statement that you hold sincere and genuine religious beliefs which prohibit immunization; in the event that you are a minor, your parent or guardian must submit the statement on your behalf.   This statement must describe the beliefs in sufficient detail to permit the institution to determine that (1) the beliefs are religious in nature (not philosophical) and (2) the beliefs are genuinely and sincerely held.
Forms are available at the Information Desk located at 137A East 25 th St. Requests for both medical and religious exemptions will be reviewed by a Committee and you will be notified.

Q. Will an exemption status (for medical or religious reasons) have an effect on my class attendance?

In the event of an outbreak of measles, mumps or rubella in the College, the Commissioner of Health may order that students without documentation of immunity be excluded from attendance until the required documentation of immunity is submitted.

Q. The doctor from whom I received immunization is no longer alive (or has moved his/her practice), how can I get this proof?

If the student is already aware that he/she does not have documentation, he/she may submit a Department of Health immunization card or obtain new immunization shots or titers.

Q. Must I submit the proof of immunization and the Confidential Medical Record at the same time?

We encourage you to submit these required documents at the same time, if possible.

Q. Must I bring in the proof in person, or can it be mailed?

Proof can be mailed.   Make sure that your name and ID number are clearly indicated.   Return the forms in person to the Medical Records Unit located at One Baruch Way, Box H0721, New York, NY 10010.